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El Salvador: Youth group studies brutal history in context

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first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Youth & Young Adults Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA marvin alexander says: Chuck Stewart interprets for a youth group from the Episcopal Diocese of Central New York during a visit to El Mozote, the site where in 1981 government troops massacred 800 residents of the village. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Driving into the small, tranquil village of El Mozote, it’s difficult to comprehend that one of the largest violations of human rights in the modern Americas occurred there 31 years ago.The Inter-American Human Rights Court called the 1981 killings in and around El Mozote “a systematic plan of repression” carried out by El Salvador’s military during the civil war.Between Dec. 11 and 13 of that year, government soldiers shot dead more than 800 people, more than half of them children, in what was the largest massacre during El Salvador’s 12-year conflict that killed some 75,000 people.“It reminded me of My Lai,” where U.S. Army soldiers murdered more than 300 unarmed civilians in South Vietnam in 1968, said Audrey Cleaver-Bartholomew after visiting the El Mozote memorial as part of an Episcopal youth pilgrimage.Audrey Cleaver-Bartholomew, foreground, and Pilar Padrón during a visit to the Museum of the Salvadoran Revolution. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceCleaver-Bartholomew studied the 1990s ethnic cleansing in the former Yugoslavia and the My Lai Massacre in high school genocide class, but the El Mozote Massacre wasn’t mentioned, she said.In El Mozote, the soldiers carried out the massacre over two-and-a-half days, said Cleaver-Bartholomew, 19. “[The soldiers] had time to think about it. It was so systematic. What can get people to that point?”“You can understand the details, but not the motives,” she added.The youth group – six girls aged 14 to 19 – visited many of El Salvador’s historic sites, including the Chapel of Divine Providence Hospital, where Roman Catholic Archbishop Oscar A. Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980; the Romero Center and Museum of the Martyrs at the University of Central America; the Monument to Memory and Truth, which lists the names of people killed during the civil war; the Museum of the Salvadoran Revolution; and El Mozote, the site of the 1981 massacre.The Episcopal Diocese of Central New York and the Anglican-Episcopal Church of El Salvador have been in a companion relationship, formally and informally, for 20 years, said Chuck Stewart, chair of the companion diocese committee and a member of St. James in Skaneateles.It was the seventh youth pilgrimage Stewart had led to El Salvador.The trip aimed to expose the young people to a different culture, “yet show them that people here have the same aspirations,” said Stewart. In the more than 20 trips he has made to El Salvador over the years, he added, “I’ve learned that people are the same everywhere, they can be joyful and happy in grinding poverty.”Besides visiting the various historical sites, the group also traveled to communities of extreme poverty assisted by the church and Foundation Cristosal, a human rights-based community-development organization.One thing Cleaver-Bartholomew noted toward the end of the weeklong visit to El Salvador was that, despite the history of violence and the violent current reality – El Salvador has one of the highest murder rates in the world – people live in relative peace, without the everyday anxieties suffered by people of affluence.“You’d think it would be the opposite,” said Cleaver-Bartholomew. “I’d heard about El Salvador before I came, but it doesn’t add up until you get here.”The group descends from the hill where some of the women and children were said to have been massacred in El Mozote. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFrom 1980-1992, El Salvador suffered a brutal civil war fought between its U.S.-backed, military led-government and a coalition of guerilla groups, organized as the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front, or FMLN. The war was fueled mostly by the gross inequalities that existed between a small group of wealthy elites who controlled the government and the economy and the majority of the population that lived in extreme poverty.Pilar Padrón, one of the group’s chaperones, first visited El Salvador on a similar youth trip from Central New York.“The last time I came down I was their age,” said Padrón. “It changed my life so much, I’m excited to see how they are changed.”Padrón first visited El Salvador when she was 16. She previously had visited the Dominican Republic, where her father was born. Still, she said, nothing prepared her for the poverty and the resiliency she witnessed.“It made me feel like I wanted to do more for them … It opened my eyes to suffering and showed me that there are ways that we can help,” she said, adding that afterward she began to feel called to the priesthood and to the work of bridging the gaps between communities and countries. “It made me want to stand for something, for people, to lead communities of faith and teach the gospel.”Padrón, now a student at SUNY Fredonia and a member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Westfield, New York, is an aspirant in the Diocese of Western New York.“I’m excited to see where [the girls] take this experience later in life,” she said.The names of the people who were massacred are listed on the wall at the memorial in El Mozote Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceA four-hour drive from San Salvador, the town of El Mozote is located in Morazán, a department, or “state,” in El Salvador’s northeast held by rebels during the latter years of the civil war. El Mozote remained neutral during the war, and its citizens were told that they’d be safe as long as they didn’t align themselves with the rebels. In the end, that’s not what happened.When the soldiers first arrived in El Mozote in 1981, explained local guide Estella Lopez Chica, they separated the men from the woman and the children, killing the men first.Soldiers raped the women and girls before killing them, and small children and infants were later found hanging in the branches of a mangrove tree, their throats slit, said Lopez.The guide’s mother survived the massacre, she said, because she was away from town selling goods at nearby market the day the soldiers arrived. The account is based on the sole survivor’s testimony.The group also visited the Chapel of Divine Providence Hospital, where Roman Catholic Archbishop Oscar A. Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“Today was really powerful, I was getting really emotional, just to know hat someone could do that to another person,” said Molly Allyn, 15, of St. James Episcopal Church in Skaneateles.Traveling together in this environment, where everything is very serious, you get to know a different side to people, she said.“In the van, we can be obnoxious sometimes. But on the first or second day after learning about the civil war for the first time, it went from talking and laughing to complete silence,” she said. “It’s hard for us to process sometimes because we can’t relate it to anything that has happened in our lives.“Being here is not like sitting in a history class.”El Mozote was upsetting and hard to handle, said Mary Sawyer, 19, of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Moravia. She will attend Onodaga Community College in Syracuse in the fall.“I have always felt safe in the U.S.,” said Sawyer. “I’m from a small town where everyone knows each other. I can’t imagine how anyone could go through that. I have nothing but sympathy for those people.”Sam Laurie, 16, a high school junior and a member of Christ Church in Manlius, participates in model United Nations, where students are assigned a country and a committee and y run a mock general assembly, discussing topics and writing and submitting resolutions. In the past, Laurie has been assigned Pakistan, Switzerland and Hungary.Laurie learned a lot about El Salvador, she said, putting into context some of what she’d learned studying post-Cold War, post-imperialist Latin America in her advanced-placement history classes. She also witnessed firsthand how devastating it can be for a country prone to earthquakes and other natural disasters, with nothing but raw materials to sell to the global market, to move from a culture of dependency on wealthier nations.In college, Laurie plans to study international relations. She said she hoped eventually to become a diplomat.“This experience has changed, opened my eyes a lot,” she said, adding that, if people really knew what was happening in the world, they would work to change it.“But either they don’t know or they don’t want to know,” said Laurie. “The world is never the same. It changes every day no matter what. What people can control is that it changes for the better or for the worse.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. She currently is based in San Salvador, El Salvador. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 22, 2013 at 10:16 pm me gusta su nota bastante seria aun cuando yo naci a mediados de los ochenta recuerdo de niño que hablaban del final de la guerra y el comienzo de una nueva era basada en la paz y la igualdad cosas que hasta hoy comienzan a ver luego de 2 decadas de un gobierno que siempre busca defender los mismos intereses de unos pocos y no de la gran mayoria… Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ El Salvador: Youth group studies brutal history in context TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (1) Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Latin America, Rector Shreveport, LA By Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 22, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

