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Public figures remember Fr. Hesburgh

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first_imgBarack Obama, 44th President of the United States“Michelle and I were saddened to learn of the passing of Father Ted Hesburgh.  During his lifetime of service to his country, his church, and his beloved University of Notre Dame, Father Hesburgh inspired generations of young men and women to lead with the courage of their convictions.  His deep and abiding faith in a loving God, and in the power of our shared humanity, led him to join the first-ever United States Civil Rights Commission, and join hands with Dr. King to sing ‘We Shall Overcome.’  His belief that what unites us is greater than what divides us made him a champion of academic freedom and open debate.“When I delivered the commencement address at Notre Dame in 2009, I was honored to thank Father Hesburgh for his contributions to our country and our world.  Father Hesburgh often spoke of his beloved university as both a lighthouse and a crossroads – the lighthouse standing apart, shining with the wisdom of the Catholic tradition, and the crossroads joining the differences of culture, religion and conviction with friendship, civility, and love. The same can be said of the man generations of students knew simply as ‘Father Ted.’  Our thoughts and prayers are with his family, his friends, and the Notre Dame community that loved him so dearly.”Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the United States“Hillary and I mourn the passing and celebrate the remarkable life of Father Hesburgh. His brilliant stewardship of Notre Dame produced generations of leaders and scholars whose hearts and minds were shaped by his example. Hillary and I were proud to call him friend and counselor, and I was honored to present his Congressional Gold Medal. We will always remember his great sense of humor and his dauntless faith, his staunch advocacy for civil rights and a peaceful planet, and his lifelong commitment to public service. His entire life was a constant reminder of our common humanity. Our prayers are with his family, the Notre Dame family, and his legion of friends throughout the world.”Condoleezza Rice, former Secretary of StateMA, Class of 1975“This is a day of both personal sadness and celebration of a singular life. I will sorely miss Father Ted, my friend and mentor of 40 years. His commitment to education and social justice was infectious and I am grateful for having experienced his common touch, his sense of humor, his love of learning and his passion for Notre Dame.“When my father died, Father Hesburgh wrote to me that my dad was now ‘resting in the loving hands of our savior, bathed in the light of eternal life.’ Now too, does our beloved friend.“Rest well, Father Ted. You showed us what it meant to be a faithful servant and made our country and the world a better place. Your memory and spirit will live on at Notre Dame and in each of us who had the honor to know and love you.”John Boehner, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives“Father Ted was truly a man of God and the people.  As the Kipling poem goes, he could walk with kings and not lose the common touch.  Through his service, he showed us all the possibilities of the heart, and of complete  devotion to God.  For his many contributions, he became the first leader in higher education to be awarded the Congressional Gold Medal.  Now he receives the reward of eternal rest.  I extend the condolences of the whole House to the Hesburgh family, the Congregation of Holy Cross, and the University of Notre Dame.  The passing of this fine priest is a loss for us all.”Nancy Pelosi, Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives“Father Theodore Martin Hesburgh dedicated his life to justice and peace.  Each and every day, President Hesburgh fulfilled the calling of St. Francis to ‘preach the gospel, and sometimes use words’ by living his faith through his incredible service.  As a dedicated member of the clergy, outstanding educator, caring humanitarian and civil rights champion, he leaves behind a towering legacy of leadership – inspiring all of us to keep fighting for a world that honors the spark of divinity that rests in everyone.“Father Hesburgh never abandoned the spirit of volunteerism that led him to serve as a Navy Chaplain during the Second World War – and that earned him the position of Honorary Navy Chaplain towards the end of his life.  World War II forced Father Hesburgh to abandon his studies in Italy, but he never abandoned his call to minister to people suffering from war and injustice.  He marched arm in arm with Rev. Martin L. King, Jr. in support of the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act.  He led the Civil Rights Commission and advocated for the Affordable Care Act to improve the lives of America’s families.  His legendary tenure at the University of Notre Dame, from his start as a chaplain for married veterans to his 35 years as University President, was an extension of the ministry he cherished: empowering generations of young men and women to create purposeful lives.“On the streets, in classrooms, and in boardrooms, Father Ted was courageous enough to speak out against injustice, compassionate enough to bring healing to the downtrodden, and creative enough to propose ideas that improved the lives of all people.  May it be a comfort to all who loved Rev. Hesburgh, that so many share in their grief during this sad time.”Jackie Walorski, U.S. Representative, Indiana’s 2nd District“The news of Father Hesburgh’s passing is a profound loss not only for our community, but also for the entire country. Today we mourn a great man, a beloved priest, and one of the most influential leaders in higher education.  I send my heartfelt condolences to his family and the entire Notre Dame community.”Lou Anna Simon, President of Michigan State University“The passing of Ted Hesburgh has touched us all very deeply. We here at Michigan State University are especially saddened by his death. The University of Notre Dame and Michigan State University have been and always will be inextricably connected in so many ways.“Nowhere else is this connection more alive than in the relationship that existed between Father Hesburgh and former MSU President John Hannah. I don’t think it’s an understatement to say both men are 20th-century legends. One turned a great Catholic university into a Catholic great university. The other turned a great land-grant university into a land-grant great university.“But beyond their extraordinary contributions to higher education and the pursuit of knowledge, both men established themselves as leaders in the fight for civil rights and the dignity of all human beings. Dr. Hannah chaired the first Civil Rights Commission, established in 1954 by President Dwight Eisenhower. Father Hesburgh was a member of that group.“The commission made recommendations to eliminate discrimination in areas such as education, voting and housing. The commission overcame its political differences and presented to President Johnson the framework for the 1964 Civil Rights Act.“It’s also important to note that Father Hesburgh was president of Notre Dame in 1972, the year the university became a co-educational institution, allowing women the same opportunity as men to pursue a better life through higher education.“We were honored to have Father Hesburgh visit Michigan State many times. Few will forget his commencement address to graduating Spartans. It was during the unrest of the 1960s when he shocked parents by telling them their kids needed two things from them: “Give them love and laughter.”“Early on when I was provost at MSU, I had dinner with Father Hesburgh. We talked about a wide range of issues, including social justice. It was absolutely extraordinary to hear his reflections on the connections and partnerships with MSU that were value-centric.“He embodied a unique combination of reflection, strength and action. It’s hard to imagine the number of lives positively impacted by his work over the years.” [View the story “Public figures remember Fr. Hesburgh” on Storify]Tags: Hesburgh, public figures, tweetslast_img read more

