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GD gets contract to maintain five US aircraft carriers

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first_img The U.S. Navy has awarded General Dynamics NASSCO–Norfolk a maintenance contract to perform non-nuclear planning and maintenance work during six chief of naval operations (CNO) availabilities on four Nimitz-class aircraft carriers and one Gerald R. Ford-class carrier, home-ported in or visiting Norfolk, Virginia.An availability is the time a U.S. Naval ship undergoes repairs and alterations to return it to a fully operational status and ensure complete mission readiness. Upon completion, all work within an availability must be documented and certified.The five-year cost-plus-award-fee and incentive fee contract the company received also includes the ability to provide for any continuing or emergent maintenance repairs on any of these East Coast aircraft carriers.In addition, NASSCO–Norfolk was awarded a $23 million cost-plus-award-fee modification for the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) fiscal 2016 planned incremental availability, as part of an add-on to a previously awarded contract. Under this contract, the company will provide ship-repair services such as the planning and execution of depot-level maintenance, alterations and modifications that will update and improve the ship’s military and technical capabilities.Work will be performed at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia, and is expected to be completed by May 2017.Another contract for work on aircraft carriers was awarded to Huntington Ingalls’ Newport News Shipbuilding division which received $20 million for the refueling complex overhaul of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).NNS is to carry out the overhaul, modernization, repair, maintenance, and refueling, all expected to be completed by November 2016. View post tag: Gerald R. Ford-class View post tag: HII Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today General Dynamics gets contract to maintain five US aircraft carriers General Dynamics gets contract to maintain five US aircraft carriers View post tag: US Navy August 3, 2016 View post tag: Nimitz-Class View post tag: GD Share this articlelast_img read more

Conversations at #ShiftForum: Protecting Human Capital in the Digital Age

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first_imgWe’ve all heard the dystopian predictions of doom in which robots will take over the world and leave us humans with nothing to do. I don’t subscribe to that extreme view. In fact, recent research reveals that business leaders are divided about the impact machines will have on our day-to-day work in the near future, but they all agreed on one thing: balancing technology with a human touch will be vital to success.So who is looking out for the interests of humans? How do we ensure that people have the relevant skills to thrive in the jobs of tomorrow? What role should government take in shaping future workforce development and technology policy? I hosted a roundtable exploring this topic at NewCo’s Shift Forum, held recently in San Francisco, and the conversation was fascinating.Liz Matthews, senior vice president of Global Brand and Creative at Dell, on stage at NewCo’s Shift Forum 2018 where she discussed the future of work.With emerging technologies like augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR), artificial intelligence/machine learning (AI), big data, cloud computing and the Internet of Things (IoT) poised to completely transform the workplace by 2030, our small group agreed that government must help create a level playing field and that it has a role in ensuring basic security and privacy protections. But beyond that, no one saw government as being nimble or visionary enough to actively manage tech advancement in a way that was beneficial to the workforce.Skills for the #FutureofWorkAs technology disrupts entire industries, it’s inevitable that some jobs will be lost while new ones will be created. And it’s not just occurring in blue-collar professions; some will argue that AI is already taking over a number of white-collar jobs by automating certain tasks in sectors like accounting or the law.The most likely area for government to intervene is in the area of workforce development, specifically by shaping soft skills development in a way that maps to technology advancements. To do so, our roundtable participants noted, government must:Drive skills development from the state and local level to ensure a talent pipeline for jobs in a particular region.Focus on soft skills – critical thinking, for example – knowing that they should be applicable for those currently in the workforce regardless of how technology shifts in the future.Realize not everyone, particularly those likely to be displaced in the next 10-15 years, wants to be coders.Work with companies to build education curriculum targeted to available jobs.In the long-term, universal basic income (a much-discussed topic at several Shift Forum sessions) in some form will be part of the conversation. Our group explored ways to balance this safety net concept with the dignity of work. For example, could an alternative be using an individual’s personal data as a commodity against which they would be paid?The real trick, everyone agreed, will be for government to intervene appropriately and drive productivity while not stifling innovation.Business Must LeadOrganizations, too, have a role to play. As jobs are phased out or upleveled, what is a company’s obligation to its employees? Certainly on-the-job training and skills development. But it will be just as important, if not more so, for companies to create internal cultures that encourage exploration and knowledge-sharing across generations. Reaching out proactively to local governments or partnering with unions are other ways the business community can start preparing for the workforce changes to come, our group concluded.What are your views on the role of government and business in preparing for the massive societal and economic shifts on the horizon? I look forward to hearing your thoughts!last_img read more

