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The Elephant Explosion

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first_imgThe title is not intended to suggest pieces of pachyderm flying all over the place, but rather one paleontologist’s theory about the rapid pace of elephant evolution 60 million years ago.  He bases his ideas on a small fossil he found in Morocco.  According to him, the primitive ancestor of all elephants (order Proboscidea) lived 5 million years earlier than thought, and gave rise to “one of the most spectacular examples of morphological evolution known in Mammalia” that occurred in “a rapid and basically explosive placental radiation.”    Emmanuel Gheerbrant, a paleontologist in Paris, described his fossil Eritherium azzouzorum in PNAS.1  His evolutionary story was picked up by Jeanna Bryner at Live Science who wrote about the “oldest elephant relative found.”  Elephant?  Bryner admitted, “the animal would not have looked much like an elephant.  It was just 1.6 to 2 feet (50 to 60 cm) long and weighed 9 to 11 pounds (4 to 5 kg).”  That’s compared to a modern elephant standing 11 feet tall at the shoulder and weighing 5 tons.  New Scientist joined in, saying that “You wouldn’t have recognized Eritherium as an elephant when it was roaming Morocco 60 million years ago… But detailed study of the newly discovered fossil’s teeth, jaws and skull shows it to be the oldest member yet found of the order Proboscidea, of which elephants are the only living survivors.”  New Scientist hoped that “The new find may shed light on the origins of elephants and other mammals… It shows elephants were making evolutionary progress 5 million years after the dinosaurs died out.”    Since pachyderms didn’t evolve till 34 million years ago, Darwin apparently shipped the trunk 26 million years late.  How, then, could Gheerbrant call this an ancestor of the gentle giants we know and live in the local zoo?  Bryner explained, “The animal’s relation to elephants was determined via analysis of the specimen’s teeth and skull.  While it lacked a trunk, the animal had an enlarged first incisor, which researcher Emmanuel Gheerbrant of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, France, says represents a primitive tusk.”  It is doubtful that this little animal used a tooth enlarged by millimeters to pull down trees.    That word “primitive” was indeed found all over Gheerbrant’s paper (used 19 times).  Yet for the animal itself, its features would have seemed well adapted for its own environment.  Is not the word “primitive” a judgment call by the paleontologist assuming it was “making evolutionary progress” from primitive to advanced?  That idea would be guilty of circular reasoning.  Another kind of circularity was revealed in the dating of the fossil.  The estimate of 60 million years was based entirely on index fossils and stratigraphy – both of which assume the evolutionary dating scheme the author was trying to use to establish the fossil’s time and place in evolutionary history.    A look through the scientific paper reveals other statements that cast doubt on the author’s confidence that this fossil has anything to do with the evolution of elephants.  For one thing, the photo of the fossil pieces shows no postcranial anatomy.  His judgment was made entirely on pieces of skull and jaw and five teeth.  None of the teeth looks anything like a primitive tusk – nor did he claim so in the paper, regardless of what he told the press.    For another, placement of this fossil in a phylogenetic position with the Proboscidea involved numerous human judgment calls on his part.  He had to juggle which pieces of evidence, based on tiny measurements from the fragmentary fossil, represent plesiomorphies (traits present before the common ancestor), synapomorphies (traits present in the common ancestor), and homoplasies (unrelated but similar traits attributed to “convergent evolution”).  Of the latter, his table listed 11 homoplasies with other unrelated groups.  The factors he considered worthy were then plugged into computer software that tried to build an evolutionary tree out of them.  The outcome of tree-building software, however, can vary widely depending on the criteria inserted or left out, the relative weighting of factors, the algorithm used, and the outgroup selected (see 07/26/2008, 06/26/2008, 10/15/2003, and especially 10/01/2005 and 07/25/2002).    The following quotes reveal something of the contradictory data, the gaps in empirical data from fossils, and the juggling involved in reaching a conclusion.  Notice how his best fit was obtained with his own previous work – raising additional questions about objectivity:The TNT unweighted parsimony analysis including Eritherium yields a very poorly resolved consensus tree mainly resulting from the unstable position of Khamsaconus.  Analysis without Khamsaconus shows that, besides the robust proboscidean relationships of Eritherium, basal relationships among paenungulates remain unstable, as illustrated by the basal polytomy in the consensus (Fig. 3A).  