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Scrapping grants will leave some disabled people housebound – O’Fearraigh

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first_img Pinterest Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Pinterest Google+ Glenties area Cllr John Sheamais O Fearraigh has hit out at the government for its decision to axe the transportation allowance for people with a disability.The Gweedore based representative was speaking after he received clarification that, not only has the transportation adaptation grant ending, but now the transportation allowance for people with disability is to be discontinued as well.Cllr O’Fearraigh says this is particularly discriminatory towards people with a disability in rural areas, and losing these two grants will effectively render many people housebound………Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/jsofgrants.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Twitter By News Highland – October 20, 2014 Facebook Homepage BannerNews WhatsApp Google+center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Previous articleMan due in court on Derry rape chargeNext articleMore building projects getting off the ground in Donegal News Highland GAA decision not sitting well with Donegal – Mick McGrath Nine Til Noon Show – Listen back to Wednesday’s Programme Scrapping grants will leave some disabled people housebound – O’Fearraigh Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector publishedlast_img read more

After loss to Huskies, Orange focuses on speeding up tempo

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first_imgSporting a somewhat bulkier version of Rip Hamilton’s trademark face mask to cover her newly fractured nose at practice on Tuesday, sophomore Skylar Sabbag could definitely vouch for the speed of the game this past weekend. ‘There was, like, 10 seconds left,’ Sabbag said. ‘Connecticut was taking a corner kick, and I was marking my player. The ball came to us, and I was trying to head it out. So she (the Connecticut player) was on my left, Alyscha (Mottershead) was on my right, and then we all went up, and I don’t remember what happened after that.’ What happened after that, among other things, was the final horn to a match in which the Orange held very little control over the pacing. In turn, SU was shut down. And pacing, thus far, has fluctuated with the success and tribulations of the Orange. It appears it will continue that way. A couple weeks ago, when facing highly ranked schools like Portland and Washington, Syracuse was trying to slow the game down. This week in practice, preparing for division foes in Notre Dame and DePaul, SU will need to find a way to speed it back up. Between then and now, Syracuse has gotten more comfortable as a team and, as a result, has been able to control possession a little easier against lesser opponents. But Sunday’s game served, at the very least, as a wake-up call that these Big East teams can run, too.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text The focus of the next few practices will be on speed of decision making and technical execution under pressure as the Orange prepares for quicker, more decisive teams on the horizon. ‘We get the ball, and we take one or two touches,’ SU head coach Phil Wheddon said. ‘When against these fast teams, you can’t do that. You’ve got to move the ball much, much quicker. Receive it and play it. We’re going to put some players under some pressure today, to perform individually in a one-on-one situation, and it’s going to be about competing on both sides of the ball.’ Wheddon needs to see how his players will react in the midst of constant pressure, often when it is difficult to communicate between teammates about who guards whom or who needs to be positioned where. These are all decisions the head coach wants to see his team make on the fly. ‘We’re really trying to make sure that players are aware on both attack and defense what their responsibilities are,’ Wheddon said. If the Orange is going to be able to run with the Irish, a team known for being both quick and technical, it is going to have to work on staying alert on both sides of the ball. Connecticut was able to force frequent turnovers because it chased and pressured the Syracuse defense. Casey Ramirez, one of SU’s defensive leaders, recognizes the effect of natural foot speed in every situation. ‘Always being on your toes,’ Ramirez said. ‘If someone gets past you, you always have to recover or watch the ball to make sure that they have to step past someone. If we get better at it, it makes you a better team in general. The faster you play, the better you are.’ Good defense breeds a good offense. Wheddon will be looking to put together some quick-shifting packages to outthink and outrun future conference opponents, because Syracuse can no longer afford to be outhustled. Ramirez is one of the quicker players on the team, but it will rest on the entire squad to pick up the pace. Sabbag has confidence SU will be up for the challenge. ‘I think we’re a fast team,’ she said. ‘I think we just need to play smart. We just need to stay with our players and really do whatever we can to not let them score.’ Last weekend, Sabbag suffered a similar injury to the Detroit Pistons’ Richard Hamilton. An injury Hamilton repeatedly attempted to overcome without the mask. But then he gave in, and he won a championship. Sabbag will now be looking for similar results from herself and the rest of the SU team. And the Orange hopes it will get off to the races. Said Sabbag: ‘Yeah, I’ll be alright. I can play with a broken nose.’ [email protected] Published on September 28, 2010 at 12:00 pm Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more

49ers mailbag: ‘What’s expected after Garoppolo’s stellar season?’

