Edinburgh target double away win

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first_img Edinburgh Rugby head coach Michael Bradley has made just one change to the starting line-up that defeated Treviso at the Stadio Monigo last weekend (22-11) for the club’s Heineken Cup opener against Aviva Premiership side, London Irish, at the Medejski Stadium tomorrow (kick-off 1.30pm).Stuart McInally moves up from the bench to number 8 at the expense of Fijian internationalist Netani Talei, with his promotion making space for Roddy Grant.The squad has been boosted by the return of lock/flanker, Sean Cox, who returns for his first match following a knee injury sustained against Scarlets last month, and centre James King, who come in for Steven Turnbull and Chris Leck respectively.The stability in selection means that Bradley has shown faith in his young performers with stand-off Harry Leonard (who scored all but five of the points in the Treviso match), centre Matt Scott and lock Grant Gilchrist making their Heineken Cup debut while full-back Tom Brown is set to do likewise if called upon from the bench. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LONDON, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 31: Heineken match balls on the turf at the Heineken Cup Launch at Twickenham Stadium on October 31, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images for ERC) Starting XV:15 Jim Thompson14 Lee Jones13 Nick de Luca12 Matt Scott11 Tim Visser10 Harry Leonard9 Mike Blair1 Allan Jacobsen2 Ross Ford CAPTAIN3 Geoff Cross4 Esteban Lozada5 Grant Gilchrist6 David Denton7 Ross Rennie8 Stuart McInally Substitutes16 Steven Lawrie17 Kyle Traynor18 Lewis Niven19 Sean Cox20 Roddy Grant21 Greig Laidlaw22 James King23 Tom BrownReferee:Romain Poite (FFR)last_img read more

Highlanders sign All Black prop Tony Woodcock

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first_imgAUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – MAY 09: Tony Woodcock of the Blues warms up before an Auckland Blues Super Rugby training session at Unitec on May 9, 2012 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Winning wonder: All Black’s prop Tony Woodcock has signed a two-year deal with the HighlandersWORLD CUP winning All Black, Tony Woodcock, has signed with the Highlanders for a two-year period and will join the franchise for the 2013 Super Rugby competition.31 year old Woodcock was born in Helensville, and made his 1st class debut for North Harbour in 2000. He has played 113 super Rugby games for the Blues and 88 tests for the All Blacks.Highlanders Head Coach, Jamie Joseph, was excited by the prospect of getting the All Black front-rower into the Highlanders camp.center_img ‘Tony is a world-class loosehead prop and his ability and experience will add a huge amount to our squad and leadership. Tony is also a good fit for the Highlanders and I know he is looking forward to moving his family to Dunedin to set-up home in the South’Woodcock is currently in camp with the All Blacks preparing for The Rugby Championship game in La Plata against Argentina.last_img read more

The arduous rehab getting Ben Foden ready for the World Cup

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first_imgListening back to that and talking positively with Farrell are happy distractions from the arduous and sometimes painful rehab. But if he makes his second World Cup it will all be worth it.Ben Foden is an Emirates ambassador for Rugby, encouraging young fans to find the flag hidden in Birmingham today to win the chance to lead a team out at Rugby World Cup 2015. Visit Emirates Facebook, Twitter of Instagram to follow the #EmiratesFlag LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS If Ben Foden is fit in time for the Rugby World Cup, and selected, it won’t so much be a miracle as the blessed result of some tortuous rehabilitation for a damaged anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee.In announcing his World Cup training squad, England head coach Stuart Lancaster threw Foden a lifeline, singling the Northampton Saints full-back out as someone who was still in his thoughts, despite missing the second half of the season and not being named in the coach’s 50-man group. It’s already a pretty busy squad that is fit and raring to go, but pushed on by hard work abroad and the faith of England’s coaches, Foden is targeting England’s first warm-up game against France on 15 August.“The England lads will have four weeks of conditioning and not rugby or tackling,” Foden tells Rugby World of England’s upcoming training camps. “Obviously for me it’s a race against time (to get there). I’d spoken to Andy Farrell and to join in with the guys I have to be at the right level. I’ve just done my first week of running, coming into my second week now, and to get up to the live stuff with the others I need to be accelerating and decelerating at 100%. But the knee feels good.”Foden will have the disappointment of continuing to train in isolation a lot of the time, as he has done for the last few months, as many Saints team-mates take in a holiday following their Aviva Premiership semi-final defeat to Saracens. But he has been through worst on his quest to regain fitness. He spent a fortnight in Philadelphia with Bill Knowles, the man who helped rehabilitate Tiger Woods, Jonny Wilkinson and many downhill skiers. It could be rough at times.“Bill got physios to get right into the muscle tissue. It wasn’t pleasant, even if it was useful. They would have metal tools digging into you.“What Bill does is let you know where your body is at. So it’s not just about your knee, but your hips and your lower back. I’d hurt my ACL but I’d also previously hurt the PCL in my right knee. Your body has different ways of breaking down. So a lot was about letting you know how to run again.“This was about getting the full range of movement of your knee over your foot, making sure your running angles are good. Our physio came out for the second week and we’d send videos back so we could see everything.” Back in white: Foden in action for England in a non-capped match in 2014 center_img TAGS: Northampton Saints Ben Foden prepares for the Emirates Find the Flag competition in Birmingham, which will see him hide the flag in the city today for fans to find it, snap a selfie and win the chance to lead out a team at Rugby World Cup 2015Foden admits that this ordeal has forced him to re-evaluate the way he treats his body. He is coming up for 30 and if he is to play until he is 35 he must stop taking the little efforts for granted. The prodding, pain and rehabilitation surely makes sure of that. Look at his current regime.He explains that to get where he needs to be he is doing a lot of basic mechanics work. A lot of lunging, that will hopefully build up into squats. He is doing deadlifts with a hexagonal bar. He is doing a lot of pool work that “feels like I am drowning a lot of the time”, as he splashes around for a conditioning session with modified flippers on his feet. He is doing some bike work with intense sessions so that “my lungs are still there and I’m not plodding when I do get back out there”. He is working his way into a few more pitch-based running sessions, with the ultimate goal of getting back to his explosive best; the level of exciting play that saw him come into consideration in January before injury knocked him out of Six Nations contention.Of course, while all of this toil sounds tough and at times frustrating, it is the faith of England’s elite coaches that keeps him going.“When I got the phone call from the medics to tell me I’d done my ACL, my heart broke in my chest a little. I was pretty down in the dumps. But Lanny (Lancaster) called me and gave me something to aim for – 15 August and that first warm-up, aimed at the World Cup. I’ve still got that voicemail saved on my phone.”last_img read more