Minor church damage reported as Diocese of West Texas assesses…

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first_img Rector Tampa, FL COVID-19 Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Episcopal News Service] Episcopal leaders in the Diocese of West Texas are assessing the impact of Hurricane Hanna, which made landfall on July 25 as a Category 1 storm and prompted Gov. Greg Abbott to declare a disaster in 32 counties.The diocese has congregations in 19 of those counties, with up to 51 congregations potentially affected. At least five have reported structural damage from the storm, according to a July 28 diocesan news release, and minor damage also was found at the Mustang Island Conference Center in Port Aransas.“I’m thankful that damage in the Coastal Bend and in the [Rio Grande] Valley is relatively minor, though ‘minor’ only applies if it didn’t happen to you,” Bishop David Reed said in the release. “I’m also profoundly grateful for the ways our clergy and lay leadership in the impacted areas responded.”The Diocese of West Texas is based in San Antonio, and its 90 congregations are spread over 60 counties, from the Gulf of Mexico along the Rio Grande to the border city of Del Rio. The diocese was among those hit hard three years ago by Hurricane Harvey, which made landfall near Port Aransas as a Category 4 storm.Hanna was the first storm to reach hurricane strength during this year’s Atlantic hurricane season. It made landfall on Padre Island, south of Corpus Christi, with winds up to 90 mph. Thousands lost power in the region, with some areas reportedly facing a sustained threat of flooding this week from more than 15 inches of rain.In addition to Abbott’s disaster declaration, the Federal Emergency Management Agency granted a federal emergency declaration for the region to make additional resources available to communities and residents in responding to Hanna’s aftermath.Texas also has been hit in recent weeks by a surge in COVID-19 cases, which Abbott noted during a July 28 visit to the Rio Grande Valley. While there, he announced a convention center in McAllen, Texas, will be converted to a health care facility to help the region handle the increase in coronavirus patients.Reed, too, addressed the ongoing pandemic in his statement on the hurricane. “Almost all of the places Hanna visited are in the midst of serious COVID-19 spikes, and yet our people were able to turn their attention to the multiple threats posed by the storm and prepare,” Reed said.On July 24, as the storm was approaching, staff at the Mustang Island Conference Center sent family camp participants home to safely prepare for the hurricane’s impact, Reed said. The diocese reported that the storm surge damaged a 60-foot section of boardwalk, as well as equipment that had been stored in a beachside platform.The diocese had announced in May that it was canceling or postponing various summer camps, youth programs and retreats, though it continued taking reservations for families wishing to plan weekend getaways at Mustang Island through Labor Day. The center implemented health precautions and modified activities in response to the pandemic, and with repairs underway this week, the center expected to begin welcoming families back on July 30.Trinity by the Sea Episcopal Church in Port Aransas posted a Facebook video of the hurricane’s wind and rain lashing the church building on July 25. The Rev. James Derkits, the rector, said the next day in a follow-up video that “things are looking pretty good around the church.”St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in nearby Rockport also fared well in the storm, the Rev. James Friedel, the church’s rector, said July 26 on Facebook.“We have just been though a hurricane, again,” he said, “but fortunately we were on the north end of that storm and did not get the severe storm surge, as well as rain and heavy winds, as our friends to the south, and so our thoughts and prayers are with them.”To the south in McAllen, St. John’s Episcopal Church reported July 26 on Facebook that the power was out, but damage there was minimal: “We have some fences blown down as well as tree limbs and palm fronds. We did get some water in the church building, but nothing that is damaging yet.”The diocese continues to assess the needs of all congregations in the path of the storm. Most of those who have responded so far report no damage.“The rapid development and changing track of Hurricane Hanna are strong reminders to all of us to pay attention and never become complacent during hurricane season,” Jennifer Wickham, the diocese’s deputy for disaster recovery, said in the news release. “It’s important for our congregations and households to prepare ahead of time so they’re ready for whatever may happen.”Diocesan officials also are encouraging Episcopalians to be alert to the needs of neighbors who are dealing with flooding and other damage and to seek opportunities to help. Response to those needs at the diocese level will be led by the Commission for Disaster Preparedness and Response.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at dpaulsen@episcopalchurch.org. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls By David PaulsenPosted Jul 30, 2020 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Minor church damage reported as Diocese of West Texas assesses impact of Hurricane Hanna An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

Traffic to charities’ websites jumped 800% following tsunami disaster

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first_img  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Digital Research / statistics About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Online traffic analysis service Hitwise UK reports that, following the tsunami disaster on 26 December 2004, traffic to charities’ (or “humanitarian”) websites grew by more than 800% in four days.Hitwise UK reports that the large number of visitors to UK charities’ sites at the end of December 2004 resulted in those sites accounting for 0.4% of all UK Internet traffic by 30 December, up from 0.05% on 26 December.Hitwise added that “the website of the UK’s Disaster Emergency Committee… was the most visited charity website with almost 30% share of all visits made to charity websites. “ Advertisementcenter_img The analysts added that “the appeal for donations to the crisis resulted in the website increasing its ranking by over 120 places in the space of seven days, from the week ending December 25 to January 1”.However, Hitwise UK point out that at first the DEC site could not cope: “the overwhelming response to the appeal resulted in people having difficulty making donations online and instead visitors were advised to make a donation by telephone.” Howard Lake | 26 January 2005 | News Traffic to charities’ websites jumped 800% following tsunami disasterlast_img read more

