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Gerry Raftery: Can We Be Grateful Now?

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first_imgWhatsApp Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook TAGSgerry rafterygratefulgratitudeKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Linkedin Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Advertisementcenter_img Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Previous articleSinn Féin TD says legislation needed to protect employees working from homeNext articleVirtual Riverfest to take place in Limerick this May Bank Holiday weekend Meghann Scully Email Print Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads People photo created by jcomp – www.freepik.comWITH the restrictions in place due to this phase of cocooning mass gatherings are banned for the summer, no music festivals and GAA games are in limbo.Gerry Raftery is the Co-Ordinator of Mindfulness Programmes at Personal Milestones and shares tips on how we can be grateful during this pandemic. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Can We be Grateful Now?It has emerged recently that many of the great events we associate with our Irish summer will not take place.No Saturday or Sunday games, no Concerts in large outdoor venues, no Pilgrimages to Knock, no Galway Races, no Summer Festivals, no Agricultural Shows, no Tidy Towns. Probably there will be no holidays abroad and maybe just limited visits to the seaside at home – weather permitting! And possibly no barbers or hairdressers. A bleak picture!This will be the reality of the summer ahead. So how can we make the most of it?Basically, we need to learn to come to terms with it. Though it will not be easy, we have to Accept it as it is. Acceptance frees us to make the most of what we have. It allows us to begin to discover what’s possible, safe and satisfying within the massive limitations imposed as a result of the danger created by the Coronavirus.I would suggest that one of the ways we can begin to do this is to focus positively on what we have right now, rather than moaning about what we haven’t got in our lives going forward. This brings us into what is known as the Gratitude Space.Today the practice Gratitude is being strongly promoted by Mindfulness and by Positive Psychology as the way to healthy living and happiness in difficult circumstances. I believe that it can be very helpful at this time to focus on being grateful, though in reality it is extremely challenging to do so.The Power of GratitudeSo, what is Gratitude? It is an appreciation of what we have and a recognition of what is good in our lives.Gratitude is something ordinary and every-day. However, Gratitude has a depth and a value which we don’t often recognise. We can take so much for granted. If we apply the power of Gratitude to our lives in the present crisis, we can improve our well-being and find greater happiness.The practice of Gratitude brings us into a very positive space where we count our blessings and recognise all that is good around us. This doesn’t mean ignoring all that is difficult in life or the suffering which surrounds us. It can be a real challenge to be in a positive space at the moment. Gratitude can help us to get there.Focusing on what We HaveWhen we focus on what we have now we become aware of opportunities which we didn’t realise we had before?We certainly have a lot of Time, Time to do things we were too busy to do or neglected to do before. We probably have a lot of time to spend with ourselves. From living in a busy crowded world, we can find ourselves thrust into solitude and silence.But maybe this Solitude and Silence gives us a chance to explore the deeper meaning of our lives and get to know ourselves better. We can learn more ways to develop our mental health, strength and well-being. Is this not something for which we can feel a sense of gratitude?Gratitude brings us to focus on what we have. We focus on our gifts, on our assets and on all of the good things in our lives. We can feel Gratitude for the big things of our lives – the people we love, our own talents and interests, our home and our community.We can become grateful even for the little everyday things – a cup of coffee, the song of the bird or the smell of a flower.Oprah Winfrey says, “Be thankful for what you have and you will end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have you will never, ever have enough.”Gratitude PracticesWhy not allow Gratitude to become a mind-set and allow it to punctuate your day?Begin the day with a sense of Gratitude. As the new day begins be grateful for life and for the opportunities which this new day will surely bring. This enables you to begin the day on a positive and optimistic note.Follow the teaching of Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor and Philosopher: “When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive, to think, to enjoy, to love. Each day provides its own gifts.”One of the Mindfulness Gratitude exercises which I teach people comes from an Oxford Professor of Mindfulness, Mark Williams. People who do this exercise on a regular basis find that it brings them great contentment and peace even in tough times.Professor Williams recommends his ten-finger Gratitude Exercise: “Once a day bring to mind ten things for which you are grateful, counting them on your fingers. It is important to get to ten things, even when it becomes increasingly difficult after three or four! This is exactly what the exercise is for – intentionally bringing into awareness the tiny previously, unnoticed, elements of the day.”Towards the end of your day why not try this exercise?Despite living a quite restricted life at the moment it is amazing how much happens in your day. In the midst of great loss, we can still find blessings to count. Feel grateful and you will end your day feeling good about yourself and about life.Some people find a Gratitude Journal helpful. Just write down the ten things for which you feel grateful at the end of your day. Read back over them and you see how good life really is.We teach our children good manners by telling them to say the magic words, “Please” and “Thanks”. Thanks, can certainly be a magic word for us today.Take care of yourselves through being Grateful. NewsGerry Raftery: Can We Be Grateful Now? By Meghann Scully – April 28, 2020 185 last_img read more