Future of former All Black Julian Savea up in the air after savaging from Toulon boss

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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Up in the air: Julian Savea takes a catch for Toulon against Stade Francais (Getty Images) Stay Strong my brother, it’s a difficult season for the team, we’ll be good at team, we need you. there will be better days. https://t.co/W7uFZiKQRs— Mathieu Bastareaud (@BastaOfficiel) February 18, 2019 The winger has fallen foul of Toulon’s outspoken president Mourad Boudjellal, who said to media after a recent defeat “he is no longer welcome in Toulon!” She also gave her followers a timely reminder that abuse which goes beyond mere criticism and into abuse can have a seriously damaging affect on a player’s mental wellbeing. As well as the below she also tweeted: “And people wonder why mental health in rugby had become a big problem. Take a minute to be considerate of people’s feelings instead of bashing them behind a keyboard or phone screen.” Putting all the negativity behind me and heading into this week with a positive attitudewhether I am welcomed or not I am still contracted to my team and I will continue to train week in and week out with my brothers #endofstory #letsmoveon pic.twitter.com/y7QBqLOyVV— Julian Savea (@juliansavea7) February 17, 2019Savea’s wife, Fatima, also took to social media to highlight some of the horrific comments directed at the out-of-form wing online. This type of carry on from @mouradrct won’t exactly entice other players to play for @RCTofficiel ..Business or not you just don’t treat ppl like this.Good luck wherever you play next bro! @juliansavea7 https://t.co/rIYHm9QQHL— Drew Mitchell (@drew_mitchell) February 17, 2019Toulon’s next league match will be against Pau, who are one point and one place above them in the Top 14 table. Take a minute to think about how your words can affect someone’s life and their mental health.— T I M A (@_timasavea) February 16, 2019Today other’s from the team came out in support, too. Absolutely disgusted by this shit. pic.twitter.com/TZzU1pRIpu— T I M A (@_timasavea) February 17, 2019 Future of former All Black Julian Savea up in the air after savaging from Toulon bossJulian Savea left New Zealand considered one of the most lethal wingers in world rugby, with 46 tries in 54 Tests for the All Blacks. But things have failed to spark for him this season at Toulon. And after the French giants took their tenth Top 14 defeat for the season, falling 19-10 to Agen and lying in 11th place in the league, the club’s president took out his anger on the wing.Talking to French publication RMC Sport, the famously outspoken Mourad Boudjellal said: “I’m going to ask for a DNA test. It is not Savea that we recreated but ‘Savéapas’.“He must have changed on the plane. If I were him, I would apologise and I would go home. When we reach this level of play, we must apologise and leave.Related: Anatomy of a Top 14 rugby transfer“I told him he was released and he was no longer welcome in Toulon!”As you can imagine, this savage outburst from Boudjellal has drawn international attention. However, Savea, 28, gave a calm and measure response to the Toulon supremo’s comments, as you can see below. It remains to be seen if Savea will be involved with the club at all going forward.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter for the latest news in rugby.last_img read more

El Salvador: Youth group studies brutal history in context

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first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Youth & Young Adults Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA marvin alexander says: Chuck Stewart interprets for a youth group from the Episcopal Diocese of Central New York during a visit to El Mozote, the site where in 1981 government troops massacred 800 residents of the village. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Driving into the small, tranquil village of El Mozote, it’s difficult to comprehend that one of the largest violations of human rights in the modern Americas occurred there 31 years ago.The Inter-American Human Rights Court called the 1981 killings in and around El Mozote “a systematic plan of repression” carried out by El Salvador’s military during the civil war.Between Dec. 11 and 13 of that year, government soldiers shot dead more than 800 people, more than half of them children, in what was the largest massacre during El Salvador’s 12-year conflict that killed some 75,000 people.“It reminded me of My Lai,” where U.S. Army soldiers murdered more than 300 unarmed civilians in South Vietnam in 1968, said Audrey Cleaver-Bartholomew after visiting the El Mozote memorial as part of an Episcopal youth pilgrimage.Audrey Cleaver-Bartholomew, foreground, and Pilar Padrón during a visit to the Museum of the Salvadoran Revolution. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceCleaver-Bartholomew studied the 1990s ethnic cleansing in the former Yugoslavia and the My Lai Massacre in high school genocide class, but the El Mozote Massacre wasn’t mentioned, she said.In El Mozote, the soldiers carried out the massacre over two-and-a-half days, said Cleaver-Bartholomew, 19. “[The soldiers] had time to think about it. It was so systematic. What can get people to that point?”“You can understand the details, but not the motives,” she added.The youth group – six girls aged 14 to 19 – visited many of El Salvador’s historic sites, including the Chapel of Divine Providence Hospital, where Roman Catholic Archbishop Oscar A. Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980; the Romero Center and Museum of the Martyrs at the University of Central America; the Monument to Memory and Truth, which lists the names of people killed during the civil war; the Museum of the Salvadoran Revolution; and El Mozote, the site of the 1981 massacre.The Episcopal Diocese of Central New York and the Anglican-Episcopal Church of El Salvador have been in a companion relationship, formally and informally, for 20 years, said Chuck Stewart, chair of the companion diocese committee and a member of St. James in Skaneateles.It was the seventh youth pilgrimage Stewart had led to El Salvador.The trip aimed to expose the young people to a different culture, “yet show them that people here have the same aspirations,” said Stewart. In the more than 20 trips he has made to El Salvador over the years, he added, “I’ve learned that people are the same everywhere, they can be joyful and happy in grinding poverty.”Besides visiting the various historical sites, the group also traveled to communities of extreme poverty assisted by the church and Foundation Cristosal, a human rights-based community-development organization.One thing Cleaver-Bartholomew noted toward the end of the weeklong visit to El Salvador was that, despite the history of violence and the violent current reality – El Salvador has one of the highest murder rates in the world – people live in relative peace, without the everyday anxieties suffered by people of affluence.“You’d think it would be the opposite,” said Cleaver-Bartholomew. “I’d heard about El Salvador before I came, but it doesn’t add up until you get here.”The group descends from the hill where some of the women and children were said to have been massacred in El Mozote. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFrom 1980-1992, El Salvador suffered a brutal civil war fought between its U.S.-backed, military led-government and a coalition of guerilla groups, organized as the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front, or FMLN. The war was fueled mostly by the gross inequalities that existed between a small group of wealthy elites who controlled the government and the economy and the majority of the population that lived in extreme poverty.Pilar Padrón, one of the group’s chaperones, first visited El Salvador on a similar youth trip from Central New York.“The last time I came down I was their age,” said Padrón. “It changed my life so much, I’m excited to see how they are changed.”Padrón first visited El Salvador when she was 16. She previously had visited the Dominican Republic, where her father was born. Still, she said, nothing prepared her for the poverty and the resiliency she witnessed.“It made me feel like I wanted to do more for them … It opened my eyes to suffering and showed me that there are ways that we can help,” she said, adding that afterward she began to feel called to the priesthood and to the work of bridging the gaps between communities and countries. “It made me want to stand for something, for people, to lead communities of faith and teach the gospel.”Padrón, now a student at SUNY Fredonia and a member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Westfield, New York, is an aspirant in the Diocese of Western New York.“I’m excited to see where [the girls] take this experience later in life,” she said.The names of the people who were massacred are listed on the wall at the memorial in El Mozote Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceA four-hour drive from San Salvador, the town of El Mozote is located in Morazán, a department, or “state,” in El Salvador’s northeast held by rebels during the latter years of the civil war. El Mozote remained neutral during the war, and its citizens were told that they’d be safe as long as they didn’t align themselves with the rebels. In the end, that’s not what happened.When the soldiers first arrived in El Mozote in 1981, explained local guide Estella Lopez Chica, they separated the men from the woman and the children, killing the men first.Soldiers raped the women and girls before killing them, and small children and infants were later found hanging in the branches of a mangrove tree, their throats slit, said Lopez.The guide’s mother survived the massacre, she said, because she was away from town selling goods at nearby market the day the soldiers arrived. The account is based on the sole survivor’s testimony.The group also visited the Chapel of Divine Providence Hospital, where Roman Catholic Archbishop Oscar A. Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“Today was really powerful, I was getting really emotional, just to know hat someone could do that to another person,” said Molly Allyn, 15, of St. James Episcopal Church in Skaneateles.Traveling together in this environment, where everything is very serious, you get to know a different side to people, she said.“In the van, we can be obnoxious sometimes. But on the first or second day after learning about the civil war for the first time, it went from talking and laughing to complete silence,” she said. “It’s hard for us to process sometimes because we can’t relate it to anything that has happened in our lives.“Being here is not like sitting in a history class.”El Mozote was upsetting and hard to handle, said Mary Sawyer, 19, of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Moravia. She will attend Onodaga Community College in Syracuse in the fall.“I have always felt safe in the U.S.,” said Sawyer. “I’m from a small town where everyone knows each other. I can’t imagine how anyone could go through that. I have nothing but sympathy for those people.”Sam Laurie, 16, a high school junior and a member of Christ Church in Manlius, participates in model United Nations, where students are assigned a country and a committee and y run a mock general assembly, discussing topics and writing and submitting resolutions. In the past, Laurie has been assigned Pakistan, Switzerland and Hungary.Laurie learned a lot about El Salvador, she said, putting into context some of what she’d learned studying post-Cold War, post-imperialist Latin America in her advanced-placement history classes. She also witnessed firsthand how devastating it can be for a country prone to earthquakes and other natural disasters, with nothing but raw materials to sell to the global market, to move from a culture of dependency on wealthier nations.In college, Laurie plans to study international relations. She said she hoped eventually to become a diplomat.“This experience has changed, opened my eyes a lot,” she said, adding that, if people really knew what was happening in the world, they would work to change it.“But either they don’t know or they don’t want to know,” said Laurie. “The world is never the same. It changes every day no matter what. What people can control is that it changes for the better or for the worse.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. She currently is based in San Salvador, El Salvador. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 22, 2013 at 10:16 pm me gusta su nota bastante seria aun cuando yo naci a mediados de los ochenta recuerdo de niño que hablaban del final de la guerra y el comienzo de una nueva era basada en la paz y la igualdad cosas que hasta hoy comienzan a ver luego de 2 decadas de un gobierno que siempre busca defender los mismos intereses de unos pocos y no de la gran mayoria… Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ El Salvador: Youth group studies brutal history in context TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (1) Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Latin America, Rector Shreveport, LA By Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 22, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