UN secretary-general asked to raise imprisoned blogger’s case with Egyptian president

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first_imgNews Reporters Without Borders today asked UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon (photo) to raise the case of imprisoned blogger Abdel Kareem Nabil Suleiman with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak during the two-day Arab League Summit that begins tomorrow in Riyadh. Suleiman was given a four-year sentence on 22 February because of his blog posts, which he wrote under the pseudonym of Kareem Amer. Reporters Without Borders points out the UN has chosen Egypt to host the Internet Governance Forum in 2009. Receive email alerts EgyptMiddle East – North Africa News February 1, 2021 Find out more News News to go further February 6, 2021 Find out more March 27, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 UN secretary-general asked to raise imprisoned blogger’s case with Egyptian president Help by sharing this information EgyptMiddle East – North Africa Reporters Without Borders today asked UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon to raise the case of imprisoned blogger Abdel Kareem Nabil Suleiman with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak during the two-day Arab League Summit that begins tomorrow in Riyadh. Suleiman was given a four-year sentence on 22 February because of his blog posts, which he wrote under the pseudonym of Kareem Amer. Reporters Without Borders points out the UN has chosen Egypt to host the Internet Governance Forum in 2009.Letter sent on 27th March by Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard :”Dear Secretary-General,Reporters Without Borders would like to ask you to raise the case of imprisoned blogger Abdel Kareem Nabil Suleiman with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak during the two-day Arab League Summit that begins tomorrow in Riyadh. Mr. Suleiman, who is better known as “Kareem Amer,” received a four-year sentence on 22 February because of his blog posts. We would point out that the UN has agreed to Egypt’s hosting the Internet Governance Forum in 2009, a choice that would seem inappropriate as long as this young blogger remains in prison.We know you are committed to promoting an uncensored Internet, one on which users can express themselves freely. We therefore feel sure you would agree that it would damage the UN’s credibility if one of the seven countries in the world that imprison bloggers was asked to host the IGF. We remind you that the second stage of the World Summit on the Information Society – which paved the way for the IGF – took place in Tunisia, a country that systematically violates online free speech.Mr. Suleiman was arrested on 6 November 2006 because of articles he had posted on his blog (www.karam903.blogspot.com), in which he often condemned the government’s authoritarian excesses and criticised Egypt’s highest religious institutions, especially the Sunni university of Al-Azhar, where he studied law. He was sentenced on 22 February to three years in prison for “inciting hatred of Islam” and one year for “insulting” the president. The sentence was upheld on appeal on 12 March. While his outspokenness may have caused displeasure, we do not think it justified putting him in prison.We trust you will give this matter your careful consideration.”——————-Lisez notre revue de blog internationale et créez votre blog sur : www.rsfblog.org Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison staff Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution Follow the news on Egypt Organisation Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prison RSF_en January 22, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