This polytomy is basically related to our poor fossil knowledge of the ancestral morphotype of several orders such as Embrithopoda, Desmostylia, and Anthracobunia.  Our analysis supports a Sirenia-Desmostylia clade sister group of Proboscidea within Tethytheria.  The standard TNT “implied weighting” analysis yields a topology (Fig. 3B), which is nearly identical to that of Gheerbrant et al.Here’s another quote that reveals multiple levels of subjectivity:2The bunodont incipient lophodont morphotype is derived relative to the eutherian condition, and it is distinct from the perissodactyl pattern.  This morphotype is an additional morphological character and one of the most remarkable dental characters reported for close relationships of paenungulates, macroscelideans, and louisinines.  However, our parsimony analysis does not formally support sister-group relationships of the Macroscelidea plus Louisininae and the Paenungulata by contrast to molecular and recent morphological analyses advocating the Afrotheria clade.  The recovered topology (Fig. 3) shows a sister-group relationship of Laurasian lophodont ungulates such as perissodactyls to paenungulates, instead of the macroscelideans (and louisinines).  Similarly, our analysis does not discriminate clearly Laurasian (e.g., phenacodontids) and African (e.g., Ocepeia) “condylarths” as possible early ungulate representatives of molecular laurasiatherian and afrotherian clades.  Fossils gaps, and especially for African taxa, most probably explain poorly resolved cladistic basal relationships of the Paenungulata in our tree (Fig. 3).  These gaps are illustrated by our poor knowledge of the ancestral morphotype of several key paenungulates orders; for instance, the ancestral relative size of the last molar in paenungulates is challenged by Eritherium (M33 not enlarged).  At lower level in the tree, the morphological and fossil gap is even worse for the phylogenetic analysis of the superordinal clade Afrotheria including Tenrecoidea and Tubulidentata, which are excluded from this study because of the lack of Paleogene data.  In this respect, the cladistic study of Eritherium does not help to test the question of the macroscelidean position within Afrotheria.  However, Eritherium dental morphology argues for a bunodont-lophodont, i.e., ungulatelike, ancestral morphotype for the Paenungulata, Louisininae, and Macroscelidea, within putative Afrotheria.A lot of his evolutionary reasoning, therefore, depends on tiny measurements of tooth shape and systematic gaps in fossil evidence.  The “ancestral morphotype” exists only in the evolutionist’s imagination.    Given these empirical problems, it does not appear even possible to arrive at a definitive evolutionary analysis from the fossil evidence.  This creature could have been called one more well-adapted, extinct mammal, like many other well-adapted, extinct mammals, and left at that.  The story of evolution, however, is what received prominence.  Gheerbrant spoke of a “rapid paenungulate radiation at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) transition” several times.  In fact, it was this story line that excused the lack of evidence: “Rapid paenungulate radiation and fossil gaps may explain poorly resolved interordinal relationships,” he said at one point.  The elephants-to-be must have been evolving so quickly they didn’t have time to leave any fossils.  In fact, this rapid evolution involved more than the Proboscidea: there was a “rapid and basically explosive placental radiation,” he said.  That explosion involved all the post-Cretaceous placental mammals.    So here is another explosion to add to the Cambrian explosion: a “basically explosive placental radiation” that was used to support evolutionary theory, as was the Cambrian explosion, by the lack of evidence for it (see 05/10/2008).1.  Emmanuel Gheerbrant, “Paleocene emergence of elephant relatives and the rapid radiation of African ungulates,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, print June 22, 2009, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0900251106.2.  Note: the reader does not need to understand the jargon to get a sense of the fudging that goes on.  Curious readers can use Dictionary.com for definitions and the Reference.com page on cladistic analysis.Day by day, we expose the unscientific divination practices of the Darwin sooth-slayers.  Don’t be intimidated by the jargon.  You can look it up.  Learn to perceive the methods, omissions, assumptions and philosophy that makes these modern-day shamans pretend to be doing science, when they are really practicing divination to conjure up the Will of Darwin.(Visited 64 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Key empowerment charters