La República Dominicana: Comité de Solidaridad con las Personas Desnacionalizadas

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first_img Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Santo Domingo, 5 de Noviembre del 2013] Más de 270 personas de los distintos ámbitos sociales se constituyeron hoy  en un “Comité de Solidaridad con las Personas Desnacionalizadas” por la sentencia del Tribunal Constitucional dominicano de septiembre pasado que dispone revocar la nacionalidad a los hijos de inmigrantes ilegales que fueron inscritos en el registro civil hasta 1929.Rechazando la división de la sociedad dominicana por la siembra de odios y enconos, los voceros del comité proclamaron una disposición constructiva para unir voluntades y  buscar una solución constitucional y humana a la situación de decenas de miles de ciudadanos y ciudadanas que serían empujadas a un gueto o apartheid.La declaración constitutiva presentada en una rueda de prensa alienta “la sensibilidad expresada por el presidente Danilo Medina, quien reconoce la necesidad de encontrar una solución al grave problema que representan las personas desnacionalizadas”.Indica que la sentencia pretende una aplicación de una norma en perjuicio de miles de personas, violentando el principio universal de irretroactividad de la ley, ratificado en el artículo 110 de la Constitución vigente que reza: “La ley sólo dispone para el porvenir. No tiene efecto retroactivo sino cuando sea favorable al que esté subjúdice o cumpliendo condena. En ningún caso los poderes públicos o la ley podrán afectar la seguridad jurídica derivada de situaciones establecidas conforme a una legislación anterior”.El documento sostiene que “Para excluir a millares de ciudadanos y ciudadanas de la nacionalidad dominicana, el TC reinterpretó las constituciones dominicanas que hasta la del 2010 otorgaban la nacionalidad a todas las personas nacidas en territorio nacional, con excepción de los hijos de diplomáticos y “los que están de tránsito”, extendiendo esto último por tiempo indefinido, en contradicción con el Reglamento de Migración 279 del 12 de mayo de 1939, que limitaba la condición de tránsito a diez días.”El comité de solidaridad afirma que “Estamos frente a un grave drama humano que rebasa los límites de la inmigración y que, aún si faltare el derecho, obligaría a una solución que evite la constitución de un apartheid de cientos de miles de personas, el cual se trasmitiría indefinidamente a sus descendientes. Afecta a seres humanos cuyo vínculo fundamental es la sociedad dominicana, que no se podrían ir para ningún otro país”.Resalta “la perspectiva en que se coloca a la nación dominicana de espaldas a principios y cuestiones básicas y sensibles de la convivencia universal marcada por los movimientos migratorios, lo que nos expone a condenas internacionales ya anticipadas por la Comisión Interamericana de los Derechos Humanos y por la jurisprudencia de la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos”.Y sostiene que “Las repercusiones podrían afectar a la extensa comunidad dominicana en numerosos países, inclusive en aquellos donde nuestros nacionales luchan por regularizar su estatus de inmigrantes. Por fortuna no se conoce un solo caso donde hoy día se pretenda despojar de su nueva o doble nacionalidad a los hijos nacidos en el exterior de nuestros emigrantes indocumentados. Aunque originalmente fuimos una nación de inmigrantes, hoy día somos netamente de emigrantes y sus remesas han sido y son sostén fundamental de la estabilidad económica nacional.”Al anunciar una serie de actividades masivas con las comunidades, como conciertos y asambleas locales, y de búsqueda de consenso y voluntad en los sectores sociales influyentes, incluyendo iglesias, empresariado, universidades, facultades de derecho y grupos de juritas, los voceros del Comité sostuvieron que la solución al conflicto “está dada en la Constitución actual que reconoce la  ciudadanía a todo el que la hubiese obtenido antes de su entrada en vigencia el 26 de enero del 2010”.  El documento reconoce que esa misma Constitución excluyó de la nacionalidad a los hijos de quienes residan ilegalmente en el territorio nacional, pero también a partir de su entrada en vigencia, por lo que tras proclamar ”una patria amplia para todos los hijos e hijas de esta tierra a quienes se les reconoció la nacionalidad” formula un llamado a “concentrar la atención en solucionar los problemas migratorios poniendo el acento en limitar los flujos inmigratorios del presente en vez de una absurda persecución del pasado”.La presentación del Comité estuvo encabezada por sus promotores el obispo episcopal Julio César Holguín, el jesuita Mario Serrano, y los profesionales Carmen Amelia Cedeño, Miguel Ceara Hatton, Juan Bolívar Díaz, Pavel Isa Contreras, Wilfredo Lozano, Manuel Robles, Cristóbal Rodríguez, Ana Selman, la diputada Guadalupe Valdez y el cantautor Víctor Víctor.Entre las personalidades que suscriben la declaración constitutiva del Comité figuran los escritores residentes en el exterior Julia Alvarez, Junot Díaz, Silvio Torres Saillant y Carlos Julio Báez. Los empresarios Franklin Báez Brugal, Fernando Capellán, Georges Santoni Recio, José Yude Michelén y Mario Bergés, así como los artistas Angel Haché, Pavel Núñez y Roldán Mármol.También firman los expertos constitucionalistas Olivo Rodríguez Huerta y Nassef Perdomo Cordero, así como los juristas Francisco Alvarez Valdez, David Alvarez Martín, Emigdio Valenzuela, Carlos R. Salcedo y Andrés Astacio Polanco.Entre los intelectuales aparecen Rafael Emilio Yunén, Hugo Tolentino, Andrés L. Mateo, Avelino Stanley, Chiqui Vicioso, Angela Hernández y Manuel Matos Moquete. También los religiosos Telésforo Isaac, Luis Rosario, Abraham Apolinario, Eduardo García Tamayo y Milton Amparo.Decenas de reconocidos profesionales forman también parte del comité, entre ellos Bernardo Defilló, Jacquiline Malagón, Enmanuel Castillo, Rosario Espinal, Hamlet Hermann, Mu-Yien Sang Ben, Arismendi Díaz, Isidoro Santana, Rafael Toribio, Ada Wiscovitch, César Pérez, Cristóbal Valdez, Miriam Díaz, Luis Shecker,  Jeffrey Lizardo, Melba Barnett,  Bernardo Castellanos, Roberto Alvarez, Rosalina Perdomo, Alberto Rodríguez, Elizabeth Puig, Gustavo González, Francisco Abate, Javier Cabreja, Argelia Tejada Yanguela, Amparo Arango, Pengsien Rafael Sang Ben, Frank Báez Evertz  y Domingo Abréu.Y entre los periodistas figuran Homero Figueroa, Roberto Cavada, Miguel Guerrero, Fausto Rosario,  Brinella Fernández, Ramón Colombo, Patricia Solano, Ana Mitila Lora, Gustavo Olivo, Melvin Peña  y Edwin Ruiz. Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA La República Dominicana: Comité de Solidaridad con las Personas Desnacionalizadas Síntesis Ejecutiva, Documento Constitutivo Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (1) November 7, 2013 at 2:29 pm Agregen mi nombre a esa lista,apoyo estos humanistas contra todo acto facista racista que promueve el apartaid en nuestro pais. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Posted Nov 5, 2013 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Documento ConstitutivoRechacemos todo gueto o apartheidLlamado a la conciencia nacional, en especial a líderes políticos, religiosos y sociales, a intelectuales, profesionales, artistas, comunicadores y a todas las personas sensibles y militantes en la solidaridad del género humanoDesde el 2007 por una simple resolución administrativa de la Junta Central Electoral, sin que mediara una sentencia judicial, miles de ciudadanos y ciudadanas de padres extranjeros, particularmente haitianos, han sido privados del derecho a obtener copias de sus actas de nacimiento bajo la presunción de que obtuvieron la nacionalidad de forma irregular.De nada han valido los dictámenes de varios tribunales ante los cuales algunas de las víctimas acudieron en busca de amparo frente a una arbitrariedad que les ha dejado sus vidas en suspenso, ocasionándoles graves daños morales, sociales y económicos, al verse imposibilitados de obtener la cédula de identidad, de sacar o renovar pasaportes, de contraer matrimonio, de acceder a empleos y a  estudios técnicos y universitarios.Cuando se esperaba que el Tribunal Constitucional (TC) respondería a una solicitud de amparo de la ciudadana de origen haitiano Juliana Deguis Pierre, el resultado ha sido la ratificación de la injusticia en base a la interpretación de que no le correspondía la nacionalidad por haber sido hija de extranjeros que se encontraban en tránsito por el país, no obstante que llevan décadas residiendo aquí y que la recurrente tiene 29 años de vida y no conoce ningún otro estado.El TC juzgó a la señora Deguis sin darle oportunidad a que se defendiera, y además dictaminó en contra de todo el que se encuentre en situación similar, que según la misma sentencia podrían ser cientos de miles de personas, disponiendo  que se haga un rastreo de todo el registro civil dominicano a partir de 1929 hasta el 2007, cuando se puso en vigencia lo que se ha denominado política de desnacionalización o genocidio civil,  para “identificar e integrar en una lista documental y/o digital a todos los extranjeros inscritos en los libros-registros de nacimiento”  para luego “Consignar en una segunda lista los extranjeros que se encuentren irregularmente inscritos por carecer de las condiciones requeridas por la Constitución de la República”, para  finalmente transferirlos administrativamente “a los nuevos libros-registros de nacimientos de extranjeros.”. En síntesis que se declararía extranjeros a personas que podrían tener hasta ocho décadas de nacidas en el país, con raíces sociales y humanas insustituibles.En alta proporción, los expertos en derecho constitucional y prestigiosos juristas han coincidido en calificar la sentencia del TC como violatoria de principios fundamentales del derecho internacional, de la Constitución de la República y el código civil así como de la misma ley orgánica constitutiva de esa corte. Por igual reconocidas instituciones nacionales e internacionales han rechazado las conclusiones del dictamen considerándolas violatorias de tratados suscritos por el Estado dominicano como la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos, la Convención Americana de Derechos Humanos y la Convención sobre Derechos del Niño.Para excluir a millares de ciudadanos y ciudadanas de la nacionalidad dominicana, el TC reinterpretó las constituciones dominicanas que hasta la del 2010 otorgaban la nacionalidad a todas las personas nacidas en territorio nacional, con excepción de los hijos de diplomáticos y “los que están de tránsito”, extendiendo esto último por tiempo indefinido, en contradicción con el Reglamento de Migración 279 del 12 de mayo de 1939, que limitaba la condición de tránsito a diez días.Lo que es peor, la sentencia pretende una aplicación retroactiva de una norma en perjuicio de miles de personas, violentando el principio universal de irretroactividad de la ley, ratificado en el artículo 110 de la Constitución vigente que reza: “La ley sólo dispone para el porvenir. No tiene efecto retroactivo sino cuando sea favorable al que esté subjúdice o cumpliendo condena. En ningún caso los poderes públicos o la ley podrán afectar la seguridad jurídica derivada de situaciones establecidas conforme a una legislación anterior”.Es obvio que la Constitución del 2010 que nos rige, en su numeral 3, reitera la exclusión de la nacionalidad a los hijos de diplomáticos y personas en tránsito en el país, agregando a quienes “residan ilegalmente en territorio dominicano”, pero su numeral 2 no permite dudas al reconocer la ciudadanía a “quienes gocen de la nacionalidad dominicana antes de la entrada en vigencia de esta Constitución”.Estamos ante un despojo masivo de la nacionalidad sin precedentes en ninguna nación democrática. Los hechos similares que registra la historia han sido la antesala de algunas de sus mayores y más lacerantes injusticias. Esos ciudadanos y ciudadanas no asaltaron las oficialías civiles para inscribirse como dominicanos. Los registraron porque era la interpretación que prevalecía de la Constitución, reformada al efecto en el 2010.No escapa a nuestras consideraciones la impracticabilidad del mandato del TC de identificar a todos los hijos de extranjeros indocumentados que pudieron obtener la nacionalidad desde 1929, dado que una proporción importante de los libros de registros están deteriorados o han desaparecido y que miles de esos ciudadanos  y ciudadanas  han fallecido o han transitado al exterior con documentación dominicana. ¿Invalidaremos retrospectivamente todos sus actos civiles?Como hasta ahora, la forma más fácil de identificarlos sería por los apellidos “de origen extranjero” cuando acuden a una oficialía a solicitar copia de sus actas, lo que afecta fundamentalmente a los más jóvenes, porque los mayores, que ya tienen cédula de identidad, pocas veces necesitan el acta de nacimiento, sobre todo si son pobres.Para ejecutar la masiva exclusión se requerirían muchos años, enormes recursos y sobre todo una gran