National Parks The Focus of Consecutive Exhibitions, Commemorate Centennial

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first_imgcenter column 3 National Parks The Focus of Consecutive Exhibitions, Commemorate Centennial Geographies of Wonder: Origin Stories of America’s National Parks 1872–1933On view May 14–Sept. 3, 2016 and Geographies of Wonder: Evolution of the National Park Idea 1933–2016On view Oct. 22, 2016–Feb. 13, 2017 From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 | 11:12 am First Heatwave Expected Next Week Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Thomas Moran, “Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone,” chromolithographic reproduction of a watercolor sketch, as published in Ferdinand V. Hayden, The Yellowstone National Park, and the mountain regions of portions of Idaho, Nevada, Colorado and Utah. Boston, 1876. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.In a wide-ranging examination of the evolving role of the national parks in American life, The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens will commemorate the centennial of the U.S. National Parks Service in exhibitions that run consecutively from May 2016 through February 2017 in the West Hall of the Library building. The exhibitions will touch on a variety of roles the National Parks have played over time—as scenic wonderlands that have become iconic markers and essential destination points for tourists, adventure-seekers, scientists, government surveyors, businessmen, and explorers of all stripes. The exhibitions also will examine the tensions that emerged as a result of diverging priorities and competing agendas.“The national parks are our nation’s crown jewels,” said Peter Blodgett, H. Russell Smith Foundation Curator of Western Historical Manuscripts at The Huntington, and exhibition curator. “The centennial of this remarkable system of public lands gives us a perfect opportunity to reflect a little more deeply, explore the dynamic interplay between these great American landscapes and the people who seek to define them.”The first exhibition, Geographies of Wonder: Origin Stories of America’s National Parks 1872?1933, is on view May 14 through Sept. 3, 2016 and features some 100 items—all drawn from The Huntington’s collection of rare books, manuscripts, photographs, prints, and related materials. Among the treasures on display will be a mammoth 1873 photo album by one of the premier photographers of the day, William Henry Jackson. The book will be opened to a photo of Yellowstone’s Grand Canyon. Jackson’s photographs, according to historians, played an important role in convincing Congress in 1872 to establish Yellowstone National Park, the first landscape to be so designated by the federal government.Origin Stories highlights early Euro-American encounters with scenic landscapes that eventually would acquire international renown. Initially, these were eastern settings—the White Mountains in New Hampshire, Natural Bridge in Virginia, and Niagara Falls, N.Y. But as settlers moved west, great scenic discoveries included Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, and Yosemite Valley. “In those early years of Euro-American settlement, we could claim no great cultural assets like the Louvre or the castles on the Rhine,” said Blodgett. “So these places quickly became our icons. They were essential to our cultural identity and began to draw people from all over the world.”Before there was Yellowstone, President Lincoln signed legislation in 1864 protecting Yosemite Valley, effectively turning it over to the state of California, to keep it out of the hands of developers and private ownership. While this was not the first national park, per se, it was the first scenic area placed under such protection through the actions of the U.S. government. It was, much as it is today, a spectacular, rugged, and physically demanding landscape. An 1861 letter, featured in the exhibition, by a traveler named William Boardman describes the brutally difficult trip through Yosemite he and his traveling party made by wagon and horse, and how the jarring terrain left the women, wearing unforgivingly rigid hoopskirts, bruised and battered. Even so, travelers were eager to make their way there, to see, as Boardman described it, this “wonder of wonders.” By the 1880s, scenic marvels such as Yosemite and Yellowstone had become both cultural and economic drivers, and firms like Boston’s Raymond-Whitcomb Co. were leading the way, creating all-expenses-paid tours and publishing special guidebooks to lure middle-class travelers from east to west via train. Origin Stories features an assortment of these guidebooks and an excerpt from a diary by a young excursionist named Amy Bridges, who describes her impressions of Yosemite just 30 years after the first Euro-American tourist expeditions had reached it.The exhibition also examines the treatment of Native Americans in the parks during this period. Lafayette Bunnell’s book-length account of the first Euro-American incursion into Yosemite Valley in 1851 describes rounding up “Indians” who inhabited the region and removing them from