Foot of snow blankets parts of Midwest, disrupts travel

Posted on

first_imgOMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A major winter storm dumped more than a foot of snow on parts of the middle of the country while another system blanketed parts of the Southwest with snow. The storms disrupted travel and shuttered many schools. There were closures of several coronavirus testing sites on Monday and Tuesday in Nebraska and Iowa. Both states saw 12 to 15 inches of snow in places. At least 4 inches of snow was expected through Tuesday across most of an area stretching from central Kansas northeast to Chicago and southern Michigan. The storm made travel treacherous in places as wind-whipped snow piled up. In the Southwest, more than a foot of snow fell in the mountains of Southern California, Nevada and Arizona.last_img read more

UniCredit designates investment banker Orcel as new CEO

Posted on

first_imgMILAN (AP) — Italian bank UniCredit says Andrea Orcel, one of Europe’s leading investment bankers, will replace outgoing CEO Jean Pierre Mustier, who offered his resignation this fall over strategic differences with the board. Orcel, a 57-year-old Italian, faces a shareholder vote before being confirmed in the role running Italy’s largest bank. Orcel spent 20 years at Merrill Lynch, where he helped manage some of the biggest bank mergers n Europe, including the merger of Credito Italiano and UniCredito to form UniCredit in 1998.  He most recently ran the UBS Investment bank from 2014-2018 and was slated to take over Spanish bank Santander in 2018, but ended up in a dispute over compensation.last_img read more

Iraq sends mixed signals over closing camp for displaced

Posted on

first_imgQAYARA, Iraq (AP) — Iraq appears to have back-tracked on plans to close a camp for internally displaced Iraqis, many with links to the Islamic State group. This comes after a week of confusion and outcry from families unable to return home. Iraq’s minister of migration and displacement said this week that news that Jadah 5 camp in northern Iraq would close within the month was false and that it would remain open for the foreseeable future. A letter issued by the ministry’s provincial directorate in Ninevah province addressed to its sub-districts said closures would begin on Jan. 25, suggesting that the federal government reversed the decision.last_img read more

Students attend Career Expo

Posted on

first_imgAbbey Coons remembers attending Notre Dame’s Career Expo in 2003, where she secured an internship for General Electric (GE). Now, she’s back as a recruiter looking for students with initiative and experience. “I think companies like GE specifically like Notre Dame’s work ethic and integrity,” she said. “It really meshes with company values.” Nearly 1,800 students attended the Fall Career Fair Wednesday at the Joyce Athletics and Convocation Center to scout out summer internships and post-graduate jobs from 140 companies — just as Coons once did. To prepare for the Career Fair, many students took advantage of the services at the Career Center in Flanner Hall. “There have been many students even early in the year,” said Laura Flynn, assistant director at the Career Center. “It’s been a busy couple of weeks.” Junior Amy Holsinger worked with the Career Center to prepare her résumé. “I feel like I’ve been living in Flanner the past few weeks,” she said. “The résumé review has been amazing.” But even with preparation, standing out in a sea of accomplished, suit-clad students isn’t easy. “I did an internship before, but I know it’s hard for most people to get one,” senior Caitlin Foster said. Flynn said students of a variety of ages were expected to attend the Career Fair. “We definitely expect the seniors to be looking for jobs, and the sophomores and juniors for internships,” she said. This dedication and enthusiasm for finding a job doesn’t go unnoticed by potential employers. “They’ve really provided a new high standard,” said Dian Flittner of Sentry Insurance. Laurie Bryne, representing the medical equipment manufacturer Stryker, said the company plans to recruit Notre Dame students heavily.   “We elevated the status of Notre Dame in 2008 as a core school, which is a school that Stryker has determined to partner with to recruit for the entire company,” said Byrne, the company’s associate director of staffing and talent sourcing.   Though many students hope to obtain an interview as a result of the Career Fair, Kevin Monahan, associate director of the Career Center, said attending the Career Expo doesn’t necessarily have to be part of a detailed strategy for finding a career. Instead, it can provide the students with the chance to get their names into the opening market, he said. “Career Expos are about getting information from employers and making a good impression,” he said. “The economy is still a little tight, but things are definitely looking up for employment.” Still, many students hope the Career Expo will lead to success stories like that of Coons, who expects companies to continue considering Notre Dame students as strong candidates. “I received an internship with GE through the same recruiting process in 2003 and have been with them ever since,” she said.last_img read more