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first_img29 October 2004The development of industry-specific black economic empowerment (BEE) charters in South Africa is an on-going process. However, charters have alread been developed for several sectors key sectors, including mining, the petroleum and martime sectors, tourism and financial services. Mining charter Petroleum and liquid fuels industry charter Maritime charter Tourism charter Financial services charter An empowerment framework for the country’s agricultural industry has also been launched, charters on BEE in the transport, construction and wine industries – as well as the tourism BEE scorecard – are due for completion by the end of 2004, and work has started on charters for the health and cosmetics sectors.Each charter is tailored to suit a particular industry, the charters generally stipulate a target of 25% black ownership over the next 10 years.“When we achieve that goal by 2014, we will have substantial levels of empowerment in the economy of about 25 to 30 percent”, Department of Trade and Industry director-general Lionel October said recently. “That is the critical mass one needs to create a non-racial and de-racialised economy which can grow on a sustainable basis.”Mining charterThe vision behind the country’s mining charter is to achieve a globally competitive mining industry that can benefit all South Africans. It is an important development in a sector historically dominated by white capital and profiting off the cheap labour provided by a disempowered black majority.The stated goal of the charter is to “create an industry that will proudly reflect the promise of a non-racial South Africa”. One of its key objectives is to achieve 26% ownership of mining companies by previously disadvantaged people within the next 10 years.The charter provides a framework to help mining companies comply with the Mineral & Petroleum Resources Development Act, which obliges mining companies to promote black economic empowerment when applying for new mineral rights or converting current rights.A key component of the charter is the mining scorecard, which provides a framework for measuring the BEE process in the sector.The scorecard has three core elements: direct empowerment through ownership and control of enterprises and assets; human resource development and employment equity; and indirect empowerment through preferential procurement and enterprise development. Mining sector charterMining scorecardOverview of main pointsMineral & Petroleum Resources Development Act Financial sector charterThe financial charter has been developed by the sector as a whole, representing banks, insurers, black business, fund managers and brokerage firms.The charter is a voluntary commitment agreed on unanimously by 10 industry associations. Signatories to the charter believe it will be a key driver of sustainable growth, redressing social and economic inequities in the country and broadening the skills and asset base of the whole economy.The charter provides for significant increases in black ownership, management and skills development over the next 10 years. It emphasises the need for procuring services from black businesses in the sector and fostering new and developing BEE firms through joint ventures, skills transferral and infrastructural support.The charter constitutes a policy framework for the future development of the industry, and is expected to underpin sound business practices and maintain the strength and stability of the financial sector as a whole.In September 2004, Finance Minister Trevor Manuel announced the establishment of a 21-member council to review and monitor the implementation of the goals set out in the charter. Financial sector charterFinancial sector scorecardCouncil to monitor finance charter ICT CharterA working group formed by companies in SA’s information and communications technology (ICT) sector has released its final draft of an empowerment charter for the industry – and says the charter will come into force in late 2005.The charter takes into account extensive input from the country’s ICT community, and includes the much-anticipated targets for BEE in the sector. ICT industry finalises BEE charter Agriculture BEE frameworkAgriculture Minister Thoko Didiza launched an empowerment framework for South Africa’s agricultural industry in July 2004.The AgriBEE framework document addresses issues unique to agriculture, including land reform, seeking to deracialise land ownership and control in SA and to develop initiatives to help black South Africans to own, establish, or participate in agricultural enterprises.The framework proposes various targets, including 30% black ownership of agricultural land by 2014, as well as making a further 20% of agricultural land available to black people through leaseholds.