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Tree-ness House / Akihisa Hirata

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first_img Onshitsu, Yuichi Tsukada Tree-ness House / Akihisa HirataSave this projectSaveTree-ness House / Akihisa HirataSave this picture!© Vincent Hecht+ 47Curated by Fernanda Castro Share Houses Japan Manufacturers: ADVAN, IKEGAMI, IOC Flooring, TUSCANIA Biscotto, Tokuyama, Yoko Ando Construction: Projects Photographs:  Vincent Hecht Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Tree-ness House / Akihisa Hirata 2017 Architects: Akihisa Hirata Area Area of this architecture project OAK, tmsd, Taijiro Kato, Takashi Manda, Masato Araya “COPY” Year: center_img Photographs CopyHouses•Toshima, Japan Structural Engineer: Oharakomusho, Akira Ohara, Satoshi Kikuchi ArchDaily Planting Designer: ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/895346/tree-ness-house-akihisa-hirata Clipboard Project Architect:Yuko TonogiDesign Team:Kohei Oba, Masatoshi SugiyamaFacility Engineer:EOS plus, Kazuhiro Endo, Sho TakahashiTextile Designer:Yoko Ando Design, Yoko Ando, Kasumi YamaguchiPlanting Construction:Ikegami, Yasuyuki IkegamiCity:ToshimaCountry:JapanMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Vincent HechtRecommended ProductsWoodSculptformTimber Click-on BattensWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – SlidingMetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingWoodTechnowoodPergola SystemsText description provided by the architects. This project is a complex building of houses and galleries built in Tokyo, Toshimaku. One tree is organically integrated with a combination of parts having different characteristics, such as a trunk, a branch, and a leaf.  As with the tree, we tried to create an organic architecture that could be formed by a hierarchical combination of different parts such as plants/pleats (as openings) / concrete boxes.Save this picture!© Vincent HechtSave this picture!Plants – DiagramSave this picture!© Vincent HechtWhile concrete boxes are stacked three-dimensionally, the main structure containing complicated voids is made. Then, open the windows with pleats in them, agitating the inside and outside, and at the same time create a place that fits with the physical sensation of the person. In addition, we set up planting around the pleats and create an organic whole like breathing in the surrounding environment like a tree.Save this picture!© Vincent HechtWe set up a calm environment such as bedrooms and a gallery inside of the box. On the other hand, the outside of the box becomes terraces, gardens, and the place surrounded by glass as the living room and dining room. Rather than focusing only the internal space of the building, the entire space including the external space like the garden and the street is three-dimensionalized.  I intended to create a futuristic and savage architecture that awakens human animal instincts in which the inside and outside are reversed multiple times. Save this picture!© Vincent HechtSave this picture!Pleats – Concept DiagramSave this picture!© Vincent HechtProject gallerySee allShow lessKampoong In House / Ismail Solehudin ArchitectureSelected ProjectsCall for Materials: Pandemic SocietyCall for Submissions Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/895346/tree-ness-house-akihisa-hirata Clipboard “COPY” Area:  331 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeAkihisa HirataOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesToshimaIcebergOn FacebookJapanPublished on September 27, 2020Cite: “Tree-ness House / Akihisa Hirata” 27 Sep 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – LogisVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StonePartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteCupa PizarrasVentilated Facade – CUPACLAD UprightGlassLAMILUXGlass Roof PR60ConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMSkylightsVELUX CommercialAtrium Longlight Skylights in ExperimentariumMetal PanelsLorin IndustriesAnodized Aluminum – Copper FinishesStonesFranken-SchotterWall Covering & CladdingWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusSwingsStudio StirlingHanging Chair – BasketWallcovering / CladdingArrigoni WoodsWood Cladding – AcousticMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?17种阳台集合树屋 / 平田晃久是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Ancient Egyptian figurine wins most unusual donated item award

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first_img  147 total views,  1 views today Melanie May | 2 May 2018 | News  148 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis17 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis17 An ancient Egyptian figurine featuring hieroglyphics from the Book of the Dead has won the Most Unusual Item donated to a hospice shop, in Hospice UK’s retail awards.The figurine, known as ‘a shabti’, features an extract from the book, which is a compilation of spells designed to guide the deceased through the dangers of the underworld.The Egyptian artefact scooped the top prize in its category for the awards, held annually by Hospice UK. It was spotted by the manager at the Crystal Peaks shop run by St Luke’s Hospice in Sheffield and experts have verified its authenticity and believe it originates from circa.350 BC.Other unusual items donated to hospice shops for the awards included: a set of prehistoric mammoth bones and an old pair of binoculars donated to the Paul Sartori Foundation in Pembrokeshire. A volunteer spotted the potential value of the binoculars and research established that they were World War II German U-boat commander’s binoculars. The hospice later auctioned them on eBay.The prizes were awarded at the retail awards and conference Spring clean. Fresh ideas to drive your Hospice Retail Forward, on 1 May at Kenilworth in Warwickshire.Catherine Bosworth, Director of Income Generation at Hospice UK, said:“These awards celebrate the colour and creativity of the UK’s hospice retail sector, from the innovative to the downright quirky, as reflected in the intriguing items donated to hospice shops.“Hospice shops are a key player in the charity sector retail market – they raise crucial income for hospices and are also a great way of helping increase awareness about hospice care.” Ancient Egyptian figurine wins most unusual donated item award Advertisement Tagged with: Awards Donated goods hospice About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Protests across U.S. hit Trump’s attack on Palestine