it, including Chief Tenaya, for whom Yosemite’s famed Tenaya Lake is named. Only a few short decades later, the government, as well as private promoters, would begin using images of Native Americans to “sell” tourism. The Great Northern Railway in particular adopted the image of the Blackfoot Indian as a prominent part of its marketing campaign on behalf of Glacier National Park. On display will be several examples of these types of brochures, postcards, and promotional items, including a 1904 cover of Sunset magazine featuring a painting by Chris Jorgensen showing a native hut and a native woman working in the foreground, with Half Dome in the background. “Indigenous people were ousted and resettled outside of park boundaries, and yet their historical presence was used as a prominent advertisement to entice people to visit,” said Blodgett.As interest in visiting the parks grew, so did interest in exploiting their rich resources: mineral deposits, timber, and water chief among them. To counter those activities, a call for conservation emerged, led vociferously by the renowned naturalist John Muir. Featured in Origin Stories is Muir’s 1901 volume, Our National Parks, a compendium of articles he published in Atlantic Monthly that establishes a conservation agenda and the need for active stewardship of these sites. And with such activism on behalf of conservation came Stephen Mather, assistant to the Secretary of the Interior, calling for a centralized management plan. Under Secretary of the Interior Franklin Lane, Mather created the National Park Portfolio, on display in the exhibition, a publication produced to convince Congress to create the National Park Service. Congress passed the legislation and President Woodrow Wilson signed it in August 1916. “The portfolio was strategically placed on every desk of every member of Congress at the time,” said Blodgett. After the vote, Mather was appointed the Park Service’s first director.Even with centralized management and an activist director, exploitation and encroachment into the parks remained a concern. The battle over Yosemite’s Hetch Hetchy Valley, which was flooded and dammed in the late 1910s and early 1920s to provide water to San Francisco, became a linchpin for conservation activists. The National Parks Association, a private organization established to lobby for protection, was launched in 1919. The exhibition will include copies of the NPA newsletter and a 1922 letter by the association’s then director, Robert Sterling Yard, calling for the protection of the parks from excessive development.As much as the parks were seen as wondrous places for both recreation and conservation, they were also understood as an important locus for serious scientific work. Both government and private entities launched coordinated efforts to study the biology, topography, hydrology, and geography of the parks. Origin Stories will feature letters and related documentation of early scientific study conducted in the parks, including a 1925 copy of Yosemite Nature Notes, produced by the park’s naturalist, C.P. Russell, and a 1911 report written by ethnologist Jesse Walker Fewkes, summarizing the antiquities of the cliff-dwelling Anasazi, preserved within Mesa Verde National Park.The 1920s were a “boom period” for visitors, said Blodgett, fueled by rail and automobile transportation, a roaring economy, and active marketing and advertising. But by the late 1920s and early 1930s, with the Great Depression, the numbers of visitors began to wane and the Park Service’s budget had shrunk. These were much quieter and leaner years for the parks until President Franklin D. Roosevelt launched his New Deal program, which included an ambitious plan to expand the parks. That growth period, through the present, will be examined in the second exhibition, Geographies of Wonder: Evolution of the National Park Idea 1933–2016, which will be on view Oct. 22, 2016–Feb. 13, 2017.About The HuntingtonThe Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found at huntington.orgVisitor InformationThe Huntington is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino, 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles. It is open to the public Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from noon to 4:30 p.m.; and Saturday, Sunday, and Monday holidays from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Summer hours (Memorial Day through Labor Day) are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Tuesdays and major holidays. Information: (626) 405-2100 or huntington.org. 13 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribe Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News Top of the News More Cool Stuffcenter_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Herbeauty6 Fashion Trends You Should Never Try And 6 You’ll LoveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRemove Belly Fat Without Going Under The KnifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBohemian Summer: How To Wear The Boho Trend RightHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Make a comment Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

County COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rates Drops, County Health Officer Upbeat

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first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Herbeauty6 Fashion Trends You Should Never Try And 6 You’ll LoveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyZac Efron Is Dating A New Hottie?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Things A Man Will Do Only If He Really Loves YouHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Special Massage Techniques That Will Make You Return For MoreHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Business Newscenter_img 26 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Top of the News STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News County COVID-19 Daily Positivity Rates Drops, County Health Officer Upbeat CITY NEWS SERVICE Published on Thursday, July 23, 2020 | 2:36 pm STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stuff Rising coronavirus cases and fatalities remain concerning with four dozen more deaths confirmed on Thursday, but there are signs Los Angeles County is beginning to turn the corner in efforts to slow the spread of the Coronavirus according to the county’s top health officer.On Thursday, the county confirmed another 2,014 cases, pushing the overall total to 166,848 since the start of the pandemic.The county also announced another 49 deaths.A total of 4,262 people have now died as a result of the virus, according to the county.“At least this week, we’re still seeing concerning data,” county health officer Dr. Muntu Davis told reporters in an online briefing. “There are still high case counts, hospitalizations have exceeded 2,200 people for at least the last four days in a row and tragically people are still dying from COVID-19. But I hope this week marks a turning point, and that we’ll start to see the results of our collective actions to slow the spread of COVID-19.“We’re already seeing more positive data,” he said. “Our daily positivity rate remains flat at or just below 8.5% —again, that’s a seven-day average. And while this rate is still higher than what we’d like it to be, it offers some evidence we may be returning to slowing the spread and that our efforts and sacrifices are making a difference.”The seven-day positivity rate in the county reached as high as 11% earlier this month.Davis warned, however, that recent numbers have been daunting, noting that the county reported about 9,000 new cases of the virus in the first three days of the week alone, with a majority of those infections occurring among younger residents.The county also reported that 2,210 people were hospitalized.It was the fifth day in a row the number has exceeded 2,200. But while that number remains just shy of the record set days ago, health officials noted that the steady rise in hospitalizations seen earlier this month appears to have flattened out and may actually be starting to decrease.Davis urged residents to continue adhering to public health orders such as practicing physical distancing and wearing face coverings in public,and he said business owners must continue to meet all health protocols in their operations. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDSlast_img read more