IPL: Jofra Archer named Most Valuable Player after starring for Rajasthan Royals | Cricket News

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first_imgEngland fast bowler Jofra Archer won the Most Valuable Player award after starring for Rajasthan Royals at the 2020 Indian Premier League; South African quick Kagiso Rabada was leading wicket-taker and KL Rahul was top run-scorer Last Updated: 10/11/20 7:39pm Jofra Archer was won the IPL's Most Valuable Player award for 2020 after taking 20 wickets for Rajasthan Royals
Jofra Archer was won the IPL's Most Valuable Player award for 2020 after taking 20 wickets for Rajasthan Royals

Next up, the Beaver Valley Nitehawks

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first_imgWhile the Beaver Valley Nitehawks have cruised along this Kootenay International Junior Hockey League season over nice smooth newly laid pavement, the Nelson Leafs have hit almost every pothole along the way to a third-place finish in the Murdoch Division.However, despite the Hawks finishing with 17 more wins and 33 points better in the Murdoch standing than the Leafs, both teams enter Tuesday opening game of the best-of-seven series on even terms.That’s right, when the starting pistol goes off at 7 p.m. in the Fruitvale Arena it’s open season on which team will advance to the Kootenay Conference Championship.“We’ve had tight games with them all year but I believe we need to adopt the same game plan as we did against Castlegar . . . continue our physicality, our defense-first hockey and then capitalize on our chances,” said Leaf veteran forward Dale Howell after Nelson posted the 4-2 series upset of the Castlegar Rebels — a team that also finished well ahead of the Green and White during the regular season.Most experts have the Nitehawks waltzing through this series just like the KIJHL regular season champs disposed of the Grand Forks Border Bruins in the first round of the playoffs — in straight games.However, those same experts probably also penciled in a Beaver Valley-Castlegar Murdoch Final in their KIJHL pool.“I think we have play with composure,” said Leaf head coach Mario DiBella when asked about the Nitehawks.“We have to get pucks to the net and we need to have traffic in front of their goaltender.”Nelson managed to take two games from the Hawks this season — one of the games coming in overtime.However, a quirk in the schedule saw the teams play only twice since Christmas with both games decided by a single goal and the Leafs struggling to put a complete roster together. “We went through some key injuries earlier in the season but it seemed like everything kind of lined up as the season ended with everyone getting healthy and back into the lineup,” said Howell, leading a balanced Leafs scoring attack with six points.“That’s been a big difference for us having a full lineup with everyone able to play to our full capabilities.”DiBella said the Leafs are fairly healthy following the Castlegar series.“We’ve got 22 guys eager to get started on the next series,” he said.“We’ve got a few days off now. We’ll practice Monday and get started Tuesday and I think that we’re in good shape to give Beaver Valley a run.”Facing the KIJHL best goalie will be a test for LeafsThere haven’t been many nights when Tallon Kramer has not left the ice a winner for the Nitehawks after starting the game.Similar to how Tyson Brower dominated the crease when the Kimberley Dynamiters won the KIJHL title in 2015, Kramer has owned opposing shooters, posting a league high 28 wins during the regular season and four more in the playoffs.To make matters worse, the Grande Prairie native has lowered his regular season goal average from 1.81 to 1.75 in the playoffs.“(Tallon Kramer) is a premier goalie in the league and we have to show him that we’re prepared to go hard to the net and earn our opportunities,” DiBella said.Nelson has a pretty good goalie of their own heading to the net to open the series Tuesday.Devin Allen, finishing the season with a 3.47 goal average, has put up some pretty good numbers of late, allowing two goals in three games — plus two posting two 1-0 shutouts — as Nelson rallied from a 2-1 deficit against Castlegar.Allen lowered his goal average to 2.04 in the playoffs.last_img read more