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first_img(CLICK HERE, if you are unable to view this photo gallery on your mobile device.)SANTA CLARA — Training camp is off to an encouraging start for the 49ers with no major injuries, no contract squabbles and no sign that Jimmy Garoppolo will ever lose a game in his blissful career. No practice on Monday means it’s time to answer fans’ pressing questions:How does Fred Warner look at camp? Haven’t heard much about him yet.— Uncle Salty (@MBA_SF) July 30, 2018 Warner is impressive, …last_img read more

Furry heroes to sniff out TB in Mozambique

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first_imgThe furry heroes have helped to clear vast areas of land in Mozambique and Thailand, which can now be used for development. Apopo founder Bart Weetjens used his childhood experiences with pet rats as the foundation for his inspired idea. Rats can survey a mine-infested area quicker than humans, and with virtually no risk of setting off a mine.(Images: Apopo)MEDIA CONTACTS • Bina EmanvelApopo communications manager+255 23 2600 635Janine ErasmusAlready a hero in Southern Africa for its ability to sniff out landmines, the African giant pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus) is once more turning out to be a lifesaver by accurately detecting the presence of tuberculosis bacteria in human sputum samples.Both initiatives are run by the Belgian NGO Anti-Persoonsmijnen Ontmijnende Product Ontwikkeling (Apopo), whose founder Bart Weetjens came up with the idea of training the rats while he was an engineering student.Weetjens developed the methodology after conducting a study of the landmine situation in sub-Saharan Africa. He realised that conventional methods of landmine detection and disarming were dangerous, time-consuming and expensive, and was inspired to use the rodents by his own childhood pet experiences, as well as an article on gerbils as explosives hunters which he read while conducting his landmine survey.Named for their large cheek pouches, the remarkable rodents are renowned for their acute sense of smell and their intelligence and willingness to be trained. At under 2kg on average, the rats are too light to trigger an explosion, making them the ideal weapon in the war against landmines.Apopo runs mine clearing programmes in Mozambique and Thailand, and in 2012 started preparing for operations in Angola, another heavily mined country, where it hopes to eventually deploy as many as 80 rats.Its headquarters are in Morogoro, Tanzania, where training takes place in what the organisation calls “near-real conditions” – the only difference is that the landmines in the training fields are already disarmed.Using the rats’ sensitive noses for humanitarian purposes has paid off handsomely. Apopo says that the Mozambican team, including 47 accredited rats, has made about 4.3-million square metres of land usable again in the southern Gaza province, which it has now cleared. Over 1 860 landmines, 776 dangerous unexploded ordnance, and 12 817 small arms and items of ammunition were dealt with in 2011 alone.In its 2011 annual report, the organisation revealed that it will start mine-clearing operations in the neighbouring Manica province, on the Zimbabwe border, during 2012.According to the Halo Trust, an organisation that specialises in clearing away the remains of warfare, the northern half of Mozambique is now clear of mines – in total, 100 843 devices were removed from 552 minefields. In the south, however, there are still an estimated 520 minefields that are yet to be cleared in the Maputo, Manica and Tete provinces. Many mines lie in land that is earmarked for development, but can’t be used because of the buried threat.But thanks to the rats, the job has become easier in recent years. Two rats, each with a human handler, can survey 300 square metres of land in one hour. Two trained people using metal detectors will take about two days to cover the same area, says Apopo.Land that is safe to work on has important implications for the Mozambican people, many of whom have been maimed by landmines. Now that they can plough their lands without fear they can at least feed their families and even earn an income.All rats are trained to the requirements of the International Mine Action Standards organisation, and training takes about nine months, using positive reinforcement and food rewards. The animals have to pass a test once their performance has noticeably reached a plateau, and if they pass – which most do on the first attempt – they are officially licenced as a mine detection animal.Sniffing out TB, saving livesThe intelligent little creatures have now turned their talents to another life-saving task – sniffing out pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a disease that is second only to HIV/Aids as a single-organism killer, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).Apopo says that the highly trained rats can analyse 40 sputum samples in seven minutes, a task that would take an entire day by a technician using a microscope. This equates to about 1 680 samples in a day’s work.This technology was developed by Apopo in partnership with the Tanzanian National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Program and the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, among others. It complies with the WHO TB diagnostic group’s seven top priorities required for a recognised diagnostic method.The rats work in special automated cages which hold samples below a series of sniffer holes. The cage can register their response and activate a click and food reward, while sending data directly to a database. The method has boosted the detection of new cases by an astonishing 40%, says the organisation.Rats use their sense of smell to swiftly sniff out the volatile organic compounds released by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in positive samples, scratching at those which are TB-positive. If an unknown sample is targeted by at least two rats, this is quickly confirmed with microscopy.These samples are reported to the hospitals, who follow up with a positive diagnosis, treatment and counselling of patients.The rats discover between five and 15 new patients every week, says Apopo. In its 2011 annual report it supplies figures of almost 98 000 sputum samples analysed since 2008, with 45 000 second-line screenings, out of which 7 700 positives were found by Direct Observation of Treatment, Short-course or Dots clinics, and an additional 2 300 cases – which were missed by the Dots method of screening – were found by rats.In 2011 the organisation received approval for a grant from the Flemish government that would allow it to start working in Mozambique.Apopo hopes to increase the rate of detection of new cases in this country, as it too is struggling with a high TB burden. Operations are expected to start in Maputo in December. Killer on the looseAlthough TB is both preventable and curable, almost 9-million new patients contracted the disease in 2010 worldwide, says the WHO, on top of the millions who are already chronically ill.Nearly 1.5-million succumbed – of these deaths, over 95% occurred in low- and middle-income countries, and the burden in East Africa is high compared to other regions.The disease is named as one of the top three causes of death among women aged 15 to 44, and about 10-million children were orphaned in 2010 as a result of their parents dying of TB.In Southern Africa, there is the growing incidence of multidrug-resistant TB and its successor, extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB), which arose out of the mismanagement of patients infected with the former strain. The XDR-TB form was first publicised in South Africa, following an outbreak in 2006 which killed all but one of the patients.The WHO estimates that one in three people on the planet carry the M. tuberculosis organism, although not all are ill and therefore can’t transmit the disease. All age groups are at risk, but those whose immune systems are already weakened, whether by lifestyle choices such as smoking or by another disease such as Aids or diabetes, are at greater risk of falling ill.last_img read more