Sale and Consumption of Liquor is a Privilege Granted By The State For Which Special Fee Can Be Imposed: Delhi Govt Informs Delhi HC [Read Affidavit]

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first_imgNews UpdatesSale and Consumption of Liquor is a Privilege Granted By The State For Which Special Fee Can Be Imposed: Delhi Govt Informs Delhi HC [Read Affidavit] Karan Tripathi28 May 2020 12:55 AMShare This – xAssistant Commissioner of Excise, Delhi Government, has informed the Delhi High Court that the Delhi Excise Act, and the Rules framed thereunder, does empower the State Government to not only regulate the sale/purchase of liquor but also to formulate different rules which are specific to the regulation of liquor. The information has been given under an affidavit in a PIL filed…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginAssistant Commissioner of Excise, Delhi Government, has informed the Delhi High Court that the Delhi Excise Act, and the Rules framed thereunder, does empower the State Government to not only regulate the sale/purchase of liquor but also to formulate different rules which are specific to the regulation of liquor. The information has been given under an affidavit in a PIL filed by Praveen Gulati challenging the decision of the Delhi Government to impose a Special Corona fee of 70% on the sale of liquor. ‘There’s an element of privilege vis-a-vis the sale/dealing in liquor or for that matter the consumption of liquor, which the State is free to accord or regulate as per the State Excise law. Accordingly, State is also free to impose and recover a price for grant of such privilege’, the affidavit states. Such grant of privilege for the sale/consumption/regulation of liquor, the affidavit submits, can be done through subordinate legislation or administrative orders. The Special Corona fee, which has been imposed during the unprecedented circumstances posed by the COVID19, is nothing but a combination of price towards the grant of privilege and the cost of regulation/supervision. The affidavit also highlights that apart from Delhi, 10 other States have also imposed a similar levy on alcohol. While highlighting that sections 26 and 28 of the Delhi Excise Act do not apply to the present case, the affidavit submits that the MRP of liquor is not being raised and the same is only being used as the basis for calculating the amount of the present Special Corona fee. In the present PIL, the Petitioner has argued that the bare reading of the said Section 26 does not contemplate generating revenue under a new category of ‘Special Corona Fee’. It is further submitted by the Petitioner that the government wrongfully invoked section 81 of the Delhi Excise Act to charge this new fee. It is claimed that section 81(2)(g) is merely a procedural and regulatory provision which derives its powers from the other substantive provisions of the Act. Since neither section 26 nor Rules 152 and 154 provide for any such category, the Petitioner submits, the Delhi Government cannot invoke section 81 to generate revenue under the head of ‘Special Corona Fee.’Click Here To Download Affidavit[Read Affidavit] Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

‘Fanad firmly on the map’ after latest Lonely Planet accolade

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first_img ‘Fanad firmly on the map’ after latest Lonely Planet accolade Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Facebook By News Highland – April 7, 2021 Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic AudioHomepage BannerNews Pinterestcenter_img Previous articleStormont recalled over violence in NorthNext article‘It’s not about causing upheaval’ as teachers to table motion on vaccine roll-out News Highland News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Facebook It’s anticipated that Lonely Planet’s latest list of top ten beaches will put Donegal firmly on the map ahead of the summer season. The renowned travel publisher has ranked both Trá Mór in Dunfanaghy and Ballymastocker Bay near Portsalon in their list of Ireland’s best beaches.Eight of those selected are along the west coast with two each in Donegal, Mayo and Kerry.The writer described Ireland’s coastline as a ‘beachgoers paradise’.Cllr Liam Blaney says the Fanad peninsula generally has a lot to offer and this latest accolade can only mean good things:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/liamblaney.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. WhatsApp Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