cacería nacional de personas que afectaría no sólo a los de ascendencia haitiana, sino también cocolos, chinos, árabes, judíos, norteamericanos, españoles, franceses, y de muchas otras nacionalidades. Eso sólo serviría para dividir y sembrar  odios y resentimientos en contradicción con la esencia misma del pueblo dominicano.A nadie debe escapar la perspectiva en que se coloca a la nación dominicana de espaldas a principios y cuestiones básicas y sensibles de la convivencia universal marcada por los movimientos migratorios, lo que nos expone a condenas internacionales ya anticipadas por la Comisión Interamericana de los Derechos Humanos y por la jurisprudencia de la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos.Las repercusiones podrían afectar a la extensa comunidad dominicana en numerosos países, inclusive en aquellos donde nuestros nacionales luchan por regularizar su estatus de inmigrantes. Por fortuna no se conoce un solo caso donde hoy día se pretenda despojar de su nueva o doble nacionalidad a los hijos nacidos en el exterior de nuestros emigrantes indocumentados. Aunque originalmente fuimos una nación de inmigrantes, hoy día somos netamente de emigrantes y sus remesas han sido y son sostén fundamental de la estabilidad económica nacional.Estamos frente a un grave drama humano que rebasa los límites de la inmigración y que, aún si faltare el derecho, obligaría a una solución que evite la constitución de un apartheid de cientos de miles de personas, el cual se trasmitiría indefinidamente a sus descendientes. Afecta a seres humanos cuyo vínculo fundamental es la sociedad dominicana, que no se podrían ir para ningún otro país.Alentamos la sensibilidad expresada por el presidente Danilo Medina, quien reconoce la necesidad de encontrar una solución al grave problema que representan las personas desnacionalizadas.Creemos que la solución está dada en la Constitución actual que reconoce la ciudadanía a todo el que la hubiese obtenido antes de su entrada en vigencia, el 26 de enero del 2010.Proclamamos una patria amplia para todos los hijos e hijas de esta tierra a quienes se les reconoció la nacionalidad, al tiempo que reclamamos concentrar la atención en solucionar los problemas migratorios en base a la nueva visión concertada por las entidades sociales y políticas, poniendo el acento en limitar los flujos inmigratorios del presente en vez de una absurda persecución del pasado.Por todo lo anterior y muchas otras razones que la economía de palabras nos impone, los suscriptores nos constituimos en un Comité Nacional en Solidaridad con los Desnacionalizados. En Santo Domingo, República Dominicana, a los cinco (5) días del mes de noviembre del año  dos mil trece (2013).Abril Troncoso, Ada Wiscovitch, Adelaida Oreste, Adriana Del Conte, Alanna Lockward, Alberto Rodríguez, Alcibíades Tejeda, Alejandro Moline,  Alejandro Paulino, Alexander Mundaray, Alexis Gómez Rosa, Alina Ramírez, Altagracia Balcácer, Altaír Rodríguez, Amelia Quezada, Amparo Arango, Amparo Chantada González, Amparo Custodio, Ana Mitila Lora, Ana Selman, Ana Vásquez, Andrés Astacio Polanco, Andrés L. Mateo, Ángel Haché , Ángel Hernández, Ángel Matos, Ángela Caba, Ángela Hernández, Annalisa Staffa, Ansel Patricia Sierra F, Aquiles Castro, Arévalo Cedeño, Argelia Estévez Breton, Argelia Tejada Yanguela, Arismendi Díaz Santana, Arturo Victoriano, Avelino Stanley, Ayacx Mercedes, Beatriz Ferrer, Bernardo Castellanos, Bernardo Defillo, Betsy Uribe, Betty Del Villar, Betzel Reynoso, Bianela Quezada, Brinella Fernández, Carlos Brito, Carlos Cabrera, Carlos Castro, Carlos Julio Báez Evertz, Carlos R. Salcedo, Carmen Amelia Cedeño, Carmen Figueiras, Carmen julia Gómez, Carolina Cid, Celedonio Jiménez, Cesar Mieses, Cesar Pérez, Chiqui Vicioso, Cirilo Quiñones, Clara Báez, Clara Franco, Consuelo Cruz Almanzar, Cristal Antonia Acevedo Then, Cristobal Rodriguez, Cristóbal Valdez, Damaris Lara, Daniel Dilón, Daniel Pimienta, Dario Solano, David Álvarez Martin, Delfín López, Desiree Del Rosario, Diego Martínez, Domingo Abreu, Domingo Matías, Eddy Tejeda, Eduardo García Tamayo , SJ., Eduardo J. Tejera, Edward Moreno, Edwin J. Ruiz, Ela Costa, Elisa Frías Mejía, Elisabeth Puig, Elsa Alcántara, Emigdio Valenzuela, Enmanuel Castillo, Enrique de León, Eric Mercedes, Ernesto Zabala, Esteban Reyes, Esther Abreu Van Grieke,  Euclides Nouel, Eusebio Etxarren, Faride Raful, Fátima Portorreal, Fátima Vaca Ferrer, Fausto Rosario, Felipe E Díaz, Fernando Arturo De la Rosa Ruiz, Fernando Capellán, Fernando Ureña, Floriana Piña, Francisco Abate, Francisco Álvarez Valdez, Francisco Checo, Francisco Leonardo, Frank Báez Evertz, Franklin Báez Brugal, Franklin Peralta, Franklyn J. Pimentel-Torres, Georges Santoni Recio, Gilda Solano, Gloriana Peña, Graziella Domino, Guadalupe Valdez, Guillermo Peña, Guillermo Sterling, Gustavo González Santana, Gustavo Olivo Peña, Hamlet Hermann, Hamlet Hermann, Hecmilio Galván, Hilda Mercado, Homero Figueroa, Isidoro Santana, Ivan Ogando Lora,  J. Santana, Jacqueline Malagón, Jacqueline Zorrilla Martínez, Jaime José Malla Frankenberg, Janio Lora, Hugo Tolentino Dipp, Ian Victor, Javier Cabreja, Jefrey Lizardo, Jhonatan Liriano, Joaquín Aracena, Johnny De La Cruz, José Aníbal  David, José Bourget, José Carlos Nazario, José Francisco Rosario, Jose Yude Michelen, Jovanny  Espino, Juan Alberto Báez Peguero, Juan Bolivar Diaz, Juan Carlos Hauszler, Juan Dionicio Rodríguez Restituyo, Juan Morel, Juan Teófilo Murath Javier, Juan Thomas Rodríguez Amador, Julia Álvarez, Julio Cesar Holguín Khoury, Julio César Mejía, Julio César Mejía Santana, Julio Disla, Julio Michelen, Junot Díaz, Justo Santiago, Kenny Cabrera, Kirsis Mota, Laura Jiménez, Laura Rojas, Leibi NG, Leticia Ayuso, Lizzie Sánchez, Lliben Chea Ariza, Lorena Espinoza, Lourdes Contreras, Luis Barrios, Luis Cruz, Luis Emilio Almonte, Luis Enrique Geraldo Matos, Luis Scheker, Lusitania Martínez, Magaly Pineda, Magda Pepén,, Manuel Martin Cuenca, Manuel Matos Moquete, Manuel Robles, Mar García Domínguez, Margarita Cordero, Margarita Dolores Sánchez, Marel Alemany, María Antonia Matos Pérez, María del Mar Mella,  María Fernanda López, María I. Reinat Pumarejo, María Teresa Cabrera, María Teresa cabrera, Mario Bergés. Martha Rosario,  Max Puig, Melba Barnett, Melba Neris Guzman , Melvin Peña, Menegildo de la Rosa, Miguel Ángel Hernández, Miguel Ángel Morillo L. , Miguel Ceara, ,Miguel Guerrero, Miguel Solano, Miguelina Kelly, Milagros Ricourt, Mildred Mata,  Milossis Liriano, Milton Tejada, Miriam Díaz Santana, Mu-Yien Altagracia Sang Ben, Nassef Perdomo Cordero. Patricia Pereyra, Natalia Mármol, Nelson Ramirez, Nelson Ricart Guerrero, Nicolle Núñez Miranda, Noemí Araujo Martínez, Olaya Dotel, Olga Luciano López, Olivio Luzón Ramírez, Olivo Rodríguez Huerta, Oscar Radhames Amargos Pérez, Pablo Bonnelly, Pablo Rosario, Padre Abrahám Apolinario, Padre Luis