Lunch’ promotes discussion

Posted on

first_imgStudents and faculty gathered Friday to engage in feeding their minds and their stomachs. “The Professors for Lunch Series” kicked off last week to discuss “The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society” — the latest book of Brad Gegory, professor of Early Modern European History. The event was the first in the Series, an initiative inspired by Political Science Professor Vincent Munoz’s desire to build the intellectual life for students on campus.  “Notre Dame students are fantastically smart, but it seemed to me that we should offer them more to encourage their intellectual life beyond the classroom,” Munoz said. “We do a fantastic job of providing athletic activity beyond the classroom, and ND students are known for their athletic prowess, but I don’t think they’re known for their intellectual curiosity. I think it’s there, but the culture hasn’t developed.” Munoz said that this was an immensely student-driven event, reflecting on feedback that he collected from students in classes and in conversation. Morgan Pino, senior and undergraduate assistant to Munoz, said she met with Munoz to help coordinate the event. “His basic idea was that he wanted to bring the professors to the students,” Pino said.  “He sees how busy we are and felt like the students don’t necessarily get intimidated, but find the professors a little inaccessible.” Since students eat meals in the dining halls three times per day, Pino said they decided to host the event during a meal to help Notre Dame students find time for intellectual life in their busy schedules.  The talks, Pino said, feature a group meal before a question-and-answer session and general conversation. Senior Laura Taylor, a participant in the talk hosted by Gregory, said the convenience of the talks gave the already-attractive event extra allure. “I was very excited about the event because it offered a ton of students from all majors the opportunity to witness a lecture from one of Notre Dame’s most renowned professors,” Taylor said. “Even better, it was offered at lunch ­ a much more convenient time of day for most students … and it was held at an easily accessible location.” Student government’s Neal Ravindra, director of academic affairs, helped to coordinate further logistics of the event and helped attract students. “Originally [Pino] and Professor Munoz reached out to us and asked if we wanted to help promote the event and get students to come,” Ravindra said. “We mainly helped to hammer out details and to direct logistical things like advertising.” Ravindra said student government representatives are excited about the series, and would love to see it continue in the future. “We are very glad for the opportunity to provide students with this cross-disciplinary experience and to see them pursue learning outside of the classroom that’s not necessarily going to be for anything other than their intellectual development,” he said. Ravindra said the events were planned around three specific goals outlined by Munoz  to nurture, help and create.  “Our goals are to nurture undergraduate intellectual life beyond the classroom, to help create an interdisciplinary intellectual community among the faculty and between faculty and students and to create a forum for learning for the entire Notre Dame community, while recognizing and celebrating outstanding faculty achievements,” Ravindra said. Taylor said she plans to attend more lunches because she appreciated the opportunity to engage intellectually with faculty and students from diverse disciplines. Also, she is excited by its potential to have a positive impact on the Notre Dame community. “The atmosphere at Notre Dame is definitely one centered on academic performance; this is wonderful, but it allows students to get too wrapped up in their specialized courses of study,” Taylor said. “These opportunities for discussion are an excellent chance to broaden our minds and expose ourselves to the incredible breadth of knowledge that is being shared by our professors.” Freshmen Matt Hing of Dillon Hall and Kendra Reiser of Pangborn Hall also attended the event, and said that they enjoyed the chance to hear one of Notre Dame’s prominent professors discuss his work. “Professor Gregory is an engaging professor in class, so I wanted to hear him outside [of class],” Hing said. Resier echoed Hing’s thoughts. “I wanted to attend the event because I wanted to learn more about how religion can play a stronger role in the institution that we have,” Reiser said. Munoz said judging from the feedback of the first event, he envisions holding this event more frequently. “I think we’ve hit upon a good idea,” Munoz said. “We’re doing it to make life at Notre Dame more interesting for the students. The focus is on creating an event that would resonate with the students, what would be intellectually engaging for them. We want to not only cater to their interests, but elevate them.”last_img read more