“We also propose that an amount of land be made available for use by farm workers in order to address issues of poverty alleviation as well as creating opportunities for small, medium and micro enterprise development within this sector”, the minister said.A steering committee will be set up to consult and share information about the framework, and to present a final report to the government by November 2004. AgriBEE framework for agriculture Transport, construction, wine, tourism, health, cosmeticsThe Department of Trade and Industry says that charters on black economic empowerment in South Africa’s transport, construction, and wine industries are due for completion by the end of 2004, while work has started on charters for other industries, including the health and cosmetics sectors.“We hope to have one overall charter for the health industry, which encompasses the pharmaceutical sector, care providers and retail”, DTI director-general Lionel October said, adding that BEE in the health sector would seek to ensure expanded access to quality health care for both the public and private sectors.In May, Environmental Affairs and Tourism Minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk said his department would finalise its BEE scorecard for SA’s tourism industry by the end of 2004. Charter to improve healthcareCharter for construction industryBEE plan for cosmetics sector SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

South Africa’s over-the-top football fans

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first_img14 May 2010 South African soccer fans are among the most colourful, passionate – and eccentric – in the world, as visitors to the country during the 2010 Fifa World Cup™ will soon discover. Come the afternoon of 11 June, should you find yourself in the grandstand of the Johannesburg’s calabash-shaped Soccer City stadium, chances are you’ll be sitting next to someone sporting a bright yellow jersey, oversized goggles and a decorated miner’s helmet or “makarapa”, and blowing a bright plastic trumpet known as a vuvuzela.Symbols of pride And these are just some of the must-have “symbols of pride” for any self-respecting South African football fan, local soccer fanatic Freddy “Saddam” Maake told BuaNews recently. You might also see supporters eating bread to indicate that the opposition is their “daily bread”, opening a Bible in search of divine intervention, or carrying a homemade coffin to indicate that their team is about to “bury” the opposition. “Come the World Cup, Bafana Bafana supporters will be easily recognised … we are proudly South African and what better way to show it than to have all our symbols,” said Maake, urging South Africans to go all out and buy the full range to show their support for the national team. With the kick-off to Africa’s first Fifa World Cup fast approaching, entrepreneurs’ creative juices are flowing freely, resulting in some hilarious supporter accessories. Vuvuzelas, kuduzelas, momozelas … One company recently launched vuvuzela-shaped earplugs for quieter fans. Company spokesperson Andrew Chin said the move was a patriotic one, intended to embrace the instrument while providing ear protection for those who wanted it. “The World Cup is a fantastic event, and rather than entertaining complaints about the noise from vuvuzelas, we thought we’d do something positive,” Chin told BuaNews. “We believe all South Africans should get with the World Cup party, embrace it and have fun at the same time!” Among other accessories is the Kuduzela trumpet, a kudu horn-shaped alternative to the vuvuzela, which sounds like a trumpeting elephant. Then there’s the “momozela”, or baby vuvuzela, which sounds like a baby crying. While many may find it irritating, local soccer fanatics love the sound it makes. Maake said there is also the “vuthela”, which is more user-friendly as it does not take as much effort to blow. And those with a burst of energy to carry extra kilos to the stadium might want to take the “baleka”, or “gijima” as it is popularly known, which, after being wound for some time, emits a sound like an air-raid siren.Six colours of passion Some local supporters simply cannot do without their long, colourful church robes when they go out to support their team, Maake said, adding that it has become fashionable for fans to wear these along with giant glasses displaying team slogans and logos, and afro wigs sprayed the colours of the national flag. The country’s creative entrepreneurs have also made scarves, head bunnies and hand gloves for those who will attend matches in the chillier parts of the country. And of course, the South African flag is a must for every supporter, its latest incarnation being the car side-mirror “socks” that have become increasingly visible on the country’s roads. The makarapa And then there’s the makarapa, the modified, decorated miners’ helmet unique to South African soccer fans. The makarapa dates back to 1979, according to the man credited with making the first one. “The way I invented the makarapa is almost as weird as I am,” said Alfred Baloyi, 54, a die-hard Kaizer Chiefs supporter who said the idea came to him while he was sitting in a stadium. “Someone threw a bottle and hit someone on the head.” At his next game Baloyi, who worked as a cleaner in Limpopo province at the time, wore his work safety