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Limerick hospital still battling trauma surgery backlog

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first_imgLimerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students 64 patients waiting for beds in UHL Numbers of Limerick hospital group staff sidelined by COVID-19 reduces by 162 in past 7 days NewsHealthLimerick hospital still battling trauma surgery backlogBy Bernie English – August 14, 2020 355 “There is extreme overcrowding in UHL this morning” – UHL TAGShealthLimerick City and CountyNewsUHLuniversity hospital limerick Linkedin Print Email University Hospital LimerickUNIVERSITY Hospital Limerick is still battling to deal with a surge in cases which need operating theatre time, including elderly people who fall and break bones.Last week, the Limerick Post reported that a large increase in numbers of admitted patients waiting on trolleys for an in-hospotal bed was largely due to an increase in numbers coming to the ED and an increase in the number of beds needed for trauma patients who were awaiting surgery.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In a statment in reply to a request for an update on the situation by the Limerick Post, a spokesman said that this hospital “remains very busy due to a surge in emergency and trauma theatre cases over the past week. This upswing has continued to impact on patient flow in UHL at a time when significant numbers of unwell patients are attending the hospital’s Emergency Department. “We are sorry that any patient admitted to our hospitals faces a long wait time for a bed. We work to ensure that all patients continue to receive expert medical care while they wait, Between 8am last Wednesday, and 8am this Wednesday, August 8, there was a daily average attendance of 184 patients at the ED. Attendances fell over the weekend (134 on Saturday, 151 on Sunday and 145 on Bank Holiday Monday), but this was preceded by a daily attendance rate in excess of 200 last Wednesday (207), Thursday (204) and Friday (214). Following the significant reduction in emergency presentations during the Covid-19 pandemic (levels for March and April 2020 were 144 and 154 respectively), current weekday attendances at the ED frequently surpass 200. Average daily ED presentations for 2019 were 195. “Patients were waiting in individual bays, on beds or trolleys. Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been no patients on trolleys on corridors in the hospital’s general wards.“Having created capacity for the anticipated Covid-19 surge during March by deferring almost all elective activity, we are now gradually and carefully resuming scheduled care, prioritising care for the sickest patients first. Where patients can safely be seen virtually, this is being facilitated.As part of the Covid precautions, non-Covid patients were diverted to the Acute Surgical Assessment Unit or Acute Medical Unit, “meaning we have effectively been operating three EDs in recent months,” the spokesman said.As part of the drive to bring down the numbers waiting for trauma surgery, the hospital has called in theatre nurses from Ennis and other hospitals in the group so that more theatre time can be offered to patients. As well as identifying patients who can are discharged and treated in the community by specialist teams, the hospital is using the Intermediate Care Facility (ICF) at the University of Limerick. As as of Tuesday morning there were 28 patients being cared for in the facility. Capacity can be further increased in line with demand.center_img Previous articleMunster confirm academy player has tested positive for COVID-19Next articleLimerick Senior Football Championship Preview Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement WhatsApp Facebook Updated statement on service disruptions UL Hospitals Group Twitter 53 patients waiting for beds at UHL last_img read more

Elkhart County 4-H Fair offers drive-thru fair food

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first_img Facebook Pinterest Pinterest CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews (Photo Supplied/Elkhart County 4-H Fair) The pandemic has put a halt to many things, including many summer fairs and festivals, but you can still get a taste of the fair in Elkhart County this June.The Elkhart County 4-H Fair is bringing the food to you with a Fair Food Drive-Thru event. Simply drive your car through the event to pick up your favorite treats.There are rules and requirements to attend the event, such only using cash, staying in your vehicles, and exiting the grounds after ordering and receiving food. Smoking and pets are not permitted, and public restrooms will not be available.The Fair Food Drive-Thru schedule is as follows:Friday, June 5 – Noon to 7pmSaturday, June 6 – Noon to 7pmSunday, June 7 – Noon to 5pmFriday, June 12 – Noon to 7pmSaturday, June 13 – Noon to 7pmSunday, June 14 – Noon to 5pmFriday, June 19 – Noon to 7pmSaturday, June 20 – Noon to 7pmSunday, June 21 – Noon to 5pmA list of vendors, menus and maps will be available early next week. Google+ Twitter Elkhart County 4-H Fair offers drive-thru fair food Google+center_img WhatsApp Facebook By Brooklyne Beatty – May 29, 2020 0 602 Twitter TAGS20/204-Hdrive-thruElkhart CountyfairfoodSummertreats WhatsApp Previous articleI&M reports ongoing scam calls targeting utility customersNext articleThe Elkhart County 4H Fair will not take place in 2020 Brooklyne Beattylast_img read more