Public figures remember Fr. Hesburgh

Posted on

first_imgBarack Obama, 44th President of the United States“Michelle and I were saddened to learn of the passing of Father Ted Hesburgh.  During his lifetime of service to his country, his church, and his beloved University of Notre Dame, Father Hesburgh inspired generations of young men and women to lead with the courage of their convictions.  His deep and abiding faith in a loving God, and in the power of our shared humanity, led him to join the first-ever United States Civil Rights Commission, and join hands with Dr. King to sing ‘We Shall Overcome.’  His belief that what unites us is greater than what divides us made him a champion of academic freedom and open debate.“When I delivered the commencement address at Notre Dame in 2009, I was honored to thank Father Hesburgh for his contributions to our country and our world.  Father Hesburgh often spoke of his beloved university as both a lighthouse and a crossroads – the lighthouse standing apart, shining with the wisdom of the Catholic tradition, and the crossroads joining the differences of culture, religion and conviction with friendship, civility, and love. The same can be said of the man generations of students knew simply as ‘Father Ted.’  Our thoughts and prayers are with his family, his friends, and the Notre Dame community that loved him so dearly.”Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the United States“Hillary and I mourn the passing and celebrate the remarkable life of Father Hesburgh. His brilliant stewardship of Notre Dame produced generations of leaders and scholars whose hearts and minds were shaped by his example. Hillary and I were proud to call him friend and counselor, and I was honored to present his Congressional Gold Medal. We will always remember his great sense of humor and his dauntless faith, his staunch advocacy for civil rights and a peaceful planet, and his lifelong commitment to public service. His entire life was a constant reminder of our common humanity. Our prayers are with his family, the Notre Dame family, and his legion of friends throughout the world.”Condoleezza Rice, former Secretary of StateMA, Class of 1975“This is a day of both personal sadness and celebration of a singular life. I will sorely miss Father Ted, my friend and mentor of 40 years. His commitment to education and social justice was infectious and I am grateful for having experienced his common touch, his sense of humor, his love of learning and his passion for Notre Dame.“When my father died, Father Hesburgh wrote to me that my dad was now ‘resting in the loving hands of our savior, bathed in the light of eternal life.’ Now too, does our beloved friend.“Rest well, Father Ted. You showed us what it meant to be a faithful servant and made our country and the world a better place. Your memory and spirit will live on at Notre Dame and in each of us who had the honor to know and love you.”John Boehner, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives“Father Ted was truly a man of God and the people.  As the Kipling poem goes, he could walk with kings and not lose the common touch.  Through his service, he showed us all the possibilities of the heart, and of complete  devotion to God.  For his many contributions, he became the first leader in higher education to be awarded the Congressional Gold Medal.  Now he receives the reward of eternal rest.  I extend the condolences of the whole House to the Hesburgh family, the Congregation of Holy Cross, and the University of Notre Dame.  The passing of this fine priest is a loss for us all.”Nancy Pelosi, Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives“Father Theodore Martin Hesburgh dedicated his life to justice and peace.  Each and every day, President Hesburgh fulfilled the calling of St. Francis to ‘preach the gospel, and sometimes use words’ by living his faith through his incredible service.  As a dedicated member of the clergy, outstanding educator, caring humanitarian and civil rights champion, he leaves behind a towering legacy of leadership – inspiring all of us to keep fighting for a world that honors the spark of divinity that rests in everyone.“Father Hesburgh never abandoned the spirit of volunteerism that led him to serve as a Navy Chaplain during the Second World War – and that earned him the position of Honorary Navy Chaplain towards the end of his life.  World War II forced Father Hesburgh to abandon his studies in Italy, but he never abandoned his call to minister to people suffering from war and injustice.  He marched arm in arm with Rev. Martin L. King, Jr. in support of the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act.  He led the Civil Rights Commission and advocated for the Affordable Care Act to improve the lives of America’s families.  His legendary tenure at the University of Notre Dame, from his start as a chaplain for married veterans to his 35 years as University President, was an extension of the ministry he cherished: empowering generations of young men and women to create purposeful lives.“On the streets, in classrooms, and in boardrooms, Father Ted was courageous enough to speak out against injustice, compassionate enough to bring healing to the downtrodden, and creative enough to propose ideas that improved the lives of all people.  May it be a comfort to all who loved Rev. Hesburgh, that so many share in their grief during this sad time.”Jackie Walorski, U.S. Representative, Indiana’s 2nd District“The news of Father Hesburgh’s passing is a profound loss not only for our community, but also for the entire country. Today we mourn a great man, a beloved priest, and one of the most influential leaders in higher education.  I send my heartfelt condolences to his family and the entire Notre Dame community.”Lou Anna Simon, President of Michigan State University“The passing of Ted Hesburgh has touched us all very deeply. We here at Michigan State University are especially saddened by his death. The University of Notre Dame and Michigan State University have been and always will be inextricably connected in so many ways.“Nowhere else is this connection more alive than in the relationship that existed between Father Hesburgh and former MSU President John Hannah. I don’t think it’s an understatement to say both men are 20th-century legends. One turned a great Catholic university into a Catholic great university. The other turned a great land-grant university into a land-grant great university.“But beyond their extraordinary contributions to higher education and the pursuit of knowledge, both men established themselves as leaders in the fight for civil rights and the dignity of all human beings. Dr. Hannah chaired the first Civil Rights Commission, established in 1954 by President Dwight Eisenhower. Father Hesburgh was a member of that group.“The commission made recommendations to eliminate discrimination in areas such as education, voting and housing. The commission overcame its political differences and presented to President Johnson the framework for the 1964 Civil Rights Act.“It’s also important to note that Father Hesburgh was president of Notre Dame in 1972, the year the university became a co-educational institution, allowing women the same opportunity as men to pursue a better life through higher education.“We were honored to have Father Hesburgh visit Michigan State many times. Few will forget his commencement address to graduating Spartans. It was during the unrest of the 1960s when he shocked parents by telling them their kids needed two things from them: “Give them love and laughter.”“Early on when I was provost at MSU, I had dinner with Father Hesburgh. We talked about a wide range of issues, including social justice. It was absolutely extraordinary to hear his reflections on the connections and partnerships with MSU that were value-centric.“He embodied a unique combination of reflection, strength and action. It’s hard to imagine the number of lives positively impacted by his work over the years.” [View the story “Public figures remember Fr. Hesburgh” on Storify]Tags: Hesburgh, public figures, tweetslast_img read more