Allen shares insights to office

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first_img Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County Probate Judge Wes Allen danced on Elvis’ grave.Brundidge Rotarians know the story and, if others twist Allen’s arm, he might be willing to share the story with them but, for now, mums the word with the Rotarians.Allen shared several light moments with the Brundidge Rotarians on Wednesday but then turned serious as he talked about his commitment to his position as Pike County’s probate judge. Latest Stories Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration The state’s new Immigration Law requires strict adherence and Allen said he is committed to that.“It is a felony if you don’t comply with the state’s Immigration law and I will comply,” Allen said. “Any person who enters into a business transaction or is attempting to enter into a business transaction with our state is required to demonstrate his or her United States citizenship.”Allen said U.S. citizenship can be demonstrated by a birth certificate, passport, driver’s license, military records or other official means of identification.“The law applies when applying for a driver’s license, a vehicle tag, a hunting license – any business transaction with the state except a marriage license.” Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By Jaine Treadwell Next Up“I try to keep my head down and work hard,” Allen said. “I try to stretch a nickel into a dime and be as efficient as I can possibly be. I have an outstanding staff and we do the most we can with what we have. But we are always customer focused, no matter what we are doing.”The Probate Office handles everything from elections to civic court and not the least among its duties and responsibilities is the issuing of licenses.At this time, the issuing of licenses is of great interest and of the utmost importance. Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits You Might Like ‘Every chair filled’ at Concerned Citizens revival The Old Fashioned Tent Revival sponsored by the Concerned Christians of Brundidge (C.C.O.B.) got off to encouraging start Tuesday night… read morecenter_img Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Book Nook to reopen Sponsored Content Allen shares insights to office Allen said when applying for a new vehicle tag or renewing a tag, if both spouses’ names are on the registration, both parties must give their driver’s license number and expiration date.Allen said that it has taken his staff only a couple of minutes to handle the extra steps required by the new immigration law.The probate judge touched on several changes in the probate office that are helping to run the office more efficiently.“We have created a more robust interface with the public,” he said. “We are on Facebook and Twitter and other social media. We have opened a satellite office in Brundidge in the old doctor’s building. We will be there on the third Tuesday of the month. The satellite office is a great opportunity for us to better serve the county.”The probate office now takes passport applications and certifies them.“Since we kicked off this service in February 2010, we have taken applications for more than 800 passports,” Allen said. “More residents are taking advantage of the mail-in options for vehicle and boat tags.“The mail-in options are offered at not additional cost to the taxpayers. These are a few of the ways that the Pike County Probate Office is working to make the office more efficient and its services more convenient for our residents.” Print Article Email the author Published 9:17 am Thursday, October 13, 2011 By The Penny Hoarderlast_img read more

New arts committee formed

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first_img Email the author You Might Like Pike County Fair opens Oct. 1 with new promoter The 2013 edition of the Pike County Fair is only days away, Oct. 1-5, and it promises to be one… read more “Studio 116 in Brundidge is an arts facility that includes a gallery and offers a schedule of arts workshops and performance events,” Drinkard said. “Then, there’s Rex Locklar’s Bluegrass Festival.”Drinkard said the Cultural Arts Committee is not a group of “me and I people.” New arts committee formed By Jaine Treadwell Sponsored Content By The Penny Hoarder Book Nook to reopen Latest Stories Published 11:00 pm Thursday, September 26, 2013 Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration The mission of the newly organized Cultural Arts Committee of the Pike County Chamber of Commerce is to foster the development of public participation in and exposure to the cultural arts in Pike County.Morgan Drinkard, committee chair, said that, in fulfilling the committee’s mission, arts organizations throughout the county will work together to provide arts experiences for all county residents.“We’ve pulled representatives from multiple cultural arts groups throughout the county,” Drinkard said. “The representatives include those from the Pioneer Museum of Alabama, Troy Arts Council, Johnson Center for the Arts, Brundidge Historical Society and the Troy University music and art departments. We’ll continue to add organizations that support the arts in various ways, including Troy University’s department of theater and dance that offers a full schedule of arts events.” Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Print Article “It’s a ‘we’ focused committee,” she said. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits The mission of the newly organized Cultural Arts Committee of the Pike County Chamber of Commerce is to foster the development of public participation in and exposure to the cultural arts in Pike County.Morgan Drinkard, committee chair, said that, in fulfilling the committee’s mission, arts organizations throughout the county will work together to provide arts experiences for all county residents.“We’ve pulled representatives from multiple cultural arts groups throughout the county,” Drinkard said. “The representatives include those from the Pioneer Museum of Alabama, Troy Arts Council, Johnson Center for the Arts, Brundidge Historical Society and the Troy University music and art departments.” The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Skip Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more