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Appeal court quashes blogger Wael Abbas’ conviction

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first_img January 22, 2021 Find out more EgyptMiddle East – North Africa Organisation Help by sharing this information EgyptMiddle East – North Africa News RSF_en Reporters Without Borders hails today’s decision by a court in the Cairo district of Hadayek El Qobba to acquit blogger Wael Abbas on appeal and quash the six-month sentence that had been imposed by a lower court.“This is a victory for netizens who express their views freely online and a setback for the government and its strategy of harassment and intimidating its critics,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We now call for justice to be rendered to the blogger Kareem Amer, who has already served two thirds of his jail sentence and who should be freed unconditionally.”——17.02.2010: Authorities urged to stop persecuting leading blogger Wael AbbasLeading Egyptian blogger Wael Abbas could see his six-month prison sentence upheld tomorrow if his appeal is rejected by the court that is due to hear it tomorrow. The sentence was imposed on 11 November by a court in the North Cairo suburb of Hadayek El Qobba after it convicted him on a charge of damaging an Internet cable.The damage was in fact caused last April by a policeman and his brother (the cable’s actual user), who were also responsible for a physical attack on Abbas.“We call for this ridiculous conviction to be overturned at once and for Wael Abbas to be acquitted,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The real aim of this trumped-up charge was to silence a well-known blogger and prevent him from continuing to expose things that embarrass the authorities. The government is showing that it is openly hostile to the free flow of information online and will stop at nothing to control it.”The persecution of Abbas is typical of the way bloggers are constantly harassed by the authorities, who fear their ability to rally the regime’s critics and galvanise them into action. Abbas has been well known ever since he posted videos of torture in Egyptian police stations on his blog.One netizen is currently imprisoned in Egypt. It is the blogger Kareem Amer, who was arrested in 2006 for posting a critical comment on an Internet forum and who was sentenced in 2007 to three years in prison on a charge of insulting the president and another year in prison on a charge of inciting hatred of Islam.Describing the case against Wael Abbas as a “manipulation of the law,” the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information today called on free speech activists in Egypt and the rest of the world to express their support for him. to go further Follow the news on Egypt Newscenter_img February 6, 2021 Find out more February 18, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Appeal court quashes blogger Wael Abbas’ conviction Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prison News News February 1, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison stafflast_img read more