Gauging the Pandemic’s Financial Impact

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first_img July 28, 2020 1,136 Views Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago More than half of mortgage borrowers have lost income due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and close to one in five have missed a payment during the months since the pandemic hit the United States. LendingTree surveyed more than 1,000 borrowers at the end of June to determine how the pandemic is impacting their financial situation and ability to pay their mortgage loans.A total of 53% of borrowers have lost at least some income because of the pandemic, and millennials are the hardest hit. Among millennials, 61% report a loss of income, compared to 57% of Generation X and just 37% of baby boomers.While 82% of borrowers have continued making mortgage payments uninterrupted by the pandemic, the remaining 18% have missed at least one payment. The vast majority of these borrowers have entered a forbearance agreement, but 5% of those who have missed a payment have not entered an agreement with their lender.In total 30% of borrowers across the nation have entered a forbearance agreement with their lender, while another 12% are in the process of applying for mortgage relief.Two percent of survey respondents report being denied for a forbearance plan.LendingTree reported that 44% of those in forbearance plans have an annual household income of $100,000.At the same time, 7% of borrowers with an income of less than $25,000 say they were denied mortgage relief, which is higher than any other income bracket, according to LendingTree.Some borrowers may have been reluctant to enter forbearance because they were unsure of the terms of the relief. Among survey respondents baby boomers were the most likely to be unsure of the terms of forbearance plans. About 37% of baby boomers said they were unclear on the terms, compared to 17% of both Gen Xers and millennials.About two-thirds of borrowers who have lost income say they would consider missing a payment on some type of debt, and of the types of debt payments they would consider missing, mortgage payments were the first choice, closely followed by credit card payments.About 24% of those who might miss a payment said they would miss a mortgage payment, and 23% said they would miss a credit card payment.Also, while many borrowers have entered forbearance plans on their home loans, about 32% have also deferred paying other bills, including auto loans and credit cards, according to LendingTree.“Unfortunately, the response to the coronavirus crisis has been very poor; many layoffs that were temporary are beginning to become permanent, and the economy is likely to remain weak well into 2021,” said Tendayi Kapfidze, Chief Economist at LendingTree. Krista Franks Brock is a professional writer and editor who has covered the mortgage banking and default servicing sectors since 2011. Previously, she served as managing editor of DS News and Southern Distinction, a regional lifestyle publication. Her work has appeared in a variety of print and online publications, including Consumers Digest, Dallas Style and Design, DS News and DSNews.com, MReport and theMReport.com. She holds degrees in journalism and art from the University of Georgia. About Author: Krista F. Brock Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Gauging the Pandemic’s Financial Impact  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: Coronavirus COVID-19 in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal, Market Studies, News Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Fannie Mae Offers Two New Single-Family Green MBS Issuances Next: The Fight Against Zombie Propertiescenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Gauging the Pandemic’s Financial Impact Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Coronavirus COVID-19 2020-07-28 David Wharton Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

