Foss: New Schenectady Trading Co. does great job of promoting local goods

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first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:Troopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopNational Weather Service forecasts a 42 percent chance of a ‘warmer-than-normal’ winterEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcy Categories: News, OpinionUntil I visited the Schenectady Trading Company, I had no idea how much stuff gets made in Schenectady County — how much food, clothing, art, crafts and other household items is produced right here.“If you think of Schenectady County as a factory, a factory has a factory store,” Caroline Bardwell, owner of the Schenectady Trading Post, explained. “I want to be the factory store for Schenectady County.” It’s an interesting concept, and it’s beautifully executed. The store, which opened at 609 Union Street at the end of September, is stocked with goods produced in Schenectady County. To step inside and look around is to be amazed by the county’s wealth of talent, which now has a terrific showcase. Here’s a small sample of the items you can find in Schenectady County’s new factory store: Apple cider from The Hungry Chicken Country Store in Rotterdam Pierogies from Codin’s Italian Food Specialty in Schenectady “Electric City” pint glasses and sweatshirts designed by Bardwell Coffee products from Electric City Roasters and Mohawk Coffee Company Handcrafted wall carvings and kitchen tools from Niskayuna woodworker Michael Consolo Mittens, hats and gloves from Newberry Knitting on Curry Road Colorful handmade quilts from Schenectady-based Beyond the PinesBardwell hopes that people come to the Schenectady Trading Company to shop. But her vision for the store goes beyond retail. She wants the Trading Company to build community — to be a place where people can gather and interact. The shop has a welcoming small front room, which Bardwell refers to as the parlor, that can be used by small groups, such as a book club. There’s a playroom with toys, books and games for children. Hot coffee is available, and there are tables to sit and enjoy a cup. On Tuesdays, the shop hosts a “creatives’ coffee hour” from 11 a.m. to noon and again from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. The hope is that creative people will get together, talk and forge connections. Bardwell also hopes to host events — readings and signings with local authors, performances by local musicians. A signing with Schenectady writer Johnny Rockenstire, author of “Crucible Along the Mohawk,” a work of historical fiction that brings to life the events surrounding the Schenectady Massacre of 1690, is scheduled for Nov. 30. The store will also host a “coffee with a cop” event, where members of the public can chat with a Schenectady police officer, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Nov. 15. “Schenectady gets a bad reputation that clouds the positive stuff that a lot of hardworking people are doing,” Bardwell, 40, told me, when we chatted in the parlor on a recent weekday morning. Bardwell believes her shop can instill hometown pride while also giving visitors a deeper understanding of the diversity of talent and skill in Schenectady County. Based on my own reaction to the store, I’d say she’s right. “The shop represents the community,” Bardwell said. “A lot of people want to buy local, but it’s a lot of work to buy local. It has a greater impact when the stuff is all together.” Bardwell is working to establish an online store, which should be up and running later this month, and her ribbon cutting ceremony is this Thursday at 4 p.m. You can see Bardwell’s own work at the shop. Her photograph hangs from the walls, and her book of poetry and photography is available. A 1997 graduate of Schenectady High School, she is a geologist by training, and spent much of her career in environmental remediation. The store is the result of a “period of personal change,” that saw her shift her focus from science to writing poetry and to “paying more attention about what’s going on in Schenectady County.” “I felt very compelled to change what I was doing and do something very community focused,” Bardwell recalled. She’s certainly succeeded. The Schenectady Trading Company is a nice place to visit and shop, and it does an excellent job of promoting the unique and interesting goods produced and made in Schenectady County. (To learn more, check out the store’s very informative Facebook page.) Hopefully the Schenectady Trading Post will receive the support it needs to thrive, and be a presence in downtown Schenectady for years to come. last_img read more

Access all areas

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Two high-flyers break from Fortress

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Inner city

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Cashback is not a cop-out

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Essex & NE London: Talk of the towns

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How will its garden centres grow?

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Poundstretcher takes Yorkshire warehouse

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Challenge completed: Transjakarta directors shave heads after breaking record

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first_imgActing president director Yoga Adiwinarto said the head-shaving was in response to a challenge from Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan who issued a dare to the directors and managers after they set a record of 500,000 customers on March 20, 2018.“Yes, the governor challenged us to [shave our heads] if one day we reached 1 million passengers. Alhamdulillah [praise God], we did it today,” Yoga said in a media statement on Wednesday.PT Transjakarta Director of Operations Prasetya Budi (Courtesy of/TransJakarta)Yoga also made a video call with former president director Agung Wicaksono to express his gratitude for Agung’s dedication and leadership during his time at the company. “Thank you, Pak Agung. [This is] all thanks to your hard work and we present this as a gift to you,” said Yoga in front of Transjakarta’s directors, managers and employees.Agung had stepped down from his position as president director on Jan. 23 after helming Transjakarta from October 2018. He is widely considered to have successfully built the foundations for the integration of public transportation in Jakarta from Jak Lingko angkot (public minivans) to rail-based transportation.“Thank you. I wish you all success,” Agung replied.The bus operator has made great strides over the past few years with the number of Transjakarta passengers increasing to 264.61 million from 188.98 million in 2019.Topics : City-owned bus operator PT Transjakarta’s management team shaved their heads on Wednesday as part of the celebrations of the company’s success in breaking the record of serving 1 million passengers in one day.PT Transjakarta made Jakarta public transportation history by serving over 1 million passengers on Tuesday, up from 987,583 in the previous week.Read also: Achievement unlocked: Transjakarta breaks record for serving one million customers in a daylast_img read more

Landmark case says Aboriginal Australians cannot be deported

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first_imgTopics : Aboriginal Australians are exempt from immigration law, the country’s top court ruled Tuesday, in a historic decision that found indigenous people born overseas cannot be deported.Australia had been trying to deport two men — Papua New Guinea citizen Daniel Love and New Zealand citizen Brendan Thoms — under laws that allow a convicted criminal’s visa to be cancelled on character grounds.Both men identify as Aboriginal Australians, each has one indigenous parent, and they have lived in the country since they were small children. But the judges could not agree on whether Love was under a three-part test that considers biological descent, self-identification and community recognition.Lawyer Claire Gibbs, who represented the men, hailed the decision as “significant for Aboriginal Australians”.”This case isn’t about citizenship, it’s about who belongs here, who is an Australian national and who is a part of the Australian community,” she told reporters in Canberra.”The High Court has found Aboriginal Australians are protected from deportation. They can no longer be removed from the country that they know and the country that they have a very close connection with.”The case marked the first time an Australian court has considered whether the government has the power to deport indigenous people.But it also touched on the contentious question of how Aboriginality is defined in the law.Gibbs said she was “confident” that they would eventually be able to prove Love’s status as he was “accepted by his community as Aboriginal” and had “biological proof” that he was a descendant of the First Australians.Lawyers will now pursue compensation claims on behalf of both men, who Gibbs said had suffered “severe embarrassment” and been “subject to ridicule” as a result of being Aboriginal men held in immigration detention.center_img Love, who served time for assault, and Thoms, who had been jailed for domestic violence, have been battling in the courts to stay in Australia, arguing that they may be “non-citizens” but they are also not “aliens”.The High Court ruled in a decision that split the judges 4-3 that Aboriginal Australians “are not within the reach” of constitutional provisions relating to foreign citizens.Indigenous people have inhabited the vast continent for more than 60,000 years, while the modern nation’s constitution only came into force in 1901.Thoms — who was already recognized as a traditional landowner — was accepted by the court as Aboriginal.last_img read more