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first_imgWashington, D.C. Philadelphia Philadelphia San Francisco Demonstrations were swiftly organized in cities around the United States in opposition to the U.S. declaration on Dec. 6 that it would move its embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, and in solidarity with the heroic Palestinian people in the face of this decisive attack. Workers World Party members actively participated in many of these actions. The following are reports from some of them.On just two days’ notice, 4,000 to 6,000 people came to a Times Square rally in New York City on Dec. 8 to “Say NO to Trump’s recent move of ‘recognizing’ Jerusalem as the capital of Israel,” as the call of NY4Palestine put it. NY4Palestine is a coalition of Palestinian support groups in the New York City area. The protesters were mainly Arab; whole families came, from mothers carrying infants in their arms to grandmothers. It was a very political protest with sharp slogans: “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free!” “Jerusalem is the capital of Palestine!” “Israel — tool of U.S. imperialism!” and “Long live the Intifada! Free, free Palestine!”After the rally at Times Square, the crowd marched uptown to the Trump Hotel at Columbus Circle, where another rally was held. Twitter posts show protests continuing on the subways both coming from and going to the demonstration.Thirty years to the day after the declaration of the first Intifada, or uprising, hundreds of activists took to the streets of Philadelphia in solidarity with the Palestinian people. Led by Palestinian activist Susan Abulhawa, the crowds expressed outrage at Donald Trump’s decision to build a U.S. embassy in Jerusalem.The Dec. 8 protest was initiated by the Philadelphia International Action Center and endorsed by CAIR-PA (Council on American-Islamic Relations); Philly BDS (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions); Food not Bombs; Philly REAL Justice; the International Concerned Family and Friends of Mumia Abu-Jamal; Workers World Party; the Black Alliance for Peace; MOVE; the Party for Socialism and Liberation; and Brandywine Peace Community.Abulhawa stressed that the fight to free Palestine is the same as the struggle to get rid of the paramilitary occupation forces that terrorize, assault and murder Black and Brown people in the United States. Lamont Lilly, the WWP 2016 vice presidential candidate, echoed this sentiment: “Across the sea we call the U.S. Marines, Special Forces and Army the military. Here we call them the police, the sheriffs, the FBI. But they are the same state apparatus terrorizing oppressed people.”Pam Africa, representing ICFFMAJ, spoke on the need for solidarity between Black communities facing oppression in the U.S. and Palestinians under occupation by Israel. The rally ended with chants to “Free Mumia!”Protesters marched around City Hall, taking the streets and blocking traffic. As night fell, marchers chanted slogans in English, Spanish and Arabic, and the words “Israel is a terrorist state!” and “End the occupation now!” echoed off the stone edifices in Center City. A handful of young Palestinian activists climbed onto the statue of former Mayor Frank Rizzo as the crowd began to disperse and hung a sign around his neck reading, “Hands off Jerusalem!”People came out Dec. 8 in front of the federal building in downtown Rochester, N.Y., to protest Trump’s decision. A number of groups helped the local Palestinian community organize the rally, including Christians Witnessing for Palestine, Jewish Strike for Peace and Workers World Party.Activists from the Baltimore and Washington, D.C., branches of WWP attended a Palestine solidarity demonstration directly in front of the White House. The protest was called by American Muslims for Palestine.About 500 people came out in Detroit for a militant action organized by the U.S. Palestinian Community Network-Detroit and led by Palestinian women and youth.The demonstration was notable for linking the struggle against the occupation and destruction of Palestine by Israel with the displacement of the oppressed community of Detroit, W water shutoffs and foreclosures there have been spearheaded by the same banks and imperialist interests that fund the Israeli occupation. Rally organizer Julia Kassem noted how Trump has been joined by Democratic Party leader Chuck Schumer in the call for moving Israel’s capital to Jerusalem.The demonstrators marched from Hart Plaza to Campus Martius in the center of downtown Detroit, chanting, “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free!”  At a,  rally, Abayomi Azikiwe from the Moratorium Now Coalition expressed the solidarity of Detroit’s African-American community with the Palestinian struggle, and Joe Mshahwar from Workers World Party linked the struggle against Israeli occupation with the ongoing battle of Syria against U.S. imperialist intervention.About 1,000 protesters rallied at Chicago’s federal plaza the evening of Dec. 7, angry at Trump’s imperialist, racist and insulting designation of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. The action, which included a march to the Israeli Consulate, was organized by the Coalition for Justice in Palestine.Tourists visiting San Antonio’s Alamo on a warm sunny Sunday, Dec. 10, were greeted with loud chants of “Trump, Trump, you will see! Palestine will be free!” from activists across the street at the federal building. Cars driving by honked support, tourists began videoing the action and even a few Alamo visitors joined in.At the rally, speakers condemned Trump’s announcement and told of the horrors going on in occupied Palestine. The overriding opinion was that no U.S. president has the right to declare a capital in another country.Students from the University of Texas at San Antonio said it was imperative that students stand up for people in Palestine and denounce Trump’s proclamation.Judy Lerma, an organizer for National Nurses United and speaking for Workers World Party, said, “The Palestinian people suffer from lack of medicines, inadequate health care, the worsening of existing health conditions and the creation of new ones, not the least of which are injuries caused by the military violence perpetrated by the Israeli terrorists who are bought and paid for by the U.S. government.”A representative of Jewish Voice for Peace, Judith Norman said, “This issue is not about Jews versus Muslims or Christians. It’s about a colonialist oppressor and the people who have been subject to a brutal and illegal occupation.”The protest and rally were organized by University of Texas-San Antonio Students for Justice in Palestine, local chapters of Jewish Voice for Peace and the Council on American-Islamic Relations, and San Antonio for Justice in Palestine.Members of the International Action Center and Workers World Party participated in two demonstrations in Los Angeles on Dec. 10. In the first, at the Westwood Federal Building, several hundred people participated in a solidarity with Palestine rally led by Al-Awda.The second was an International League of Peoples Struggle coalition event, of which the International Action Center is a part. That event, marking International Human Rights Day, was a protest and march from the Downtown Federal Building to the Downtown Detention Center and included the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador; School of the Americas Watch; Human Rights Alliance; the Filipino organization BAYAN-USA; California for Progress; Puerto Rican Alliance; Korean Peace Alliance; American Indian Movement Southern California; and more. All made solidarity with Palestine a primary focus while pledging solidarity with all targets of U.S. imperialism — from South Central and East LA to Honduras, the Philippines and Korea.Hundreds took to the streets of San Francisco on Dec. 9 in response to a call by the Arab Resource and Organizing Center; the General Union of Palestinian Students of San Francisco State University; and American Muslims for Palestine. Marchers demanded hands off Jerusalem; U.S. out of Palestine; no to white supremacy here or in our homelands; boycott, divest and sanction Israel; and end the colonial occupation of Palestine.Starting with a rally at United Nations Plaza, they marched, led by Palestinian youth, down Market Street to the Embarcadero, where they held a second rally. Chants included, “From Palestine to Mexico, the border walls have got to go!” and “There is only one solution: Intifada/revolution!”Sharon Black, Gene Clancy, G. Dunkel, Terri Kay, Ted Kelly, Andrew Mayton, John Parker, Gloria Rubac, Jeff Sorel and the WW Detroit bureau contributed to this article. Photos: Joseph Piette in Philadelphia; Pancho Valdez in San Antonio; Sharon Black in D.C.; Scott Scheffer in Los Angeles; Terri Kay in San Francisco; John Catalinotto in New York City.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare this New York City San Antonio Detroit Los Angeleslast_img read more