Ocean City Bustling With Last Minute Shoppers

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first_imgJill and Chris Clark, of Upper Township, with their son Connor and his friend Aiden Leypoldt, enjoy one of the final shopping days until Christmas in Ocean City Saturday. By Maddy VitaleHoliday shoppers zipped in and out of stores Saturday to buy last minute gifts, treats to bring to family gatherings, and even took time out for a carriage ride.Jill and Chris Clark, of Upper Township, their son Connor, 12, and his friend Aiden Leypoldt, 12, strolled along Asbury Avenue to pick up a few things.“We wanted to come to Ocean City to buy all local stuff today,” Jill Clark said. “We stopped at Wards to get some cookies. Now we are heading to 7th Street Surf Shop. They have really good stuff.”Connor is hoping for a Nintendo this Christmas.“I want a ping pong table,” Aiden said.A steady stream of people filled Rauhauser’s Candies. The top selling chocolate of choice?“Everyone wants chocolate covered pretzels,” said Rauhauser’s employee Tina Mituzas.Linda DiFrancesco, of Ocean City, bought a pound of pretzels filled with caramel, to give to a friend.Denise Oliver, of Seaville, opted for a super sweet convection, when she bought a box of chocolate covered Oreos to take to a party.Delores Holzer, of Upper Township, stopped at 7th Street Surf Shop with grandchildren, Jamie Holzer, of California, in the pink jacket and Grace Malunow, of Robbinsville.Customers also packed 7th Street Surf Shop to get just the right present.“I’m getting a Yeti cup. I’m going to put a gift card in it for my sister to get her car detailed,” Pat Flynn, of Ocean City said.The hottest item at the surf shop is the Onewheel, like a motorized skateboard, it appeals to surfers because some say it feels a bit like surfing – only on land.Colin Devine, manager at 7th Street Surf Shop, gave a Onewheel demonstration.Delores Holzer, of Upper Township, spent the day shopping with her grandkids. They left Hoy’s 5 & 10 and were heading to a children’s store, but had to stop at the surf shop.“I need to get some surf wax,” Holzer said.Her grandchildren, Grace Malunow, of Robbinsville, and Jamie Holzer, of California, checked out some lip balm and trinkets while waiting for their grandmother.Customers also stopped in City 2 Shore Gourmet. The assortment of Wisconsin cheeses, fine olive oils from around the country, balsamic vinegars from Italy, hot pepper jam, peanut butter and cheese spreads and gluten-free granola, made it a great stop for that special gift.While some people were just picking up a few extra gifts, or sweets to take to parties and Christmas dinner, Dan Mactiernan with his children Cavan, 8, and Malley, 7, of Ocean City, still had a lot of shopping left to do for mom.“I have two days to go and she’s all done with her shopping,” Mactiernan joked.By Saturday afternoon, he had already bought her some gifts at B & B Department Store and Making Waves but was on a quest for something extra special. He and his family headed to Tah Dah in hopes of finding a little bling.“We’re looking for an emerald ring,” Mactiernan said.Dan Mactiernan and his children Cavan, on the left, and Malley of Ocean City, do some shopping for mom.Lauren Waltz, owner of Blue Lotus, said Ocean City’s shops offer a variety of interesting gifts.Erin Schiavo, of Longport, said she got exactly what she needed for her cousin from Blue Lotus.“I’m all finished with shopping. That was the last present I needed to get,” Schiavo said. “I did a lot of shopping in Ocean City this season. I like to shop locally. I get everything I need and the selection here is eclectic.”last_img read more