Cold Truths

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first_imgWe got our greedy little paws on the hottest new winter gear for serious on-slope testing.Elevation Outdoors Winter Gear Review: Cold Truths1. Rossignol Super 7This big brother of Rossi’s popular S7 came out last season but sold out in no time—for good reason. The Super 7 (145-117-127) took it up a notch. Featuring a layer of strong, supple titanal, the tip-and-tail rockered ski is even beefier and more responsive inbounds than the S7 but has not lost its ego-boosting powder float.$800; rossignol.com2. Black Diamond AMPerageThis is one versatile ski for soft snow. It’s 115 mm underfoot so it certainly floats the soft stuff, but with 21 meters of turn radius, it can also whip around in trees and even cruise the groomers—the ideal do-it-all board.$669; blackdiamondequipment.com3. Jones Hovercraft SplitSnowboarding film star Jeremy Jones designed the Hoverctaft to ride with a lot more versatility, especially in powder, than the usual 156-cm board. Spilt capability makes it a backcountry mountaineering tool that’s still got the guts of a freestyle ride.$699; jonessnowboards.com4. Zeal TranscendTracking speed, altitude and other vitals as you cruise downhill, these are some serious geek goggles. Simply take a glance down at the lower right corner of the lens where a display screen tracks all that data. Even better, when you head home, you can download and analyze your ski session the same way you would with a running or cycling workout.$549; zealoptics.com5. Nordica Firearrow F1While ski design has changed radically over the past decade, getting ridiculously fat and shorter, boots are still built with the mindset of driving drive thin, old-school boards. The Firearrow, however, allows for more ankle articulation for lateral control—just the ticket when you need to make adjustments on skis that are over 100 mm underfoot. Carbon fiber construciton keeps it light.$935; nordica.com6. Outdoor Research AmbitIt’s nearly impossible to operate a smart phone on the slopes while wearing ski gloves, but the fingers of the Ambit use Touch Tec leather, a nanotechnology that makes it so that the material will operate a touch screen just as adroitly as if it were bare skin.$99; outdoorresearch.com7. Columbia Circuit Breaker SoftshellThis soft shell jacket contains a built-in, electronic heating system. Simply press a button and it starts to warm you up at three different temperature settings, yet, it’s still light and breathable enough for athletic skiing and skinning. It’s a tad bulky with two battery packs that take up a bit of space in the chest, but that inconvenience is worth it for the pleasure of heat on demand.$850; columbia.com8. Backcountry Access Float 18BCA’s newest avalanche bag, which works by giving a skier trapped in a slide enough bouyancy to rocket to the surface, was designed for the sidecountry. The 18-liter pack is low-profile enough for the resort, while still offering the technology found in larger, heavier bags.$685; backcountryaccess.comlast_img read more