helmet decorated with football imagery. The makarapa’s embellishments commonly include images of favourite players, former president Nelson Mandela, current politicians, and team flags and colours, said Baloyi, whose selling price has escalated from a mere R7 in 1979 to a cool R300 for a helmet today. For the World Cup, Baloyi and his employees are making makarapas to suit fans of most of the 32 teams. Maake, who has over 300 makarapas, boasts that he has one for every occasion. He said his makarapas have mini-portraits of Nelson Madela, Danny Jordaan, Sepp Blatter, Kaizer Motaung, Irvin Khoza and Molefi Oliphant. “I wear these guys with pride,” Maake said. “They contributed significantly in bringing us the Fifa World Cup.” Whether Bafana Bafana win or lose during the tournament, Mzansi’s fans will be sure to win a million hearts with their outrageous regalia and over-the-top antics. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Watch for soybean diseases after big rains

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I looked at the soybean prices on Sunday – all were still less than $10/Bushel.  This price combined with yield losses due to late planting, extra expenses for additional late weed control, and flood injury really put the kibosh on all but the most guaranteed return on investment for the remainder of 2015.  Here are a few guidelines, results from our studies in Ohio that point to the best return on investment.Foliar pathogens have the most impact on soybeans at the later growth stages (R3 to R6) by reducing the photosynthetic area of the leaves that contribute to pod development and seed growth (http://www.oardc.osu.edu/soyrust/2007edition/10-SoybeanGrowthandDevelopment.pdf).  Soybeans also have an uncanny ability to compensate for missing neighbors.  The profitability measure for the 2015 season will be to scout for the occurrence of diseases after flowering R3 and choose the best fungicide if necessary.Septoria brown spot.  This is a lower canopy disease, which surprisingly, we have not been getting too many reports of this year.  Where we are, it is from fields that are planted into continuous soybean and have heavy residue.  Even in these situations, the yield loss for this is still on average 2 to 3 bu/A.Frogeye leaf spot.  This disease we are monitoring, not only because there are a few highly susceptible varieties but also because there are reports from Illinois, Indiana, and up and down the Mississippi of populations that are no longer managed by the strobilurin class of fungicides.  If you see it, please send this to the lab ASAP, so we can run some tests.  We have seen yield differences with low levels of disease (5 to 12% leaf area affected) of 5 to 10 bu/Acre.  This is the one to keep an eye out for but the timing for sprays is between R3 and early R4.Sclerotinia stem rot or white mold.  For those fields with a long history of this disease, this can cause problems when we have cool nights (a.k.a no air conditioning turned on in your house) and heavy dews.  We have started our scouting for this pathogen as fields begin to get closer to flowering.  However, for those historic areas where white mold is always present AND a susceptible to moderately susceptible variety was planted, a fungicide may be necessary this year.  The key is the timing, and coverage of the fungicide in the field.  The target area is the lower part of the stem.Approach – we have measured significant reductions in white mold when we applied this fungicide at Western branch right before flowering followed by a second application 10 days later.Endura – we have measured significant reductions in white mold with this fungicide with one application timing (R1 – a few plants are beginning to flower in the field).Phoenix and Cadet Herbicides – both have reduced the incidence of white mold in trials in northeast Ohio.  If you are also going after weed escapes, this may also be a tool to consider.Topsin M – this has been the stand by white mold fungicide, but for the past 3 years, we have not been able to measure reductions in disease.Some cautions, we have not been able to reduce white mold with a fungicide nor with a herbicide if the field is planted to a highly susceptible variety and the crop is in full flower and infections have already occurred.  These materials mainly work as protectants and have to be on the plant at those lower nodes to protect it prior to the arrival of the pathogen.In summary, for foliar pathogens there is time to let the plants recover and take a look later in the growing season to determine if the pathogens are present.  This is the year to focus those scouting efforts on highly susceptible varieties.  For historic white mold areas, this will be another year to implement measures on those highly to moderately susceptible varieties.last_img read more

Cathedral Cavern Cache — Geocache of the Week