Storms threaten Mother’s Day, beginning of week across country

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first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — Several rounds of strong and severe storms will play havoc with Mother’s Day in the Plains, Midwest and Mid-Atlantic with effects lasting into the work week.A stalled weather pattern, which is also bringing notable heat across much of the South, will put several regions at risk for strong to severe storms, but a widespread, damaging weather event is not expected at this time.There is a line of strong storms riding a stationary front Sunday morning from northern Indiana to Maryland. The storms should pass off to the east with only isolated strong wind gusts and locally heavy rain possible through the day.A line of severe storms will likely fire up Sunday evening along the border between Oklahoma and Texas. There is a slight risk for severe weather in the area, including the risk for damaging winds, large hail and brief tornadoes. The threat should occur Sunday evening, with activity winding down in the early-morning hours of Monday.Further north, another round of strong storms will likely develop in eastern Iowa, southern Wisconsin, northern Illinois and northern Indiana. A slight risk for severe weather exists, including in Chicago. This round of storms likely will come in the early-morning hours of Monday with strong winds, large hail and brief tornadoes possible.Then, on Monday evening, another round of strong storms will pass over parts of the Mid-Atlantic with strong wind gusts and heavy rain likely. The storms will likely impact Washington, D.C.; Roanoke, Virginia; and Richmond, Virginia.In the Great Plains, another round of storms will develop along the Texas and Oklahoma border on Monday evening. A round of storms is likely late Monday into early Tuesday from northern Oklahoma to western Illinois, including Wichita, Kansas; Kansas City, Missouri; and Peoria, Illinois. A slight risk for severe weather exists with damaging winds, large hail and brief tornadoes the likely threat.Widespread 90s hit the SouthThe stalled, rainy weather pattern is due to a strong high pressure that has developed in the Tennessee Valley. Warm, and even hot, temperatures are expected across much of the South over the next few days, with records possible Sunday through Tuesday.On Sunday, widespread temperatures near or above 90 are likely from Texas to North Carolina. It is important to note the temperature difference between some locations. While Dodge City, Kansas, will reach the upper 90s on Sunday, Denver could be stuck in the 60s. New York City will have a damp, 50-degree day, while temperatures will be in the low 90s in Charlotte, North Carolina. These temperatures vary nearly 20 to 30 degrees over just a couple hundred miles.Some of this warmth will finally make it back into the Northeast by Tuesday with a summer-like day for District of Columbia and New York City.Rain soaks FloridaA slow-moving disturbance is currently developing in the Gulf of Mexico with a track toward the coast by midweek. This system is poorly organized and lacks a true tropical structure.However, the disturbance should bring rounds of tropical showers to Florida over the coming days. Widespread rainfall totals of 4 inches or higher are likely across much of the state. Isolated flooding could become a concern, but Florida is capable of handling a good deal of rain, and areas of South Florida are currently dealing with moderate to severe drought conditions. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Third Indian Coast Guard’s FPV Launched at Cochin Shipyard