Brazilian Army Trains 86 Jungle Warriors

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first_imgBy Andréa Barretto/Diálogo October 10, 2017 On September 20th, 86 students in the Jungle Operations Course (COS, per its Portuguese acronym) finally earned the diploma that certifies them as “jungle warriors.” The graduation took place at the Jungle Warfare Training Center (CIGS, per its Portuguese acronym) in Manaus following 10 weeks of activities. This group of warriors included members of the Brazilian Armed Forces, Military Police professionals, and even partner nation service members. Known for the rigorous requirements the course places on its students, there were 115 service members registered when it began on July 10th. The daily difficulties faced over the length of the course were the cause of these dropouts. “We had a success rate of 73 percent in this edition of the course. That was a very good average,” Brazilian Army (EB, per its Portuguese acronym) Lieutenant Colonel Alexandre Amorim de Andrade, the chief of the Training Division at CIGS, said. “That rate has been going up because trainee selection has been getting better,” he acknowledged. COS takes place twice a year: once in the first semester and again in the second. Only members of the military serving in units based in the Amazon jungle may apply, but foreign service members from nations with which Brazil maintains friendly relations may also apply. To do so, they undergo physical tests in swimming, running, rope climbing, and obstacle courses at their home duty stations. Later, they undergo medical testing at CIGS headquarters and repeat the same tests as before while also being tested on their military knowledge one week before the start of the course. Once accepted, they each remove their name, rank, and badge from their uniforms. In place of those items, they each get a hat with a numbered white card on it. Over the next two and a half months, their number will be their new name. “This is to show that all of the students are the same. There isn’t any hierarchy among the students,” EB Captain Rafael Cristofari, who was first in his class and serves as an operations officer for the Amapá Border Command and the 34th Jungle Infantry Battalion, stated. Attrition Lt. Col. Amorim said that the voluntary withdrawals were due to some service members’ physical limitations and their technical limitations as well. Others stopped due to emotional issues, such as homesickness, and there was one student who was unable to continue because he broke his collarbone and could no longer carry his rucksack. There was yet a third reason: lack of technical success. “To measure success, ongoing assessments are made throughout the course. So, the soldier has to meet a minimum standard of expectations relating to their jungle warfare abilities. If they don’t meet that standard, they may be dropped,” Lt. Col. Amorim added. That decision is made after the matter has been discussed by the course’s teacher council. Capt. Cristofari said that he had been determined to make it through to the end of the course. The thought of dropping out never crossed his mind. Instead, for him, the hardest thing to overcome wasn’t the exhausting activities or the lack of sleep but being away from his family. “That’s what weighs most on you, especially for service members who are married with children,” the jungle warrior confessed. During the 10-week training, COS students can have contact with the outside only by phone during their recess periods, which occur during the transitions from one phase of the course to another. The recess periods vary from 12 to 36 hours and mainly serve as time for service members to wash their uniforms and maintain their gear. After the activities have finished, the instructors also allow for shorter breaks of up to 24 hours, when needed. From simple to complex COS training is structured in three phases. The first is called Life in the Jungle and lasts a week and a half, during which time the student is introduced to the main features of the Amazon environment. The goal of this initial stage is to develop jungle survival skills. Next comes the Special Techniques phase. For two and a half weeks, the students learn techniques, tactics, and procedures linked to orienteering, swimming, and firing, which are the skills needed for carrying out a jungle operation. “The swimming part is very important because, in the Amazon, the troops travel extensively along rivers,” Capt. Cristofari underscored. Orienteering is the ability to locate oneself and move from point to point, taking into account the special characteristics of the jungle where there are no clear points of reference, which requires the student to rely on the aid of a map and a compass. In the jungle, the distance from which you can locate a target is much closer than in other environments, Capt. Cristofari said. “In an environment like a desert forest, for example, the troops are able to see a target 500 meters away. In the jungle, it’s all covered in vegetation, and the troops are only able to see targets up to about 20 meters away,” he explained. Thus, these characteristics are worked on with the students so that they can learn how to use their weaponry in the best way. The culmination of the course is in the third phase, which is focused on conducting six weeks of operations. It begins with simpler training events related to reconnaissance patrols and then advances to more complex missions, covering all those that are in the curriculum for the Amazon region, especially on stretches of the border. “These are mock situations that the students will later experience when they return to their squads,” Lt. Col. Amorim stated. International interest COS has developed a good reputation abroad, and, for many years, CIGS has been receiving foreign service members who train together with the Brazilians. Meanwhile, a training geared exclusively to foreigners was created in 2016: the International Jungle Operations Traineeship. Now, the traineeship is being renamed the International Jungle Operations Course (CIOS, per its Portuguese acronym) and runs for five weeks, from October 9th to November 17th, instead of four, as in 2016. Lt. Col. Amorim said that the Amazon Military Command has invited 35 nations to participate in CIOS. The United States and Peru have already confirmed that they have sent service members there.last_img read more