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first_imgTraditional GC2CQB7 by Hattlebags Image by Slažinskas. Location: North West England, United Kingdom N 54° 25.006 W 003° 03.519′ Even the most focused geocachers need at least a few minutes to process this humbling sight before they can search for the cache. But beware: this hide comes with added difficulty as there is no GPS signal in this cave; luckily, this geocache also comes with a useful hint. Image by Delta68. After parking and taking a quick but very scenic stroll to the quarry,  you’ll find yourself at the cave entrance. Here, there’s a short tunnel, hewn centuries ago into the monochrome stone, which leads you to the main attraction of the old slate mine: The Cathedral. Image by TmGrandemotte. Upon entering The Cathedral, visitors are stunned by the sight of an enormous slate pillar that prevents the domed ceiling from collapsing. A gigantic skylight on one end of the 40 ft (12 m) tall cave floods the cavern with angelic light, creating an atmosphere full of grandeur and the perfect backdrop for breathtaking pictures. Image by oktanol. In the Lake District of North West England lies the valley of Little Langdale which, for the past several hundred years, was mined and quarried extensively for copper and slate. One of the disused inter-linked tunnel systems, Cathedral Quarries, is now open to the public and makes for a magical cache outing.center_img Finding a geocache after a long search can feel like there’s a “light at the end of the tunnel.” This saying becomes quite literal when it comes to this week’s Geocache of the Week — Cathedral Cavern Cache, GC2CQB7. While flashlights are not necessary to explore this area of the larger quarry system, you may want to bring your wellies: frequent rainfalls in the Lake District can lead to light flooding and subsequently wet feet if you choose to leave your waterproof footwear at home.  Difficulty: 2 Terrain: 3 Image by allieballie. Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world. Once the logbook is signed and the cache container is put back where it was found, there are even more secrets hidden within this magical place. Amateur speleologists can venture on to discover the second level of the main chamber, fish lovers might catch a glimpse of the shy goldfish that are said to live in the cave’s floodwater pool, and aspiring opera singers should definitely make use of the legendary acoustics within the cavern. Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form. Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedUnderground — Geocache of the WeekFebruary 7, 2018In “Community”Down, down, down into the underground – Below Above, The Fallen Monarch (GC2GAMT) – Geocache of the WeekApril 3, 2013In “Community”It’s the Spookiest Time of Year — Manunka Chunk Tunnels (GC82B5) — Geocache of the WeekOctober 23, 2013In “Community”last_img read more

Why Topic Pages Haven’t Worked For News Websites Yet

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first_imgRelated Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Yesterday we outlined why topic pages are becoming increasingly popular on the Web, as a way to organize social or news content. As daily consumers of such content, we’re used to the chronological (and often real-time) ordering of updates from Facebook, Twitter, blogs and more. But the latest wave of Web publishing services, like Pinterest and Medium, are exploring ways to present content topically or thematically. This isn’t a new concept; in fact news organizations have experimented with topic pages too. However, the results from news sites so far have been mixed.The New York Times has a topic pages hub called Times Topics. Each topic page in the hub “collects all the news, reference and archival information, photos, graphics, audio and video files” dating back to 1981 on a particular topic, into a single page. Not only do readers of a topic page have access to all present and past news about a topic, they can subscribe to future news about it via RSS.Topics range from subjects (like “Net Neutrality”), to people (the current lead topic page is about foot-in-mouth congressman Todd Akin), to places (such as Iraq). Tags:#New Media#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img richard macmanus Looking at the Todd Akin page shows us some of the benefits of topic pages:1. Context: The main article not only explains why Akin is in the news currently (a stunningly stupid comment about rape), but outlines his personal history as a congressman and the things he has done and advocated for.2. History: Each page has a list of links to previous NYT stories about the topic; in this case any past story that mentioned Todd Akin.3. Curated: The New York Times has a reputation for quality journalism, so many readers will trust the Times to curate an ongoing topic page on Todd Akin. Even if, as appears to be the case for NYT, the topic pages are largely automated.4. Multimedia: This isn’t evident on Akin’s page, but some topic pages – such as the one for President Barack Obama – have video, interactive charts and other