Rosario, Patricia Báez , Patricia Moliné, Patricia Solano, Paula Disla, Pavel Isa Contreras, Pedro Catrain, Pedro Juan del Rosario, Pengsien Sang Ben, Pericles Enrique Mejía Molina, Quisqueya Lora H., Rafael (Fafa) Taveras, Rafael Darío del Rosario Curiel, Rafael Elías, Rafael Emilio Yunén, Rafael González Mármol, Rafael Taveras Pineda, Rafael Toribio, Ramón Colombo, Ramon Sosa, Raquel Robla Carretero, Raúl Bartolomé, Reina Rosario, Rev. Milton Amparo, Rev. Telésforo Isaac, Ricardo González, Roberto Álvarez, Roberto Cavada, Roberto Díaz Santana, Roland Jeudy, Roldan Mármol, Rosa Vazquez, Rosalía Sosa Pérez, Rosalina Perdomo, Rosanna Marzán, Rosario Espinal, Sergia Galván Ortega, Silvia Denisse Pichardo Rodriguez, Silvio Torres Saillant, Sixto Gabin, Sonia Besonias, Sonia Nereyda Medina, Sonia Vargas, Sor Servía Tulia García Martínez, Tahira Vargas, Tarasí Rosado, Tony Pichardo, Víctor Víctor, Vielka  Asilis, Violeta Saint Hilaire, Wellington Arnaud, Wilfredo Lozano, William Hernández, Wilson Castillo, Zobeyda Apólito, Zobeyda Ferreras. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Jaime Soto says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

Episcopal Church of Cuba adopts three-year strategic plan

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first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Episcopal Church of Cuba held its annual General Synod in Havana Feb. 21-23. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Havana, Cuba] The Episcopal Church of Cuba has a clear vision moving into its next triennium: to be a church united in diversity, celebration, evangelism, teaching, serving and sharing the love of God.Arriving at that vision has been “a very rich experience,” yet at times “somewhat difficult,” said Bishop Griselda Delgado Del Carpio, during a post-General Synod interview with Episcopal News Service on Feb. 23.For its 2014-16 strategic plan, the church finds inspiration from Paul’s letter to the Ephesians, specifically Chapter 4, Verses 15-16: “But speaking the truth in love, we must grow up in every way into him who is the head, into Christ, from whom the whole body, joined and knit together by every ligament with which it is equipped, as each part is working properly, promotes the body’s growth in building itself up in love.”At the close of the last three years, Delgado’s first full triennium serving as bishop, a clearer vision for the church began to develop, with evangelism taking center stage in the church’s mission, she said.“From there we could visualize a concrete plan that we have to work from,” she added.The three-year plan’s objectives include:strengthening the continued growth of the pastoral ministry of laity and clergy;increasing financial sustainability through stewardship, project management and the exploration of other country sources;providing through its own leadership capacity the space for biblical and theological reflection at the local and diocesan level focused on values, ethics, history of the church, and spirituality and family;reinforcing the visibility of the work of the church, both inside and outside;strengthening management capacity and organization, including planning, control, evaluation and systematization;promoting pastoral programs and accompaniment for marginalized people and groups, those who are vulnerable, the aged, those who suffer from addictions or are HIV positive; andachieving better communication across the church.“Thanks to God we are involving young people in the church,” she said. “We believe that they are not only the future, but the present.” Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Anglican Communion Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing March 1, 2014 at 11:51 am I agree with you, Father Al.La Obispa Griselda is a gift from God to Cuba and a blessing for us in America as she diligently but gracefully works to bring our peoples together into the dialogue of Christ’s Love. Congratulations on a successful third Synod! Godspeed with a flourishing future for the Church in Cuba. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church of Cuba adopts three-year strategic plan February 28, 2014 at 7:23 pm Congratulations to Bishop Griselda and the people she serves. She is wonderful! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Griselda Delgado Del Carpio poses with children following the General Synod’s closing Eucharist. The church in Cuba’s three-year plan prioritizes the formation of children. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIt’s for that reason, she added, that the plan focuses on the formation of young people, children and adolescents and also those on the path toward priesthood who will inherit big responsibilities.“I continue to be amazed at the tenacity and missional heart of the Episcopal Church in Cuba,” said Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in an e-mail to ENS.“They are a great example to Episcopal Church congregations of what Asset Based Community Development looks like — valuing all the gifts God has provided in this place, listening to the needs of the wider community, and collaborating for mission and ministry.  Bishop Griselda is leading transformative ministry in Cuba — I urge you to go and see if you are able, develop a diocesan or parish partnership, and learn more.”The Episcopal Church of Cuba’s annual General Synod, held Feb. 21-23 at Trinity Cathedral in Havana, was attended by Episcopalians and Anglicans from the United States and Canada, including Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.During his introduction to convention, Hiltz described Delgado as “a great ambassador for Cuba, putting the church in Cuba on the map of the Anglican Communion in very important ways.”Delgado was installed in November 2010, replacing Bishop Miguel Tamayo of the Anglican Church of Uruguay who served the church as an interim bishop for six years, splitting his time between Montevideo and Havana.Dominican Republic Bishop Julio César Holguín preached during the closing Eucharist of the Episcopal Church of Cuba’s General Assembly. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFollowing Delgado’s election, Dominican Republic Bishop Julio César Holguín became her mentor for three years, a relationship that continues informally today. Holguín led a small delegation, including members of companion dioceses, to Cuba Feb. 18-25, to attend General Synod.The Diocese of the Dominican Republic has some 15 U.S.-based companion diocese relationships, and itself serves as a companion to the church in Cuba, though in a more informal, “sentimental” way as an expression of solidarity, said Holguín.But the relationship also has taken on a practical nature, for example in 2009 the Episcopal Church’s General Convention initiated $23 million in budget cuts necessitated by declining revenue, which meant a decrease in grants to Province IX dioceses and the church’s covenant partners, including Cuba.Following that action, the clergy in the Diocese of the Dominican Republic committed to giving 1 percent of their salaries, which amounts to about $3,000 total, to be shared by the clergy in Cuba, said Holguín, adding that the monthly salary for clergy might be $7 or $8.