The Elephant Explosion

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first_imgThe title is not intended to suggest pieces of pachyderm flying all over the place, but rather one paleontologist’s theory about the rapid pace of elephant evolution 60 million years ago.  He bases his ideas on a small fossil he found in Morocco.  According to him, the primitive ancestor of all elephants (order Proboscidea) lived 5 million years earlier than thought, and gave rise to “one of the most spectacular examples of morphological evolution known in Mammalia” that occurred in “a rapid and basically explosive placental radiation.”    Emmanuel Gheerbrant, a paleontologist in Paris, described his fossil Eritherium azzouzorum in PNAS.1  His evolutionary story was picked up by Jeanna Bryner at Live Science who wrote about the “oldest elephant relative found.”  Elephant?  Bryner admitted, “the animal would not have looked much like an elephant.  It was just 1.6 to 2 feet (50 to 60 cm) long and weighed 9 to 11 pounds (4 to 5 kg).”  That’s compared to a modern elephant standing 11 feet tall at the shoulder and weighing 5 tons.  New Scientist joined in, saying that “You wouldn’t have recognized Eritherium as an elephant when it was roaming Morocco 60 million years ago… But detailed study of the newly discovered fossil’s teeth, jaws and skull shows it to be the oldest member yet found of the order Proboscidea, of which elephants are the only living survivors.”  New Scientist hoped that “The new find may shed light on the origins of elephants and other mammals… It shows elephants were making evolutionary progress 5 million years after the dinosaurs died out.”    Since pachyderms didn’t evolve till 34 million years ago, Darwin apparently shipped the trunk 26 million years late.  How, then, could Gheerbrant call this an ancestor of the gentle giants we know and live in the local zoo?  Bryner explained, “The animal’s relation to elephants was determined via analysis of the specimen’s teeth and skull.  While it lacked a trunk, the animal had an enlarged first incisor, which researcher Emmanuel Gheerbrant of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, France, says represents a primitive tusk.”  It is doubtful that this little animal used a tooth enlarged by millimeters to pull down trees.    That word “primitive” was indeed found all over Gheerbrant’s paper (used 19 times).  Yet for the animal itself, its features would have seemed well adapted for its own environment.  Is not the word “primitive” a judgment call by the paleontologist assuming it was “making evolutionary progress” from primitive to advanced?  That idea would be guilty of circular reasoning.  Another kind of circularity was revealed in the dating of the fossil.  The estimate of 60 million years was based entirely on index fossils and stratigraphy – both of which assume the evolutionary dating scheme the author was trying to use to establish the fossil’s time and place in evolutionary history.    A look through the scientific paper reveals other statements that cast doubt on the author’s confidence that this fossil has anything to do with the evolution of elephants.  For one thing, the photo of the fossil pieces shows no postcranial anatomy.  His judgment was made entirely on pieces of skull and jaw and five teeth.  None of the teeth looks anything like a primitive tusk – nor did he claim so in the paper, regardless of what he told the press.    For another, placement of this fossil in a phylogenetic position with the Proboscidea involved numerous human judgment calls on his part.  He had to juggle which pieces of evidence, based on tiny measurements from the fragmentary fossil, represent plesiomorphies (traits present before the common ancestor), synapomorphies (traits present in the common ancestor), and homoplasies (unrelated but similar traits attributed to “convergent evolution”).  Of the latter, his table listed 11 homoplasies with other unrelated groups.  The factors he considered worthy were then plugged into computer software that tried to build an evolutionary tree out of them.  The outcome of tree-building software, however, can vary widely depending on the criteria inserted or left out, the relative weighting of factors, the algorithm used, and the outgroup selected (see 07/26/2008, 06/26/2008, 10/15/2003, and especially 10/01/2005 and 07/25/2002).    The following quotes reveal something of the contradictory data, the gaps in empirical data from fossils, and the juggling involved in reaching a conclusion.  Notice how his best fit was obtained with his own previous work – raising additional questions about objectivity:The TNT unweighted parsimony analysis including Eritherium yields a very poorly resolved consensus tree mainly resulting from the unstable position of Khamsaconus.  