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first_img Third Indian Coast Guard’s FPV Launched at Cochin Shipyard Back to overview,Home naval-today Third Indian Coast Guard’s FPV Launched at Cochin Shipyard View post tag: Guard May 31, 2013 View post tag: News by topic Share this article View post tag: launched View post tag: shipyard View post tag: FPV View post tag: Patrol View post tag: India View post tag: Navy View post tag: Cochin View post tag: Defence View post tag: third Authorities View post tag: Naval Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL) launched the third Fast Patrol Vessel (FPV), being built for the Indian Coast Guard (ICG), on May 28. The vessel bearing yard Hull No. BY 503 was launched by Smt. Nina Paul Antony, in the presence of DIG Satish Chandran, TM, COM DIS 4 and DIG TP Sadanandan, CGRPS (K) of Indian Coast Guard.Commodore K. Subramaniam, C&MD, CSL, Shri Paul Antony, Chairman, Cochin Port Trust, Senior Officials of the Coast Guard, Indian Navy and Cochin Shipyard Ltd., were also present. The vessel was named ‘ABHINAV’ by Smt Nina Paul Antony.The launch was a visual spectacle in its innovativeness. With the Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC) occupying the building dock, the Fast patrol Vessel weighing 120 tons placed on specially designed cradles at the dock had been hoisted by the gantry crane and transported over the entire length of the IAC, before being lowered into the water. This unique method is another example of the Shipyard`s quest to find innovative solutions.The vessel is the third in a series of 20 FPVs contracted by CSL for the ICG. The contract was signed in 2010 with delivery of the last vessel slated for 2017. The vessels are being built under the dual classification requirements of ABS and IRS. The 50 metre x 7.6 metre x 4.65 metre vessels have a designed speed of 33 knots. The primary role of the vessel includes fisheries protection and monitoring, patrol within exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and coastal patrol, anti smuggling, search and rescue operations and anti piracy operations. The vessels have a secondary role of providing communication link & escort of convoys during hostilities and war time.These high speed Fast Patrol Vessels, though small in size, are extremely complex and technologically challenging. The ships are propelled by water jets to attain a speed of 33 knots. The high speed boats are weight sensitive and integrate extensive amount of Aluminium in the super structure. Cochin Shipyard has developed special techniques to ensure high quality welding and fabrication of the Aluminium structures.Cochin Shipyard presently has 25 ships on order consisting of 20 Fast Patrol Vessels, 3 Offshore Support ships for Indian and foreign owners, 1 Buoy Tender vessel for the Department of Lighthouses and Lightships and the Prestigious Aircraft Carrier for the Indian Navy.[mappress]Press Release, May 31, 2013; Image: CSL View post tag: vessel View post tag: Indian View post tag: coastlast_img

Attorney General Curtis Hill Warns Hoosiers of ‘Grandparent Scams’

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first_img Attorney General Curtis Hill today is urging Indiana senior citizens to be vigilant as complaints of “grandparent scams” are becoming more common at the Office of the Indiana Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division (CPD).Seniors, specifically those who have grandchildren, have become primary targets for scammers – and “grandparent scams” are just the latest evidence of this trend. “Grandparent scams” occur when a senior receives a call, email or Facebook message from a scammer claiming to be their high-school- or college-age grandchild, stating that they are in danger or have an emergency. The common thread is a plea for money – often upwards of thousands of dollars. In 2016, the CPD received 90 “grandparent scam” complaints through the first four months of the year. In 2017, however, the CPD has already received 130 complaints regarding “grandparent scams.”Scammers will contact a senior posing as the senior’s grandchild, claiming to be on vacation and needing money because they have been arrested, are in the hospital or have been robbed. When the scammer attempts to take advantage of the senior by phone, the scam is especially hard to spot because of the details used by the scammer — often leaving elders confused, scared and worried. The scammer will have done necessary research to present themselves as the senior’s real grandchild. The scammer will know the names of other family members in order to sound more convincing. These details are often pulled from Facebook or online obituaries. The call often occurs in the middle of the night to take advantage of the elder being tired and confused. The caller will sound distressed and panicked.The scammer then asks the senior to send money – usually many thousands of dollars – to help them get out of jail or pay a hospital bill.  The scammer often will ask the senior, or grandparent of the child they are posing as, to wire the money via Western Union or MoneyGram to a friend or attorney. Believing that they are helping their grandchild, the senior will send money — which is often routed to an overseas location.  Another method is to ask the elder to purchase gift cards and send the scammer the codes.  If the senior falls for the scam and sends something, the scammer, or fake grandchild, will call a second time claiming a new emergency that requires more money.Because scammers often find their victims using data from online sources such as Facebook, consumers – especially seniors — are urged to review their Facebook privacy settings to ensure information is only shared with their friends and family. If someone calls you claiming to be a family member and asks for money, always verify the request is legitimate before you send money. Hang up the phone and call the family member believed to be requesting this assistance. If you receive a message or email, follow the same steps and call the family member believed to have reached out to you.Another method is to ask the scammer questions that would be easy for the real grandchild to answer but difficult for a scammer to guess. Even if the scammer claims the situation is an emergency, there is always time to verify the situation before sending any money. Ask specific questions such as “Where did you go to elementary school?” or “Where were we the last time we saw each other?”Indiana senior citizens who believe they were targeted by a grandparent scam can call the Attorney General Consumer Protection Division at (800)-382-5516 or (317)-232-6330 or file a complaint at IndianaConsumer.com.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Speech: The future of UK aid post-Brexit