Dig, Plant Perennials

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first_imgAfter watering, cover the bed with 3 inches of pine straw to reduce erosion and raincompaction and to keep the soil cool. This will also prevent early warmup and prematuregrowth. There are several reasons to relocate or at least divide and replant perennials. The mainreason is that many, if not most, perennials grow into large clumps or colonies.Competition for nutrients, water and root space tends to reduce the vigor of the entiregroup. Annual beds, dug every spring, tend to have good porosity and air movement in the soil.Perennial beds, though, are usually left alone and need attention about every three years. Pulling the clumps apart gently, with increasing force, will give you an idea if they comeapart naturally or if you will need a hand pruner to cut connecting roots. My philosophy isthat the fewer roots you cut, rip or tear, the less likely disease will get a foothold. There is another reason replanting perennials is a good idea. Whether you live onpiedmont clay or sandy soils, rainfall, garden foot traffic and gravity slowly compact thesoils. You can use a shovel to divide really tough perennials such as red hot poker, day lily,phlox and swamp sunflower. My experience with perennials, however, leads me to suggestyou divide plants such as hosta, iris, coneflower, shasta daisy and other more fragile,clump-forming perennials by hand. By allowing the plant to reestablish its root system during October, November andDecember, perennials are then well-prepared to endure our winters. A well-establishedroot system will support rapid growth and optimal flowering the following spring. Your perennial bed soil may look mounded by 4-5 inches when you finish. This is a goodsign you have done a good job. Rake the soil evenly into a smooth, slightly sloped mound. Be sure to add 10-10-10 or a similar fertilizer in late spring when the new plants startgrowing. Remember, too, to check the moisture in the newly dug bed. If we have a dryspell in October, you may need to water. Before you do anything, take a soil test to the county Extension Service office. When youget back the lab’s recommendations for amendment and nutrition, then start digging. I like to let fleshy roots, tubers and corms dry out for a day before transplanting. I replantand water-in soft fibrous roots as soon as the bed is prepared. Be sure to pile up dividedperennials out of direct sunlight. Plant your perennials in the soft soil. Do all you can to avoid compact the soil with yourknees and feet. I do this with a 3-inch-thick pile of newspapers to kneel on. Or I use apiece of plywood as a plank. Once the planting is done, irrigate the entire bed with a sprinkler for two to three hours.The bed will settle some. Don’t worry. The bumpy look will vanish by March. Dig up the clump at the edge of the dense root system, knock off the soil carefully andthen feel through the root system for natural clusters or points of separation. Eachperennial is different, but with a little feeling around, it’s usually easy to do. Preparing the bed is simple. Add the recommended amendment, then till or dig to at least12 inches deep. Add only a very little nitrogen to the soil so as not to push new growtheasily killed by frost. Irises, hostas, phlox, liatrises and shasta daisies, for example, will remain vigorous ifdivided about every three years. The next few weeks will be the ideal time to plant new perennials or divide and relocateestablished perennials in Georgia.last_img read more

Bento Boxes

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first_imgFor generations of students, the sandwich has been the center of the sack lunch universe. But today some parents are borrowing lunch ideas from other cultures in an effort to boost variety in their children’s diets.Bento boxes, which, until recently, were used primarily by Japanese schoolchildren, have become increasingly popular in the United States. What separates a bento box from a traditional lunchbox is a series of compartments that hold separate servings of protein, rice, vegetables or fruit.Bento lunches are also known for being cute. The internet is full of bento photos featuring rice mounds painstakingly pressed into the shape of dolphins, and flowers made out of ham slices.Will that effort entice children to try new things? Possibly, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension health and nutrition specialist Alison Berg. But she adds that you don’t have to make every lunch an arts and crafts project to give bento boxes a try.“I think it’s a good option in terms of exposing kids to a larger variety in a way that is developmentally appropriate,” said Berg, who is also an assistant professor of foods and nutrition in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “Finger foods are great for that because kids find them less intimidating.”Bento box lunches usually contain portions of bite-sized pieces of vegetables and fruit, pieces of meat or tea-sized sandwiches and crackers.The key to keeping what is basically a collection of snacks healthy is the ratio. The boxes should have four parts healthy carbohydrates, like whole wheat crackers or molded brown rice; two parts protein, like cheese, lean meats (think turkey, low-fat ham or chicken breast) or chickpeas; one part fruits, like sliced apples; and one part vegetables, like carrot sticks.The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s ChooseMyPlate.gov website has a detailed background on recommended portion sizes for kids of all ages and has some great suggestions for new lunchbox favorites.Unless the lunchbox can be kept cool in a refrigerator or with an ice pack, it’s important to pack food that will be safe to eat at room temperature.One of the key concepts that parents need to remember when introducing new foods into a child’s lunchbox — like swapping those carrot sticks for cauliflower florets — is to keep offering them and to keep some old standbys in there. A bento box full of new foods might result in a hungry kid, but consistently offering one or two new items a day will eventually broaden children’s palates.“Kids might need 20 to 30 exposures to a new food before they will truly accept it. Offering foods in a way that’s fun and easy for them, like finger foods in a bento box, might help speed up the process, and that’s good for kids and their parents,” Berg said.For more information about helping your child to become a more adventurous eater and making better food choices at any age, visit eatright.org.last_img read more