Analysis without Khamsaconus shows that, besides the robust proboscidean relationships of Eritherium, basal relationships among paenungulates remain unstable, as illustrated by the basal polytomy in the consensus (Fig. 3A).  This polytomy is basically related to our poor fossil knowledge of the ancestral morphotype of several orders such as Embrithopoda, Desmostylia, and Anthracobunia.  Our analysis supports a Sirenia-Desmostylia clade sister group of Proboscidea within Tethytheria.  The standard TNT “implied weighting” analysis yields a topology (Fig. 3B), which is nearly identical to that of Gheerbrant et al.Here’s another quote that reveals multiple levels of subjectivity:2The bunodont incipient lophodont morphotype is derived relative to the eutherian condition, and it is distinct from the perissodactyl pattern.  This morphotype is an additional morphological character and one of the most remarkable dental characters reported for close relationships of paenungulates, macroscelideans, and louisinines.  However, our parsimony analysis does not formally support sister-group relationships of the Macroscelidea plus Louisininae and the Paenungulata by contrast to molecular and recent morphological analyses advocating the Afrotheria clade.  The recovered topology (Fig. 3) shows a sister-group relationship of Laurasian lophodont ungulates such as perissodactyls to paenungulates, instead of the macroscelideans (and louisinines).  Similarly, our analysis does not discriminate clearly Laurasian (e.g., phenacodontids) and African (e.g., Ocepeia) “condylarths” as possible early ungulate representatives of molecular laurasiatherian and afrotherian clades.  Fossils gaps, and especially for African taxa, most probably explain poorly resolved cladistic basal relationships of the Paenungulata in our tree (Fig. 3).  These gaps are illustrated by our poor knowledge of the ancestral morphotype of several key paenungulates orders; for instance, the ancestral relative size of the last molar in paenungulates is challenged by Eritherium (M33 not enlarged).  At lower level in the tree, the morphological and fossil gap is even worse for the phylogenetic analysis of the superordinal clade Afrotheria including Tenrecoidea and Tubulidentata, which are excluded from this study because of the lack of Paleogene data.  In this respect, the cladistic study of Eritherium does not help to test the question of the macroscelidean position within Afrotheria.  However, Eritherium dental morphology argues for a bunodont-lophodont, i.e., ungulatelike, ancestral morphotype for the Paenungulata, Louisininae, and Macroscelidea, within putative Afrotheria.A lot of his evolutionary reasoning, therefore, depends on tiny measurements of tooth shape and systematic gaps in fossil evidence.  The “ancestral morphotype” exists only in the evolutionist’s imagination.    Given these empirical problems, it does not appear even possible to arrive at a definitive evolutionary analysis from the fossil evidence.  This creature could have been called one more well-adapted, extinct mammal, like many other well-adapted, extinct mammals, and left at that.  The story of evolution, however, is what received prominence.  Gheerbrant spoke of a “rapid paenungulate radiation at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) transition” several times.  In fact, it was this story line that excused the lack of evidence: “Rapid paenungulate radiation and fossil gaps may explain poorly resolved interordinal relationships,” he said at one point.  The elephants-to-be must have been evolving so quickly they didn’t have time to leave any fossils.  In fact, this rapid evolution involved more than the Proboscidea: there was a “rapid and basically explosive placental radiation,” he said.  That explosion involved all the post-Cretaceous placental mammals.    So here is another explosion to add to the Cambrian explosion: a “basically explosive placental radiation” that was used to support evolutionary theory, as was the Cambrian explosion, by the lack of evidence for it (see 05/10/2008).1.  Emmanuel Gheerbrant, “Paleocene emergence of elephant relatives and the rapid radiation of African ungulates,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, print June 22, 2009, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0900251106.2.  Note: the reader does not need to understand the jargon to get a sense of the fudging that goes on.  Curious readers can use Dictionary.com for definitions and the Reference.com page on cladistic analysis.Day by day, we expose the unscientific divination practices of the Darwin sooth-slayers.  Don’t be intimidated by the jargon.  You can look it up.  Learn to perceive the methods, omissions, assumptions and philosophy that makes these modern-day shamans pretend to be doing science, when they are really practicing divination to conjure up the Will of Darwin.(Visited 64 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Square Kilometre Array book published