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first_imgAs we leave the EU, in time we will have more flexibility to consider how we use our aid budget and the £1.5 billion we currently channel through the EU on an annual basis.Taking back control over our development funds we have that opportunity. We want to use our aid to mobilise the private investment needed to fill the financing gap needed to deliver the Global Goals, tackling the barriers that prevent more investment flowing into developing countries.Some other countries’ approach to development depends heavily on state finance and sovereign loans. Our approach is different – to mobilise private investment to support development. This results in driving innovation, increased competition and sustainable growth, while meeting high social and environmental standards.And we are developing a new partnership, with the City of London Corporation, in designing new financing mechanisms that will help mobilise more investment for poorer countries and support the creation of the 18 million new jobs a year which Africa needs.This is in our national interest, allowing the City to expand its role as a financing hub for the developing world. 111 African companies have already listed on the London Stock Exchange, and as we saw from the Prime Minister’s visit to Africa, many more are keen to join them.This new approach will also help promote security and stability. It’s a win for the developing world and it’s a win for the UK.But it will also deliver a more explicit win by helping address some of the priorities of the British people.We want to give British savers a chance to make a financial return in exchange for their goodwill to change the world for the better.I want people to have more information about how their savings are used and the opportunities available to them to invest in things that they care about.Why can’t British people go to their Bank and invest their savings and pension in products that will invest in the Global Goals? Or open an app on their phone, and select which Goals they’d most like to invest in?And to give ordinary people the power to hold companies to account, they will need accurate information on how their money is used and the impact that it delivers.After the Great Depression, common accounting standards were developed to ensure that, in future, businesses reported their financial performances consistently and accurately. And now, at the start of the 21st century we need common standards for reporting impact: compassion as well as compliance.And that is why I helped to launch the World Benchmarking Alliance at the United Nations General Assembly last month, which will rank companies on their contributions to the Global Goals.We want to make it easier for companies to embed eco-social considerations alongside financial ones, in order to drive inclusive and sustainable growth.And we are working with experts and investors to standardise how the social and environmental impact of investment is measured and flagged to the public.And I want to listen to ideas of the British public. So today I am announcing that we will launch a new national conversation to find out more about how the British people might want their savings and pension to be used to support the Global Goals and end poverty.And we will use some of our aid budget working with banks, pension funds and other investors to give the British people the choices they want, and opportunities for good returns on their investments.So what is the logical conclusion of all this?Investing in developing countries in Africa and Asia helps to build the markets of the future and for UK businesses as we look to forge new trading partnerships. This is sustainable development.The more we do, the more we can trade, the more we can trade the less demand there will be for aid.What if we mobilised 1%?What if every donor nation did?Over £13 trillion of goods were traded globally last year. If we could work with developing countries to help them grow their share of global trade by the equivalent of that 1% that would equate to £130 billion extra to deliver the Global Goals.And in future years as the amount of funding coming back into our own development financial instruments increases we should be open to using these profits to count towards the 0.7% and I’m exploring the scope to reinvest those funds with the DAC to maximise the value of our investments.We remain committed to 0.7%. but as we do so we should ensure the British public get a triple return on their generosity and compassion. DFID’s own investment work. For funds in the UK financial sector, and for the individual – to get something back for their efforts to deliver the global goals. This is a once in a generation opportunity.We hope others will also consider this agenda.Indeed the EU might too.If it does we are open to exploring doing this together –managing EU investments in the same way we do grants.And we bring much to the table. We stand ready to forge that deep and special partnership.It requires us all to be broad-minded, big-hearted and long-sighted.And at this historic time as we near the end of the negotiations I want the EU to use its head and its heart.Thank you. a personal return to them a stronger Britain and a more prosperous and stable world. Good morning and welcome.And can I start by just saying my thoughts and the thoughts of my department are with Indonesia, still recovering from the terrible earthquake and tsunami. Britain stands side by side with the Indonesian people, and we are doing all we can to help with the relief effort.Thank you all for coming today.So why have I brought you to CDC?Because I have a message for our country, for our European Nation partners and to the European Commission as we enter a crucial stage of the Brexit negotiations.I’m going to talk about the possibilities of our future development relationship, our common objectives and our respective offers.And I have some specific announcements about our thinking at UK aid as we leave the EU: how we will close the resource gap to deliver the UN Global Goals and at the same time make our nation and its citizens stronger and more financially secure. What I have to say is based on our national values.CDC – DFID’s private sector investment arm – is a metaphor for those values and my message today.It’s a British success story, the oldest financial institution in the World founded at the same time as the Universal Declaration of Human rights, and our NHS, it’s 70 years old this year. And it has a long running history of investing in growing businesses that transform economies across the developing world. And it has a bright and exciting future as it scales up investments across Africa and South Asia.CDC is a clear example of the reciprocal beam engine of compassion and capital that is Britain:Compassion and Capital.Heart and mind.Our nation is a powerhouse of commerce and wealth creation, and the unselfish values that have created both our public services and the third sector.Last year, the UK financial services sector contributed £119 billion to the UK economy, 6.5% of our total economic output. There are 1.1 million financial services jobs in the UK, 3.2% of all jobs. And the city of London, 50% of our financial services sector, is consistently ranked as the most important financial centre in the world.At the other end of the British beam engine, we have the distribution engines of which overseas aid is one part. Britain’s charitable sector alone comprises over 166,000 organisations with more than 15,000 being international or development focussed. With an annual income of £47 billion, it is highly professional and the oldest charitable sector in the world. The size of its workforce, 800,000, is roughly 3% of total UK jobs – a similar size to the financial services sector.And the relationship between these two sectors is fundamental: compassion requires capital, and capital requires compassion.One sector is drawing on the know-how of a thousand different professions. And the other creates a network of compassion that provides government services and support both at home and overseas.One helps create the conditions of the other’s success.The 0.7 % – whether you agree with it or not – also makes that point.To spend it we have to make it.And to make it we have to spend it.And our ambition for both capital and compassion is not limited to our shores.As well as being the fifth largest economy in the world we have made the world a wealthier place.Our economy is innately international because it was based on ancient routes of international trade. Our modern infrastructures have continued this tradition in shipping, airlines, roads, British law and even time itself.Our reach and our technical expertise is central to our offer as a partner.This trade and wealth creation combined with compassion has been largely responsible for global wealth.And it is not just because of the technical things we know, it’s the things we believe in, it’s our values.The UK is one of the most generous countries in the world, and leads Europe, not just in terms of how much we give, but also in terms of how many of us give, both in our time and in our money.Every month 13 million people in the UK volunteer, one in three gives to charity, and purchase ethical products and produce. And one in every £8 donated to charity is for helping overseas.This is people in all parts of the UK, from all social backgrounds and all ages.The Disasters Emergency Committee last week launched an appeal to raise money for the survivors of the Indonesia earthquake and tsunami. Like their appeal for the Rohingya last year, I have no doubt that this one will raise millions in weeks from voluntary contributions from the public, wanting to help people on the other side of the world, who they will never meet and who they will never know. The predictability of the British public’s response makes it no less impressive.And we’ve always been this way, and that is why our charity sector is so old and so unique.Our qualities, habits and institutions are the things that make us a great nation, as do the actions of individuals who believe that they can make a difference.We value partnership, we bring technical knowledge of our professions, and we bring the values of a compassionate global nation.And it’s that collective action that defines us, our desire not to sit back and watch from the side lines, but to get stuck in, to help, to lead, to fight and to make the world a better place and to protect the weak. Look at the humanitarian crises around the world, and we, more often than not, are leading the response. Look at who have been the innovators and look at who have been the trail blazers.Our contribution to the progress of humanity has been immense, and in the last few decades in particular. And the qualities that we stand for have made the world a better place: international cooperation, free trade, democracy, capitalism, international humanitarian law, property rights, scientific and medical discovery, and freedom.And be in no doubt, we will be crucial to the future progress of the world too. Without DFID, the best development department in the world, bar none, without our NGOs and our charities, many of them the best in their field, and without all our nation has to offer, its institutions, it financial sector, its creative law, its innovation, its entrepreneurs and its scientists, we won’t deliver the Global Goals.We are the margin of victory, we should be the partner of choice.What we will finalise in the coming weeks will not just be the foundations of an economic partnership.I know what we bring to the table.Many nations are internationalist, Britain is truly global.Brexit was never about withdrawing from the world, it