Two high-flyers break from Fortress

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Gangs force sex trade on underage girls

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first_imgAuckland Now 12 Sep 2012Underage Maori and Pacific Island sex workers are caught up in illegal prostitution in Auckland, the head of a prostitute support service says.Debbie Baker, from Streetreach, which encourages women to leave prostitution, told Police News that 14 to 16-year-old girls were being pushed into prostitution by gangs to pay off debts.They were so scared of the gangs they would never admit the connection to police, she said.Baker gave examples of one girl who was forced to have sex at Black Power pads around the country to pay off drug debts, and another who was taken from Tauranga to Auckland to work in a brothel.The girl was locked in a room and Baker said she never saw any of the money for the whole time she worked there.It was very difficult for police to uncover the gang’s influence because girls were too scared to acknowledge it.“This fear is often far stronger than the fear they feel for police or other government agencies, as they are often threatened or stood-over, making it even harder for Police and other authorities to prove what’s going on,” Baker said.Acting area commander for Manurewa Inspector Richard Wilkie said police in South Auckland were doing all they could to address the problem of underage prostitution.There were regular stings of popular hangouts like Northcrest and Hunter’s Corner and as a result he said they were picking up fewer people than in previous months.Wilkie said police intelligence suggested gangs were the main force behind the illegal trade.http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/7654574/Gangs-force-sex-trade-on-underage-girlslast_img read more