Square Kilometre Array book published

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first_imgThe Square Kilometre Array (SKA) global radio telescope project – which includes a first phase site in South Africa – published a book this month on the project’s progress. It features photos and analysis from some of the best science, astronomy and engineering minds in the world. The first phase of the SKA radio telescope project, called MeerKAT, is being installed in the Karoo desert. It will eventually form part of the first phase of the SKA programme. By September 2015, seven of the 64 dish installations have been constructed and tested. The global SKA project is scheduled to be completed by 2024. (Image: SKA MeerKAT)• SKA: answering the big questions about the universe • SKA will boost Africa’s presence in science fields• SKA will drive growth of Africa’s human capital• Africa to co-host Square Kilometre Array A new, updated two-volume book on the history and the science of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) international radio telescope project was published in September 2015. South Africa is very much at the forefront of the SKA project; the MeerKAT telescope system, currently being constructed and tested in the Karoo desert, forms part of the first phase of the global SKA venture.The chapters in this new book reflect both the science undertaken with the SKA, including ground-breaking research in cosmology and the study of dark matter and dark energy, as well as the global efforts by engineers and the science community to co-ordinate and construct such a massive international project.Once completed, hopefully by 2024, SKA will interconnect a series of radio telescope systems in 10 countries in order to search space for a better understanding about the universe and solve some of the secrets of fundamental physics.  What is SKA? SKA is one of the largest global science projects ever undertaken, featuring a multinational representation of scientists, engineers and astronomers. The positioning of the African continent and the accommodating climate make South Africa a vital component of the project’s success. (Image: SKA/MeerKAT)The Square Kilometre Array project is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope, led by SKA Organisation. The SKA will conduct transformational science to improve understanding of the universe and the laws of fundamental physics, monitoring the sky in unprecedented detail and mapping it hundreds of times faster than any current facility.The SKA is not a single telescope; rather, it is a collection of telescopes or instruments, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA is to be constructed in two phases: Phase 1 (called SKA1) in South Africa and Australia; Phase 2 (called SKA2) expanding into other African countries, with the component in Australia also being expanded.With support from Australia, Canada, China, India, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Sweden, The Netherlands and the UK, the SKA project has on board some of the world’s best scientists, engineers and policy makers. And over 100 companies and research institutions across 20 countries are involved in the design and development of the telescope.SKA: the book With 135 chapters, 1 200 contributors and 2 000 pages on the science behind the SKA project, its official companion book is titled Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array. It is available to download free from the SKA website. (Image: SKA/MeerKAT) The book, titled Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array, consists of 2 000 pages in more than a hundred chapters, with contributions from more than 1 000 experts, scientists and members of the SKA organisation on astrophysics, cosmology and the search for answers in the universe, all within the context of radio telescope technology. Accompanied by a variety of photos and infographics covering the science and construction of the SKA system, the book is the authoritative guide on how this global initiative will work. It tracks the progress made on the project since 2004, highlighting the work being done in Australia, South Africa and other African countries including Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia and Zambia.“The publication of the new SKA science book is the culmination of more than a year’s work by the SKA science team and the scientific community at large,” says Dr Robert Braun, the SKA science director in a release publicising the book. “It’s also a great testimony to the growing interest and scope of the SKA.”According to the publishers, the book deals with SKA’s search for life in the universe through the study of molecules in forming planetary systems and the search for potential radio signals from intelligent civilisations. The search for answers from “the cosmic dawn” – the first billion years of the universe’s existence – will not only inform the past, but also give the world a look at what might happen to the cosmos in the future.SKA and the NDP Construction of the South African SKA radio telescope project infrastructure, called MeerKAT, in the Karoo desert in March 2014. By September 2015, seven of the 64 dish installations have been constructed and tested. The global SKA project is set to be completed by 2024. (Image: SKA MeerKAT) The SKA project in South Africa fulfils the requisites for some vital pillars of the National Development Plan Vision 2030, including skills development through increased job opportunities and training during the construction of the MeerKAT facility, using local labour and top South Africa engineering and science talent.The project also addresses other NDP pillars such as creating efficient, world-class infrastructure networks and developing rural communities.  Construction of the South African SKA radio telescope project infrastructure, called MeerKAT, in the Karoo desert during March 2014. By September 2015, seven of the 64 dish installations have been constructed and tested. The global SKA project is set to be completed by 2024. (Image: SKA MeerKAT) A MeerKAT in the Karoo The first phase of the SKA radio telescope project, called MeerKAT, is currently being installed in the Karoo desert and will eventually form part of the first phase of the SKA programme. By September 2015, seven of the 64 dish installations have been constructed and tested. The global SKA project is set to be completed by 2024.  Infographic: SKA MeerKAT Further reading: Everything you need to know about the SKA project, including MeerKAT and the new booklast_img read more