was about engaging with it more and more directly.And at the moment when humanity has so many new opportunities to advance its progress through technology, through scientific breakthroughs, we would be foolish to abandon those values that have helped lift billions out of poverty and changed the course of so many lives.But there is a danger so-called populism, rising nationalism, protectionism and a lack of trust in the international system are philosophies which seeking to get traction.And many of those who would try to turn us away from those qualities that have secured humanity’s progress have sought to claim victory in the success of the Leave campaign, and that great exercise in democracy which the EU referendum represented.They have sought to explain why people voted to leave the EU, claiming to know the motivation of millions of Britons. And they have attributed the victory to base beliefs and desires which they know are contrary to the values and the feelings of the majority of the British people.None of us can look into the souls of our fellow countrymen and women, but I can say that during the referendum campaign I spoke to huge numbers of people, about their views and their feelings. Many Leave voters were motivated by democracy, by accountable government, by sovereignty, by politics as the servant not the master of the people, by international co-operation and by wanting to reach out to the wider world as their nation. And yes a feeling that they had been left behind—that they, their ambitions for their family, were not the politicians’ priorities.They were motivated by hope and by optimism.Just as remain voters were too.Not surprising really. As only the optimistic vote.The very fact that we had a referendum, that we had the debate, that we had the vote, that we have democracy is a sign of our strength and the qualities that we value.I want us to recognise that our leaving the EU has been done in good faith: it was a noble and hopeful act,Brexit was down to good British people, not bad boys.And throughout the negotiations our nation’s conduct has been one of fairness and generosity, most recently in providing reassurance to EU citizens who live in the UK.But now we are at a critical time in the negotiations, and we must remember that Brexit is also about the head and the heart.We must honour the result of the referendum. The public decided, and we must implement their views.Last week the Prime Minister rightly outlined the outrage that would justifiably follow any attempt to derail or fudge the implementation of that decision. But I believe in honouring the result, we must also honour the motives and ambition of that historic decision.Over the last year there has been a mischaracterisation of the British people and their reasons for choosing to leave. You’d be wrong to interpret Brexit as protectionist, nationalist, or selfish.Just as you’d be wrong to interpret the scepticism some of the public have about some aspects of UK aid to a lack of love or logic on their part.Brexiteers and aid sceptics are not uncaring selfish ‘little Englanders’. Indeed it is often those who give the greatest percentage of their incomes to help others.As I have evidenced the British people are pragmatic, outward looking, generous and kind. We know this to be true from their achievements and their actions in helping others.It is just that they believe that it is not government that binds nations together, it is trade and our common humanity. It is not government that employs people it’s business. It is not government that has all the power, it is the people. It is not governments that enable compassion, it is the people and their taxes. And if the people tell you what they want, they don’t want a government that punishes them for it. They just want you to get on with it.Governments are not the master. The people are.So what does Brexit mean for my area of development?As we have set out after we leave the EU we still want to help promote development in Europe and in the neighbourhood.ODA will continue to support development and stability within the EU and around its immediate borders: in the Western Balkans, in Ukraine and in the refugee camps in Turkey and Greece. But also further afield in North Africa and Libya too.CDC alone backed businesses that created over 1 million new direct and indirect jobs in Africa and South Asia last year, and those livelihoods are a fundamental and necessary condition to reduce and halt migrant flows.We have contributed much, both in Europe and elsewhere to address the security and prosperity concerns the continent has beyond its borders. And we have invested in addressing some of the most fragile situations for example our peacekeeping and humanitarian work. And we have worked jointly on new kinds of development financing to attract more sustainable investments into some of the most fragile states.And of course we contributed £1.5 billion per annum to the EU’s own development pot.And we want to still help – in the neighbourhood and beyond. It is in our interest to do so. Especially on migration, humanitarian, peace work and on security, but as I have stated only if we have control over the way that work is managed, and British NGOs are not discriminated against.Of course, we expect to get a good deal, but as a responsible government we are prepared for every eventuality.That is why I have said that in order to give British NGOs bidding for humanitarian projects reassurance, and EU procurement the confidence it needs to award contracts to British NGOs, I will use money which I would have paid to joint initiatives in the future, to fund these contracts in a no deal scenario.Deal or no deal, Brexit gives us a huge opportunity to take our development work to a new level.I have sought to reset how we do UK aid with the people’s priorities at its heart.Not isolationist, not protectionist or nationalistic as some would paint them, but generous, pragmatic, with pressing concerns about their own families and opportunities.Where we go post-Brexit must have at its heart the people’s priorities.I have set a higher spending bar for the department: we must ensure that aid money is not just spent well but could not be spent better. And this includes looking at what countries could afford to do themselves.We have tackled the dogma and culture that still exists in some parts of the aid sector, which not only sees organisations failing to put the beneficiaries first but also preventing the private sector from helping deliver those Global Goals.We have carried out a reset of what the department does, both improving the quality of our work to alleviate poverty, but also getting our funding to work twice as hard by benefiting the national interest more explicitly. The win-win agenda.And we have sought to improve the coherence of ODA across the UK government.What we do now is smarter, it is more effective, it is more sustainable. It is a better way to make progress and it makes better use of the new opportunities we have to speed up our progress towards delivering the Global Goals.But today I want to outline some radical next steps, including how my department will make the opportunity of Brexit deliver for Britain and help eradicate extreme poverty worldwide.In one very obvious sense charity does begin at home because unless the UK is prosperous and its people financially secure, unless we have influence and power, we cannot help others.Creating wealth for both our country and individual citizens is a necessary part of being able to be generous to others.We will use the opportunity of Brexit, our aid budget, our unique investment expertise and financial services sector to make the British people more financially secure and to end extreme poverty. We will harness the huge opportunities in Asia and Africa.Global Britain wants mutual prosperity; based on British values.And I want to use our development programmes to help build the foundation of a more inclusive global economy.We have just over a decade left to deliver the Global Goals – and we are off track and face a financing gap of $2.5 trillion per year.Together, traditional donor governments gave around $150 billion in aid last year. And that’s significant, but it’s a tiny fraction of the total sum needed.So how do we close that gap? The private sector has to be part of the answer.During her Africa trip the Prime Minister announced that Britain will host a UK-Africa Investment Summit in 2019. We want to be Africa’s partner of choice for investment.And the opportunities are huge.The City of London manages over £8 trillion worth of assets but little is invested in the poorer countries. Even a small increase would have a huge impact on these economies. For example, if we could redirect just 1% of those assets to investment opportunities in Africa, that would generate additional investment of around $110 billion. By contrast, global aid flows to Africa last year were worth just $50 billion.When British investors are struggling to find good returns, these markets also offer good opportunities and pension holders too. For example, CDC has achieved a 7% annual return in sterling over the last six years while investing in developing countries, including older investments in China and Latin America. If done well, the opportunity for British investors is significant.And my department is already doing a lot to mobilise private investment for the poorest countries. CDC is doing good while making money. It uses its expertise and capital to build stronger businesses that create jobs, generate taxes and develop new products and services. Last year it made over £1bn of new investment commitments and backed businesses to directly employ 735,000 people.This year we have established the Green Growth Equity Fund with the Indian government. A UK investment vehicle of £120m, matched by the Indian government’s contribution, will mobilise up to £260m additional of private finance, including from the City of London. And this will be used to finance green infrastructure projects with a positive impact to the environment and catalysing the green energy sector, and delivering a return to the UK.And earlier this year, the UK played a leading role in encouraging the World Bank Group’s International Finance Corporation to boost the share of its support going to the poorest countries in its planned capital increase. This will support a doubling of investment in sub-Saharan Africa to between $10 and 12 billion a year by 2030. And earlier the World Bank Group’s International Development Association launched its first bonds on the markets, raising $1.5bn of additional finance to the world’s poorest countries.Over the past two years we have worked with our partners also to shift the dial on international aid rules, allowing our aid budget to help the private sector invest in sustainable development more than ever before. And I will continue to work with our partners at the Organisation For Economic Cooperation and Development to make sure the aid rules incentivise private sector investment where it’s needed: this is the only way we are going to collectively deliver the financing necessary to meet the Global Goals.The UK has been a pioneer in social impact investing – investing for positive impact as well as for financial return – over the last 15 years.And in 2012, we launched Big Society Capital, to grow the domestic impact investment market.And during its G8 presidency, the UK established a Social Impact Taskforce and National Advisory Board for impact investing – doing good while making money – to take the idea global.Impact investing returns have proven comparable returns to commercial investments.Investment opportunities in the developing work offer new opportunities for:last_img read more