multimedia content. This is great content that may not be appropriate for news articles, but finds a suitable home on a topic page.So Why Aren’t Topic Pages Getting Traction For News Sites?Times Topic is an admirable effort from The New York Times. The problem for them – and any other news organization – is that topic pages aren’t showing up in search engines. A search for “Todd Akin” in Google does not surface the NYT topic page about him. A NYT news article was the fourth link on page one, but we scrolled through the next nine pages of Google search results and didn’t see the NYT topic page. Even the colorful NYT topic page for President Obama is nowhere to be seen in Google – and heck, the President’s MySpace page is in the first few pages of results!Why isn’t Google picking up NYT’s topic pages? Most probably because blogs and other news sites simply don’t link to them. You can’t blame them, because NYT itself don’t appear to link to its topic pages: the top NYT news article about Akin fails to include a link to the relevant topic page.Another clue that topic pages for news organizations aren’t quite ready for prime time is that the BBC has ceased doing them. Four years ago, the BBC announced a Topic Pages Beta. The idea was the same as NYT, to aggregate content about a single topic onto one page. But sadly, this was one Web 2.0 beta that didn’t make it to a full launch. Not getting high placement in search results is probably one reason why topic pages haven’t quite worked for NYT and BBC. But it’s also due to the real-time reading habits of people in this era of the Web. In an age dominated by chronological flows of information – such as from Facebook, Twitter and blogs – topical organization of news and social content has taken a back seat to the real-time firehose.That’s where the latest publishing platforms, like Medium and Pinterest, could make an impact. What both Pinterest and Medium are are trying to do is layer topic pages on top of user-generated, social content. We don’t know yet whether this will work, but if it does then consumers may start to get used to topic pages. That in turn will prompt NYT, BBC, news blogs and other professional media to take another look at topic pages. We’ll also begin to see Facebook, Twitter and other social networks experiment with topical organization of content too. Watch this space! 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

New-look Alab Pilipinas win 5th straight, rout Slingers

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first_imgTrending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:18Sangley airport to be operational in 7 days – Tugade01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City FILE PHOTO – Justin Brownlee of Alab Pilipinas shoots a jumper over Chris Charles of the Singapore Slingers in their game in the Asean Basketball League at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netNew-look San Miguel Alab Pilipinas remained the same force of nature on the road, silencing Singapore Slingers, 82-69, for their fifth straight victory in the 2018 ASEAN Basketball League Sunday at OCBC Arena in Singapore.Renaldo Balkman scored seven of Alab’s last 10 points to finish with a team-best 21 points on top of six rebounds, four assists, and three steals, while Josh Urbiztondo once again went ablaze from downtown, hitting five treys to wind up with 17 markers to go along with eight boards.ADVERTISEMENT Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH MOST READ LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Xavier Alexander led the Slingers with a game-high 32 points and seven rebounds, but failed to get ample support with Chris Charles posting 14 markers and seven boards in a foul-plagued outing.Liew had seven points to lead the Singapore locals.The scores:SAN MIGUEL ALAB PILIPINAS 82 — Balkman 21, Urbiztondo 17, Brownlee 16, Parks 16, Maierhofer 6, Domingo 4, Raymundo 2, Alabanza 0, Hontiveros 0, Sumalinog 0.SINGAPORE SLINGERS 69 — Alexander 32, Charles 14, Liew 7, Goh 6, Mandani 6, Low 4, Folkoff 0, Ng 0.ADVERTISEMENT UP clips UE in 5 sets in UAAP debut of Kenyan coach Justin Brownlee tallied a double-double with 16 points and 10 rebounds, while Bobby Ray Parks collected 16 markers, four assists and two steals, and an emphatic block on Larry Liew in the final minute to punctuate the victory.Alab used an 8-0 surge to open the third quarter to take control of the game, 45-38, and go on cruise control from that point.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Philippine side rose to 8-4, a game behind third-seed Mono Vampire (9-4), while the Slingers fell to an even 7-7 slate.Alab evened its season series against Singapore with each taking wins on the road. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Read Next Quarters: 17-20, 37-38, 66-54, 82-69. NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC AFP official booed out of forum John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding View commentslast_img read more