Alexander Hamilton Society provides opportunity for debate on campus

Posted on

first_imgThe University’s chapter of the Alexander Hamilton Society (AHS) is hosting its first event on campus this week — a debate about the United States’ policy regarding North Korea, rather than a musical performance.Sophomore president of AHS Marea Hurson said she started a Notre Dame chapter of the non-partisan national debate society this year in an attempt to encourage campus engagement with national and foreign policy.“You get a lot more out of it, no matter what side you’re on, if you can hear both sides,” Hurson said. “Because then you realize why you believe what you do, or maybe you get a new perspective shown to you. So we’re excited to be able to bring debate to campus.”Sophomore Annalie Nagel, co-vice president of AHS, said the debate format of the group’s events allows people to directly respond to each other in the moment.“It’s a very unique setting, as opposed to all the lectures that are going on this week, because you get two ideas, they’re presented in a — not contentious, but an adversary format, and they have to directly disagree with each other,” she said. “That fray and conflict adds a lot of interest, and hopefully we’ll get a lot of questions from both sides of the aisle.”The experience of planning debates and hearing two experts speak on national policy provides a valuable chance for people to engage in current events on campus, Hurson said.“It’s a great avenue for people who are interested in going into a career in politics, or in Washington or any kind of national security — any of those things,” she said. “What’s cool is we have the freedom to decide what topic we want to do, what expert we want to bring in and what kind of topic we want them to debate. And so it’s a great way to get the whole campus community engaged in current events.”Although the group’s upcoming inaugural debate — “North Korea and Nuclear Deterrence, is Secretary of State Rex Tillerson right in saying ‘The policy of strategic patience has ended?’” — is particularly timely, sophomore co-vice president of AHS Jane Bachkora said the group happened to be fortunate that the debaters’ expertise led them in the same direction as the current political climate.“We got really lucky, because when we decided to do North Korea, a lot of what’s currently happened hadn’t happened yet,” she said. “So we got lucky in that sense.”Director of the Peace Accords Matrix (PAM) at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and special advisor for policy studies at the Keough School of Global Affairs David Cortright will debate AHS expert and Georgetown professor Matthew Kroenig on Thursday at 6 p.m. in the Hesburgh Center Auditorium. Hurson said the group hopes this debate will pave the way for more debates, as well as regular meetings to discuss current events.“The goal would be to have two debates per semester,” she said. “For a bit of it, it kind of has a transient membership, because you need a core of about 10 or 12 committed people to help plan all the events and everything, but the idea is to get the whole campus just to come. The goal is always to have about 70-plus [people in] attendance at a debate.”Bachkora said getting involved with AHS and attending any debates the group hosts allows people to broaden their worldviews and strengthen their beliefs.“You can’t limit yourself to one point of view,” she said. “You can’t only watch FOX News, you can’t only read The New York Times. I believe the best way to educate yourself, and the best way to be informed and the best way to be an ideal citizen is to take in as many points of view as you can, and then be able to decide for yourself. … And I think this society does just that.”Tags: Alexander Hamilton Society, Debate, Foreign Policy, North Korealast_img read more