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first_imgThe Square Kilometre Array (SKA) global radio telescope project – which includes a first phase site in South Africa – published a book this month on the project’s progress. It features photos and analysis from some of the best science, astronomy and engineering minds in the world. The first phase of the SKA radio telescope project, called MeerKAT, is being installed in the Karoo desert. It will eventually form part of the first phase of the SKA programme. By September 2015, seven of the 64 dish installations have been constructed and tested. The global SKA project is scheduled to be completed by 2024. (Image: SKA MeerKAT)• SKA: answering the big questions about the universe • SKA will boost Africa’s presence in science fields• SKA will drive growth of Africa’s human capital• Africa to co-host Square Kilometre Array A new, updated two-volume book on the history and the science of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) international radio telescope project was published in September 2015. South Africa is very much at the forefront of the SKA project; the MeerKAT telescope system, currently being constructed and tested in the Karoo desert, forms part of the first phase of the global SKA venture.The chapters in this new book reflect both the science undertaken with the SKA, including ground-breaking research in cosmology and the study of dark matter and dark energy, as well as the global efforts by engineers and the science community to co-ordinate and construct such a massive international project.Once completed, hopefully by 2024, SKA will interconnect a series of radio telescope systems in 10 countries in order to search space for a better understanding about the universe and solve some of the secrets of fundamental physics.  What is SKA? SKA is one of the largest global science projects ever undertaken, featuring a multinational representation of scientists, engineers and astronomers. The positioning of the African continent and the accommodating climate make South Africa a vital component of the project’s success. (Image: SKA/MeerKAT)The Square Kilometre Array project is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope, led by SKA Organisation. The SKA will conduct transformational science to improve understanding of the universe and the laws of fundamental physics, monitoring the sky in unprecedented detail and mapping it hundreds of times faster than any current facility.The SKA is not a single telescope; rather, it is a collection of telescopes or instruments, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA is to be constructed in two phases: Phase 1 (called SKA1) in South Africa and Australia; Phase 2 (called SKA2) expanding into other African countries, with the component in Australia also being expanded.With support from Australia, Canada, China, India, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Sweden, The Netherlands and the UK, the SKA project has on board some of the world’s best scientists, engineers and policy makers. And over 100 companies and research institutions across 20 countries are involved in the design and development of the telescope.SKA: the book With 135 chapters, 1 200 contributors and 2 000 pages on the science behind the SKA project, its official companion book is titled Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array. It is available to download free from the SKA website. (Image: SKA/MeerKAT) The book, titled Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array, consists of 2 000 pages in more than a hundred chapters, with contributions from more than 1 000 experts, scientists and members of the SKA organisation on astrophysics, cosmology and the search for answers in the universe, all within the context of radio telescope technology. Accompanied by a variety of photos and infographics covering the science and construction of the SKA system, the book is the authoritative guide on how this global initiative will work. It tracks the progress made on the project since 2004, highlighting the work being done in Australia, South Africa and other African countries including Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia and Zambia.“The publication of the new SKA science book is the culmination of more than a year’s work by the SKA science team and the scientific community at large,” says Dr Robert Braun, the SKA science director in a release publicising the book. “It’s also a great testimony to the growing interest and scope of the SKA.”According to the publishers, the book deals with SKA’s search for life in the universe through the study of molecules in forming planetary systems and the search for potential radio signals from intelligent civilisations. The search for answers from “the cosmic dawn” – the first billion years of the universe’s existence – will not only inform the past, but also give the world a look at what might happen to the cosmos in the future.SKA and the NDP Construction of the South African SKA radio telescope project infrastructure, called MeerKAT, in the Karoo desert in March 2014. By September 2015, seven of the 64 dish installations have been constructed and tested. The global SKA project is set to be completed by 2024. (Image: SKA MeerKAT) The SKA project in South Africa fulfils the requisites for some vital pillars of the National Development Plan Vision 2030, including skills development through increased job opportunities and training during the construction of the MeerKAT facility, using local labour and top South Africa engineering and science talent.The project also addresses other NDP pillars such as creating efficient, world-class infrastructure networks and developing rural communities.  Construction of the South African SKA radio telescope project infrastructure, called MeerKAT, in the Karoo desert during March 2014. By September 2015, seven of the 64 dish installations have been constructed and tested. The global SKA project is set to be completed by 2024. (Image: SKA MeerKAT) A MeerKAT in the Karoo The first phase of the SKA radio telescope project, called MeerKAT, is currently being installed in the Karoo desert and will eventually form part of the first phase of the SKA programme. By September 2015, seven of the 64 dish installations have been constructed and tested. The global SKA project is set to be completed by 2024.  Infographic: SKA MeerKAT Further reading: Everything you need to know about the SKA project, including MeerKAT and the new booklast_img read more