Oteil Burbridge Recruits Bernard Purdie, John Medeski, Col. Bruce Hampton, & More For Roots Rock Revival

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first_imgMusic Masters Camps’ fifth annual Roots Rock Revival will take place from August 14-18 at Full Moon Resort in the heart of the “Forever Wild” Catskill Forest Preserve in upstate New York. The camp was created by the late drummer Butch Trucks, founding member of the Allman Brothers Band, in conjunction with bassist Oteil Burbridge (formerly ABB, now Dead & Company), and brothers Luther Dickinson and Cody Dickinson of the North Mississippi Allstars to bring fans and musicians together to explore the world of the Southern Blues Rock movement, the Allman Brothers Band, and the music that forms the foundation of Rock ‘n Roll. Despite the sudden death of Trucks, Roots Rock Revival will go on in his memory.In addition to Burbridge and the Dickinson brothers, the 2017 lineup includes legendary sessions drummer Bernard Purdie, jazz keyboardist John Medeski, former Allman Brothers slide guitarist Jack Pearson, the “grandfather of jam scene” Col. Bruce Hampton, jazz drummer Johnny Vidacovich, DJ Logic, and Midnight North’s Grahame Lesh (son of Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh).Beyond the master classes, there will be talent from previous years, members of Butch Trucks’ Freight Train Band, Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds, and more on site to assist in the organization of jam rooms. There for your benefit will be Vaylor Trucks, Berry Oakley Jr., Ryan Montbleau, Jackson Kincheloe, Brandon Niederauer, Heather Gillis, Brian Graham, Phil Rodriguez, Craig Keil, and James Beihn. Brandon “Taz” Niederauer has attended all four previous years of Roots Rock Revival, and will be returning for his 5th year to demonstrate the etiquette of jamming amongst his fellow young musicians. It was at Roots Rock Revival that Taz was “discovered,” and the 14-year-old prodigy will attest that much of his success came from the relationships he made at this camp.Whether you’re a campfire player, a full-time musician, or a passionate music fan, this experience offers the opportunity to dive deep into the world of your favorite musical artists. Roots Rock Revival will feature not only outstanding music, but also three gourmet meals a day. Bountiful and fresh, the menu features many locally grown ingredients and a full spectrum of exceptional catering from the arrival Meet and Greet to the farewell breakfast.Eat, drink, jam and immerse yourself in music with the masters! Five days and four nights of memories and inspiration at Full Moon Resort, an enchantingly unique facility offering over one hundred acres of mountains, meadows, forests and streams. This gorgeous setting has proven time and again to be a perfect host for these inspiring and memorable events. Sign up today and learn more about the event here.last_img read more