Plenty of smiling soybean farmers in Northwest Ohio

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest After a dismal 2015 for Northwest Ohio and a rocky start to 2016, the current harvest is showing much better results than a year ago. Many farmers are seeing their soybean yield monitors hit numbers never seen before. DuPont Pioneer Account Manager Chasitie Euler gives all of the details in the week’s DuPont Pioneer Field Report with Ty Higgins.last_img

Lao athletes hope for medals, look for luck at SEA Games

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first_imgRobredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo View comments MOST READ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sithixay said strong athletic teams from Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia were ready to compete in more than 40 track and field events at the 29th games. The best hopes are female runners, Manivanh Chanthavong and Lodkeo Inthakoumman, both are certainties for the team given their past international experience. Lodkeo is currently a professional runner of Laos and she succeeded in the women’s 21km running event at Vientiane International Half Marathon in March. At the 17th Asean University Games in Indonesia in 2014, Lodkeo won a gold medal in the women’s 10,000 metres event, a silver medal in the women’s 5000 metres event and a bronze medal in the women’s 1500 metres event.Manivanh will no doubt compete in the women’s 100 metres hurdles along with shot-put, discus, javelin, long jump, 200 metres and high jump events at the 29th SEA Games, while Lodkeo’s favoured events are the women’s 1,500, 5,000 and 10,000 metre events.At the 18th Asean University Games in Singapore last July the National University of Laos athletics team won two gold medals in the men’s 110 metre hurdles and women’s 800 metres.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters At the 27th SEA Games in Myanmar in 2013 the Lao team won two bronze medals while at the 25th SEA Games in Vientiane back in 2009, the team won only a solitary bronze medal on home soil.Next year, the Lao Amateur Athletics Federation will support the staging of track and field events at the 11th National Games to be hosted by Xieng Khuang province.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side SEA Games: Malaysia promises to iron out ‘glitches’ LATEST STORIES Photo from Vientiane Times/ANNVIENTIANE – The Lao athletic team are hoping to bring home medals from the track and field events at the 29th SEA Games hosted by Malaysia from August 19 to 31.The Lao athletic team is comprised of eight men and four women, all ready to compete in 18 track and field events at the 29th games. ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ The Lao athletic team will travel to Malaysia on Thursday and they will prepare to compete in the track and field events from August 20 to 31.There are 47 track and field events at the 29th games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingLao Amateur Athletics Federation Secretary General Sithixay Sackpraseuth said this year the Lao athletes were more skilled and developed and they were fit enough for 18 track and field events.At the 28th SEA Games in Singapore in 2015, the Lao athletic team competed in 16 track and field events.last_img read more