MSME Expo Empowering entrepreneurial India

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first_imgThe Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises Development Forum (MSME-DF), a professionally managed non-profit organization working for the growth and promotion of enterprises, startups and youth of India, is organizing its 5th India International MSME Startup Expo 2018.It will be held from June 22 – 24 in hall no. 7 at Pragati Maidan.15-20 countries including Afganistan, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Thailand, and Poland will be participating in the expo which is likely to have 200 plus stalls and a footfall of 20,000 people. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfConveying his best wishes for the event, Prime minister Narendra Modi said, “Our government has full faith in the entrepreneurial spirit of the present generation and their energy and passion is critical in realising a new India. This belief is the basis of our initiatives including ‘Start-up India’, ‘Stand-up India’, ‘Make in India’ and other related programmes. It is appreciable that the MSME Development Forum is undertaking this important endeavour in providing an opportunity for the Start-ups in the sector to leverage the latest innovations and practices across the globe,” The mega-event will rediscover ease of doing business and opportunities in different states of India. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe triangular network will expand the spectrum of this expo.Apart from this, startup fest, small industries trade fair, funding and finance fair, vendor development fest and ease of doing business summit are also the main attractions of the event.It will provide a one-stop global platform to connect, network, partner and share information with domestic and International SMEs to find new business opportunities.The initiative has been supported by Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises, Ministry of Commerce and Industry (ITPO, DIPP, Invest India, and GEM), Ministry of Sciences and Technology/ IT and Electronics/ Finance etc.Senior ministers, State Chief Ministers, Bureaucrats and exhibitors from all parts of the country are likely to be present at the event.last_img read more

200 Bitcoins stolen from Electrum wallet in an ongoing phishing attack

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first_imgPopular Bitcoin wallet Electrum and Bitcoin Cash wallet Electron Cash are subject to an ongoing phishing attack. The hacker, or hackers, have already got away with over 200 Bitcoin (around $718,000 as of press) and with the attack still ongoing, it is quite possible that they get away with much more. The phishing attack urged wallet users to download and install a malicious software update from an unauthorized GitHub repository, according to ZDNet. The hack began last Friday i.e on December 21, and the vulnerability at the heart of this attack has remained unpatched. The official Electrum blog at GitHub says that the wallet’s admins privately received a screenshot from a German chat room, in response to the issue where new malware was being distributed that disguises itself as the “real” Electrum. Source: GitHub Immediately after investigating the reasons for the error message, they silently made mitigations in 5248613 and 5dc240d; and released Electrum wallet version 3.3.2. The attacker then stopped with the phishing attack, temporarily. Yesterday, one of the electrum developers-SomberNight, announced on GitHub that the attacker has started the malicious activity again.  Electrum wallet admins are taking steps to mitigate its usability for the attacker. Execution of the ongoing phishing attack In order to launch such a major attack, the attacker added tens of malicious servers to the Electrum wallet network. When users of legitimate Electrum wallets initiate a Bitcoin transaction, and if the transaction reaches one of the malicious servers, the servers reply with an error message urging users to download a wallet app update from a malicious website (GitHub repo). If the user clicks the given link, the malicious update gets downloaded following which the app asks the user for a two-factor authentication (2FA) code. However, these 2FA codes are only requested before sending funds, and not at wallet startup. This stealthily obtains users’ 2FA code to steal their funds and transfer them to the attacker’s Bitcoin addresses. The major drawback here is that Electrum servers are allowed to trigger popups with custom text inside users’ wallets. Steps taken by Electrum admins to create user awareness The developers at Electrum, have updated Electrum the wallet so that whenever an attacker sends a malicious message, the message does not appear like a rich-text-based organized message. Instead, the user receives a non-formatted error that looks more like unreadable code. This alerts the user that the transaction is malicious and not a legitimate one. Following is the screenshot of how the ongoing attack looks in the new Electrum wallet version: Source: GitHub Blockchain reporter says that “The Electrum Development team has identified some 33 malicious Electrum servers, though the total number is suspected to be between 40 and 50.” You can head over to Reddit for more insights on this news. Read Next Malicious code in npm ‘event-stream’ package targets a bitcoin wallet and causes 8 million downloads in two months There and back again: Decrypting Bitcoin`s 2017 journey from $1000 to $20000 Bitcoin Core escapes a collapse from a Denial-of-Service vulnerabilitylast_img