Jason Isbell Brings Heart & Soul To Savannah Music Festival

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first_imgJason Isbell, Grammy-winning guitarist and pride of Alabama, brought his band The 400 Unit to the closing day of the Savannah Music Festival to share his songs of hope and defiance. Isbell’s trademark blend of earnest and soulful lyrics and devil-may-care playing style allows him to take on any subject with a musical confidence that is both rare and a pleasure to behold. Whatever Isbell is giving listeners, it is instantly obvious that he truly believes his own message, and that type of honesty is very attractive.Since bursting on the scene with The Drive-By Truckers, Isbell has built himself a rock-solid reputation as a singer-songwriter and a fiery guitarist that follows his own vision. Though Isbell clearly views his backing band with great trust and affection, he takes the majority of each song’s burden on his own back. This he does this without ego, and his singular sound gives each song an idiosyncratic bent that makes them stand out.As part of the Savannah Music Festival’s first-ever closing event at the brand new Trustees’ Gardens in downtown Savannah, Isbell and company got to share the stage with a wonderful selection of Americana artists like the Tedeschi Trucks Band, Gillian Welch, Brett Dennen, and many more. Though he only had an hour, Isbell’s set was a fine sample of what is to come on his just-announced tour and a fine slice of music bliss for old fans and new alike. Check out our video highlights from Isbell’s set at the fest in the clips below!Setlist: Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit | Savannah Music Festival | Savannah, GA | 4/14/2018Set One: Anxiety, Hope The High Road, 24 Frames, White Man’s World, Decoration Day, Codeine, Molotov, Cumberland Gap, Tupelo, Last Of My Kind, Alabama Pines, Flying Over Water, Cover Me Up, If We Were Vampireslast_img read more

Budget ‘sequestration’ will hurt vital health care functions

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first_img Read Full Story The U.S. health sector and the health of Americans will suffer numerous adverse effects from budget “sequestration,” writes Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) health care policy expert John McDonough in a March 20, 2013 article in the New England Journal of Medicine. Under this “sequestration”—the result of the inability of Congress and President Barack Obama to agree by March 1, 2013 on a plan to reduce the national budget deficit—the budget must be trimmed across-the-board in most federal agencies by $85 billion for the final seven months of fiscal year 2013.McDonough heads the Center for Public Health Leadership at HSPH and is professor of the practice of public health.Programs to be cut include Medicare funding, which will be trimmed by nearly $12 million through reductions in payments to hospitals, physicians, other health care providers, and some insurers; the National Institutes of Health, facing $1.6 billion in cuts that will delay or halt vital scientific projects; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which predicts having to significantly cut back HIV tests, immunizations, tuberculosis programs, and other programs that track infections and foodborne disease outbreaks. Other agencies affected include the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, which will cut mental health services for adults and children offered through its Mental Health Block Grant program; and the Indian Health Service, which will serve thousands fewer in both inpatient admissions and outpatient visits.last_img read more