Notre Dame introduces musical theatre minor

Posted on

first_imgIn an effort to encourage students of varied interests to express themselves through the arts, the departments of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT) and Music are working together to launch a new minor in musical theatre this fall, said Matt Hawkins, assistant professor and head of the minor.“There’s always been an interest and an energy on campus about doing musicals, which has grown a little bit over the last couple of years,” Hawkins said.He said the FTT department decided to put on the musical “Cabaret” in the 2013-2014 season to gauge student interest in musical theatre, and because a number of students came out to audition, they put on “Little Shop of Horrors” in the 2015-2016 season. This push from the students lead the department to begin the process of adding musical theatre to the curriculum.“We designed the minor to be flexible,” Peter Smith, music department chair, said. “We require a course on the history of musical theatre, electives from music and FTT, and we require a senior capstone project, but it is designed specifically for the student’s interests and tailored to them.”Smith said the primary motivation behind the minor is to provide the students broader opportunities to engage in the arts in a more scholarly manner. “I think people don’t always realize that studying [the arts] actually contributes greatly to a person’s intellectual development,” he said. “Sometimes we’re a little too focused on this idea of preparing for a career, but these kinds of things will do that for people in various ways. Learning a role, presenting it on stage, learning to act and sing — the kind of poise and command it requires and the longterm commitment and ability to work in a collaborative group are all skills that have applicability.”Freshman Brigid Harrington said she was drawn to Notre Dame to continue her artistic training while also receiving a formal education after working professionally in the field for most of her childhood.“I am interested in the new [musical theatre] minor because the program will allow me to grow as a performer, take artistic risks and explore every aspect of my art,” Harrington said.Hawkins also said that the minor is not only for students who are considering pursuing the arts as a career. Rather, the minor was created with the intention of drawing students in from a variety of majors and disciplines.“Even though we’re supporting our theatre students and the ones who are interested in being musical theatre artists, the minor is actually tailored to individuals [outside of FTT] who are artistic, who are interested in the humanities or understanding society and culture and expression or are a patron, who like going to concerts, films or theatre,” Hawkins said.Hawkins said he ultimately strives to cultivate the individual’s voice, which he accomplishes by giving the students opportunities to act in leadership roles.“[For a musical theatre lab class], I have a student playwright, and my music director is also a student. I have a creative associate who’s acting as a producer who’s a student, and I have three choreographers that are all students.”Hawkins said he hopes the minor will allow students to exercise their creativity and use art as a platform to consider their interests.“Art can be a response to our political climate, our cultural climate and all of our social issues, so if you’re interested in expression, if you’re interested in how people feel about things and you want to see how that has changed over the past 120 years of our history of musical theater in the U.S., musical theatre will do that for you.”Tags: Department of Film Television and Theatre, Department of Music, musical theatre, musical theatre minorlast_img read more