Diego Coasta Gets Eight-game Ban for Abusing Referee

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first_imgAtletico Madrid striker Diego Costa has been banned for eight games after being found guilty of abusing a referee.The former Chelsea player was sent off by Jesus Gil Manzano during Atletico’s 2-0 La Liga defeat by Barcelona.Manzano’s match report said the 30-year-old Spain international had “insulted his mother”, a claim Costa has denied. Diego Costa being sent off from the game Atletico have said they will appeal against the ban, which would rule Costa out of their remaining league fixtures.The Spanish Football Federation gave Costa a four-game suspension for insults to the referee and a further four matches for grabbing the official’s arm.“I asked the referee and he told me Costa said something to him,” Atletico manager Diego Simeone said after Saturday’s game.“Other players have said things and not been sent off, but that does not justify what Costa did.”Atletico are second in La Liga, 11 points behind league leaders Barcelona with seven games remaining.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Vipers hand top job to Kajoba

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first_imgFred Kajoba (left) is handed a T-Shirt by Vipers SC Boss Dr Mulindwa. PHOTO @VipersSCKampala, Uganda | THE INDEPENDENT | Former International goalkeeper Fred Kajoba has been handed the top job at Vipers Sports Club.He takes over from Edward Golola who was sacked early in the week after a string of poor results despite the team being top of the league table.Kajoba,50, started work this morning by meeting the players at St Mary’s Stadium and training ahead of Tuesday’s StarTimes Uganda Premier League match against Mbarara City FC.He will be joined by Ibrahim Mugisha as goalkeeping coach, working alongside Edward Ssali aka Baiano as trainer.In a statement, the club said “Vipers Sports Club can confirm Fred Kajoba has been appointed first-team coach. Management believes that in Kajoba we have a manager with significant experience at the highest level of football, which can come in and immediately help deliver our objectives.” Kajoba said: “I am excited to be joining one of the biggest clubs in the country and it is where it should be at the moment. And am sure we can still go on and win this season’s title.”*****SOURCE: VipersSC MediaShare on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Belle Glade woman arrested in medical marijuana dispensary burglaries

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first_imgPolice arrested a Belle Glade woman who is accused of burglarizing multiple medical marijuana businesses in Palm Beach County.Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Teri Barbera said at 3 a.m. around 30 individuals burglarized the Miracle Leaf medical marijuana business located at 100 Sansbury Way.Police said a group fled the scene of a burglarized medical marijuana dispensary .Deputies were able to stop one of the vehicles involved in the case, which was driven by Nakeria Harris, 24, of Belle Glade.PBSO said Harris confessed to being involved in multiple business burglaries including the Miracle Leaf dispensary. They also found more than $600 worth of products belonging to Miracle Leaf.Harris was arrested Monday morning and was booked at the Palm Beach County Jail.last_img read more