HSO, SCIA host celebration of Diwali

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first_imgFestival of lights · Students listen to Bharathwaj Nandakumar lead the Pooja, a prayer, at a celebration of Diwali hosted by the Hindu Student Organization and Southern California Indo-Americans. – Mariya Dondonyan | Daily TrojanThe Hindu Student Organization and Southern California Indo-Americans hosted a celebration of Diwali on Tuesday in the Ronald Tutor Campus Center Ballroom.Within 10 minutes of the doors opening at 6:40 p.m., nearly half of the tables were filled with students, faculty and staff.Diwali, which means “festival of lights,” is a Hindu festival that celebrates the triumph of good over evil. The festival, celebrated in autumn, is one of the largest in India. Many people arrived in regular clothing; however, some arrived in traditional Indian garb.The program began with welcoming addresses by Varun Soni, dean of Religious Life, and Rev. Jim Burklo, associate dean of Religious Life.After the speeches, everyone took off their shoes and gathered around the altar as Bharathwaj Nandakumar led the Pooja, or prayer.Eena Singh, an academic advisor for the Marshall School of Business, then offered a reflection of what Diwali meant to her.“Diwali is more than just the festival of lights,” she said. “It signifies the will to have peace in the world, to strive for freedom and to maintain strength in your character because you have to believe that good will triumph over evil.”Performances then began as volunteers from SCIA and HSO ushered the guests to candle-lit tables to enjoy traditional Indian food. From Indian dance routines to music, performers demonstrated their talent and celebrated their culture.Students clapped their hands and sang along as the Alaap Group, composed of Yogesh Bhosale and Apoorva Mahabaleshwara, graduate students studying computer science, performed a medley of a traditional and Bollywood song.“We are really fortunate that we can represent Indian music here,” said Bhosale, a keyboardist. “It was my dream to perform music in the United States and USC.”Freshman Joel Sigal, an aerospace engineering student, attended the event with freshman business administration major Siri Balusu.Sigal said he especially enjoyed the second-to-last performance, covers of Bollywood songs.“They were very engaging with the audience,” Sigal said.The night ended in a performance by DJ Bhagyashree Pujar.According to Sowmy Krishnakumar, a graduate student studying computer science and a HSO member, the organization started planning their Diwali celebration a month ago, and formed their partnership with SCIA around December of last year.“It is our biggest event of the year so we had to plan a lot in advance,” he said.Krishnakumar said that Soni encouraged HSO to collaborate with SCIA for the event.“We thought, ‘Why make two separate Diwali celebrations when we could make a big Diwali event which could probably reach more people?’” he said.Through Diwali celebrations are an annual affair for Balusu, she said she really enjoyed the festivities.“It’s been a long time since I’ve been completely immersed in Indian culture,” she said. “It was nice to retrace my roots and re-experience what really is a big part of my life through not just the food, but the performances and the overall vibe as well.”Though Diwali is observed mainly by Hindus, Chaitanya Amin, a graduate student studying electrical engineering and HSO’s director of public relations, believes the celebration applies to a universal audience.“Everyone always stands for good,” he said. “Everyone already stands for knowledge. Everyone stands for light. It is always appropriate, no matter what your beliefs are, because Diwali stands for good.”Burklo echoed that sentiment during his speech.“As I look out in the room now, I see a lot of light,” he said. “And so, tonight, celebrate this light which the divine has put in each of our souls, the light that shines out of our actions of compassion and kindness, interfaith harmony and understanding.”This article previously identified Bharathwaj Nandakumar as Bhaidway Nandakumar. The article also stated that the event ended with SCIA’s “Bollywood Jukebox.” The event ended with a performance by DJ Bhagyashree Pujar. The Daily Trojan regrets the errors.last_img read more