From Dedeaux to the Bronx: Aaron Boone reflects on his baseball career

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first_imgYankees’ manager Aaron Boone is known for his home run in Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS, which sent the Yankees to the World Series. (Photo courtesy of USC Athletics) Still, his experience in those games would prove crucial. Though the stakes might have been a little higher, Game 7 of the ALCS wasn’t Boone’s first time playing for a ticket to the final destination.  With one swing, none of that mattered. Boone clobbered a first pitch knuckleball into the left field seats at Yankee Stadium, sending New York to the World Series. Though Aaron and Bret just missed out on donning the Cardinal and Gold together, they finally had a chance to take the field as teammates with the Cincinnati Reds in 1998. On the last day of the season, the Boones made up half of the first starting infield in baseball history comprising two sets of brothers.  Boone has made a name for himself as a manager for his willingness to get in an umpire’s face when he disagrees with a call. His most famous rant, during which he screamed at a home plate umpire, “My guys are fucking savages in that box,” has become a rallying cry for the 2019 Bronx Bombers. Boone, who was ejected from his MLB debut as a player, described himself as “pretty laid back” before conceding that “I had my moments.” “I guess it just kind of happened to work out that way,” Boone said, laughing. “I’ve loved, obviously, my ties to USC. I think people that know me know how much it means to me and how much the University means to me … I feel so proud and honored to get to come to work every day for the Pinstripes. I feel blessed [for] the opportunities that I’ve had in my lifetime in being able to chase my dreams.” Boone made the most of the opportunity to play collegiate baseball at USC. In his three years as a Trojan, Boone hit .302 with an .821 OPS to earn a third round selection by the Cincinnati Reds in the 1994 MLB Draft.  But this is the season you think of when you think of Aaron Boone. Not because of those numbers, not even because of his stellar first half with the Reds that landed him a spot on the National League All-Star team.  The Yankees were facing their archrival Red Sox in Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS. Boone was at the plate against Boston’s Tim Wakefield in the bottom of the 11th. He was in the midst of a forgettable postseason, going 5-for-31 with nine strikeouts and 1 RBI to that point.  However, that doesn’t mean that USC has no alumni who could make a potential Fall Classic run. It’s only fitting that former Trojan Aaron Boone is leading the charge for the New York Yankees as they look to add to an MLB-high 27 World Series championships, 25 years after he played for the program with double the College World Series titles of any other school in the nation. Boone, now in his second season as the Yankees’ manager, played third base at USC from 1992-1994. He is the younger brother of Bret Boone, a retired 14-year major leaguer and three-time All-Star who also played for the Trojans.  “It’s such a majestic place,” Boone said of USC. “I think they do a great job of preparing people for careers and for life after college, so to speak. Not just me and baseball — I think it’s just something that the University has always done well, and it’s a great place to have gone to school.”  But now, with father and son on the same team, the circumstances were different. Most people would find Boone’s situation peculiar and, at times, slightly uncomfortable, but that’s not how it played out.  It’s one of the most famous moments in baseball history, and it came out of nowhere — a surprising feat considering Boone’s lack of postseason experience (in the majors, at least). The father-son duo in Cincinnati was short-lived. After two-and-a-half subpar seasons, the elder Boone was fired midway through the 2003 season. Just three days later, Aaron was traded to the Yankees.  The two had shared a clubhouse before. When Aaron was a toddler, Bob was a catcher for the Philadelphia Phillies. The future Yankees manager routinely hung out in the Veterans Stadium clubhouse with his father and his teammates — including Steve Carlton, Mike Schmidt and Pete Rose — who often got a kick out of Aaron’s impersonations of various Phillies.  It’s the year when Boone became an October legend. Though Aaron claims to have been a Trojan fan before his brother started college in 1988, he admitted that continuing the family tradition made his time at USC all the more special.  Now, Boone finds himself back where he’s spent a good chunk of his life: in the dugout. From playing third base at USC to taking over as the manager of baseball’s most famous franchise, it’s clear that Boone can’t seem to keep out of the spotlight.  “One of the things I’m so grateful [for] with my dad is he always took us with him,” Boone said. “We were always at the park with him, so we got to know and be around so many great guys, got to do so many great things at the ballpark as kids growing up that  allowed us to fall in love with the game.” “He didn’t really treat me any different, wasn’t harder on me, wasn’t easier on me,” Boone said of his father. “I was an established player at that point, and he treated me with a lot of respect like I was one of his established players. And then away from the field, to have my mom and dad around was cool … I never felt weirdness from my teammates … I never wanted them to feel like they had to hold their tongue around me or anything like that, and I don’t think that was the case.” Six months after writing goodbye letters to his family in case he didn’t survive the procedure, Boone became the first Major Leaguer in history to play after undergoing open heart surgery.  Perhaps Boone’s most remarkable feat came when he was a Houston Astro in 2009. That March, he received open heart surgery to replace an aortic valve. Boone had known of his heart condition since he was at USC, but the effects had recently accelerated.  With the MLB postseason beginning Tuesday, the Trojans have exactly zero former players taking the field on baseball’s biggest stage.  Boone spent half a season with New York. He hit six home runs, drove in 31 runs and posted a modest .254/.302/.418 line through 54 regular season games there.  “To be able to get back to where I got to play in the big leagues again in the month of September — I remember my first game back, how nervous I was just being out in the field again,” Boone said. “But it was really rewarding to get to play with my teammates again for that month of September.” Through all of his career’s twists and turns, Boone hasn’t forgotten the campus that kickstarted it all.  “It was a great way to get my feet under me at the big-league level,” Aaron said of playing third base in the latter half of his rookie season while Bret played across the infield at second. “To have [my] brother over there, it was really cool.” In the last two years of Boone’s college career, USC reached the NCAA Regional Finals, where a win would have put them in the College World Series. The Trojans lost to Texas in 1993 and LSU in 1994, and Boone twice fell a game shy of Omaha.  2009 was Boone’s last season as a player. On Feb. 23, 2010, the 12-year veteran hung up his spikes, headed for ESPN’s Baseball Tonight and shuffled between the studio and the broadcast booth until 2017.  “Everything you experience in the course of your life prepares you and hopefully plays a role in your career,” Boone said. “Playing in huge regional settings at LSU and Texas with everything on the line — I think those are where you gain experience. I certainly think it helped me moving forward in my career.” “I had become a huge ‘SC [football fan] when I was in middle school,” the La Mesa, Calif. native said. “And then my brother happened to go to ‘SC, so it just got me more entrenched with the school and with the program. And then all throughout high school, I always wanted to go to ‘SC. So when that became a reality, it was pretty cool.” Though he denied that college Boone was also a “savage,” it wouldn’t be an unfair word to describe his baseball career. Boone has already etched his name into the history books, and a 28th World Series ring for the Yankees would further cement his legacy as one of baseball’s greats.  The Boone lineage in Cincinnati didn’t stop when Bret was traded to the Atlanta Braves in the winter after the 1998 season. Aaron only had to wait two years for his father Bob to take over as the Reds’ manager.  If there’s anyone in the game who’s up to the task, it’s Aaron Boone — the man who has seen and done it all.last_img read more