Jesuit priests create their own community on campus

Posted on

first_imgAlthough Notre Dame is a primarily Holy Cross institution, it is home to a handful of Jesuit priests who believe the two missions align well enough to live, work and attend classes.The Society of Jesus — the official name of the Jesuits — began ministry at Notre Dame’s location in the 17th century, and built the original log chapel which Fr. Edward Sorin later used with his Holy Cross brothers when he founded Notre Dame in 1842.However, the community of five Jesuit priests who currently live on campus came to South Bend more recently.Fr. Brian Daley, a Jesuit priest, first arrived at Notre Dame as a professor of theology in 1996 as a founding member of the community which today lives in a house adjacent to campus. Besides Daley, the current community consists of four Jesuit priests pursuing their doctorates in the fields of philosophy and theology.Even though Notre Dame is not an institution directly associated with the Society of Jesus, the Jesuit community sends young priests pursuing degrees to obtain advanced degrees in the University’s prestigious theology and philosophy departments.“The idea is they want us to get the very best degrees, to be in the very best programs that we could possibly get into,” said Fr. John Peck, a philosophy student.Capitalizing on the opportunity to gain the best education is what inspired the Society to originally found the community, Daley said.“They would be less inclined to send a guy here who has been recently ordained, who is fairly young, if there weren’t a community of some sort to put them in,” he said.The five priests each lead independent lives, and only interact in passing during the day. They come together in the evening to celebrate Mass every day at 6:30, which is followed by dinner.The priests take turns preaching at Mass and cooking dinner. While Fr. Michael Magree, a theology student, said all the priests are apt cooks, both he and Peck acknowledged Daley is the top chef in the house.After dinner, the priests remain to relax and socialize. They often talk about their days, watch sports or discuss philosophy and theology.“We’re sort of nerds,” Peck said. “A lot of what we do is exchange ideas about our fields.”While the communal activities of the household may seem mundane, the presence of the community holds great significance for all the priests.Daley spoke about how — though he loves Notre Dame — he would not have remained at the University as long as he has without the Jesuit community. Peck also stressed the importance of community to his success as a student and priest.“You don’t feel like you’re alone in this vocation, you don’t feel like you’re alone in this life,” he said.The community exists as a group of brother priests. Magree, who coordinates the spiritual and practical life of the community, leads it.“He has a special responsibility to make sure that each of us has what we need to flourish in our Jesuit life and in the work that we do,” Peck said.Magree emphasized that his role consisted more of listening than giving orders. “It’s about creating a space where we can share the fruit of our own prayer and our vocation together,” he said.All the Jesuits at Notre Dame function in their capacities as priests in addition to their roles as students or professors.The priests contribute to the sacramental life of campus by saying Mass and hearing confessions at the Basilica. The Jesuits also see students one-on-one for spiritual direction, an area in which Peck said the priests offer a distinctive Jesuit imprint.“St. Ignatius had very deep experiences of Christ, and out of those experiences of Christ, he taught others ways of praying,” Peck said, referring to the founder of the Society of Jesus. “Part of what we do as Jesuits is pass on those Ignatian ways of praying and discerning.”However, the Jesuits do not hold administrative positions at the school, something they appreciate in their lives as students and professors, Daley said.“This is a great place to be a Jesuit, because you’re not in charge, as a group, of the institution,” he said. “You just come and do your thing, and you kind of fly under the radar.”For Peck, this balance of offering their gifts without influencing Notre Dame’s operations defines the Jesuit community at Notre Dame.“Without trying to make Notre Dame Jesuit — which we have no desire to do — I think the tradition and the spirituality and the approach to ministry we offer does contribute something to the mix,” he said. Tags: Jesuits, ministry, priests, the Society of Jesuslast_img read more

Specimen Collection Site Set Up In Jamestown For COVID-19 Testing

Posted on

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now Image.JAMESTOWN – A Jamestown hospital is set to open an outpatient specimen collection site to help with testing for the novel Coronavirus.Officials with UPMC Chautauqua Hospital say starting Wednesday the site will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Jones Memorial Health Center.Doctors will soon direct patients who have received a physician consultation and subsequent referral to get tested for the virus.Hospital staff stress that the site is not open to the public and walk-ins will not be tested. Patients who are referred by a doctor to be tested will receive a call from the hospital to set up an appointment.Staff collecting the samples will be outfitted with proper protective gear in order to prevent possible contamination and spread of COVID-19.Hospital officials say people who suspect they have COVID-19 but do not have a high fever or breathing problems should call their primary care physician or use their provider’s virtual visit options to get advice. Anyone with a high fever or breathing trouble should go to their local emergency department for evaluation and care.last_img read more