“We were in a better position than anyone to support the church in Cuba,” he said.The Episcopal Church’s triennial budget allocates $106,000 to the church in Cuba.Dominican Republic Bishop Julio César Holguín and Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, talk during lunchtime at the Episcopal Church of Cuba’s General Synod. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceLike the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, the Anglican Church of Canada has had a longstanding relationship with the Episcopal Church of Cuba, said Hiltz.The Episcopal Church of Cuba is an autonomous diocese of the Anglican Communion under the authority of the Metropolitan Council of Cuba. The council is chaired by Hiltz and includes Jefferts Schori and Archbishop of the West Indies John Holder. The council has overseen the church in Cuba since it separated from the U.S.-based Episcopal Church in 1967.In the six- and-a half years that Hiltz has served on the council, he said, despite the continued hardship, he’s sees a lot of hope in the church, as well as a push toward leadership development. Having a full-time bishop has helped, he added.“The church here in Cuba is not an institution, but a movement, a gospel movement,” said Hiltz.The Sunday prior to the convention, Feb. 16, Hiltz and other visitors from the Anglican Church of Canada visited a house church in Luyano, a poor section of Havana, where the packed congregation celebrated Valentine’s Day by exchanging practical gifts of soap and toothpaste, two necessities that can be difficult to come by in Cuba.Following the Eucharist, the congregation led the group to the building site of their church, which after being destroyed 30 years earlier by a hurricane is being readied for an Easter Sunday consecration.Rather than just build a place of worship, however, Hiltz said, the temple includes medical and elder-care clinics and a community center.“You get the sense that the church is really in the community, there for the sake of the community,” said Hiltz. “Seeing it on the ground enriches my understanding and helps the way we uphold them in prayer.”In offering prayer, context makes a difference, he added.Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio and Diocese of Niagara Bishop Michael Bird talk following a business session. Cuba and Niagara recently renewed their companion diocese relationship. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIn the Anglican Church of Canada’s Diocese of Niagara, the 91 parishes pray weekly for the churches in Cuba, said Bishop Michael Bird, when introduced to the synod.The Canadian church provides support for the Cuban church through program support, clergy and seminary faculty stipends and through diocesan companion relationships.The Diocese of Niagara, for example, recently renewed its decade-long companion diocese relationship with the church in Cuba for another five years.“Cuba is kind of a special diocese in the Anglican Communion, and our partnership is a way of expressing solidarity and friendship; a grassroots expression of that,” said the Rev. Bill Mous, the diocese’s director of justice, community and global ministries.The Episcopal Church of Cuba traces its origins back to an Anglican presence beginning in 1901. Today there are some 46 congregations and missions serving 10,000 members and the wider communities. During the 1960s, Fidel Castro’s government began cracking down on religion, jailing religious leaders and believers, and it wasn’t until the Pope John Paul II’s 1998 visit to Cuba, the first ever visit by a Roman Catholic pope to the island, that the government began a move back toward tolerance of religion.The Cuban Revolution, led by Castro, began in 1953 and lasted until President Fulgencio Batista was forced from power in 1959. Batista’s anti-communist, authoritarian government was replaced with a socialist state, which in 1965 aligned itself with the communist party. In 2008 Raul Castro replaced as president his ailing brother.Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, Dominican Republic Bishop Julio César Holguín and Diocese of Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley in procession for the closing Eucharist. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceWhat struck Diocese of Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley most was the uniquely Cuban way of being Anglican.“What was most striking to me was the sense of how they strategically contextualize the church by very carefully honoring their Cuban culture and melding that with Anglicanism,” he said, adding that it’s clear from the strategic plan that not only the leadership of the bishop is important, but also that of the clergy and the laity.He also was impressed, he said, with the church’s focus on justice issues and helping the “least of theseBishop Miguel Tamayo Zaldívar, former interim bishop of Cuba, and Bishop Ulises Aguero, bishop emeritus of Cuba, during the procession of the closing Eucharist. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe Cuban church’s experience with socialism and its understanding that everyone must work together in solidarity serves as a good model for the church in North and Latin America, said Ousley.Overlapping with the start of the church’s General Synod, a diverse Anglican-Episcopal mission group – including people from the United States, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, El Salvador – visited St. Francisco de Assisi Church in Cárdenas, in Matanzas Province, about a two hours’ drive east of Havana. The group was led by the Rev. Canon Juan Andrés Quevedo, rector of the Church of the Redeemer in Astoria, Queens, and an archdeacon in the Diocese of Long Island.It was the first time in 13 years that Quevedo, who was born in the city of Matanzas and who attended the local evangelical seminary before studying at Trinity College in Toronto, Canada, had been back in Cuba.In the grass alongside St. Francisco de Assisi cinderblocks were neatly arranged in rows, almost like headstones in a cemetery, only they were there to keep the church’s newly sanded and stained pews from touching the grass.The mission group needed a service project to be completed within a week so, along with the Rev. Aurelio de la Paz Cot, they decided it would be best to refinish the pews, and to passersby the neatly arranged cinderblocks and the drying pews looked curious.“For us it was an evangelism event,” said de la Paz, who was a seminary mate of Quevedo’s in Matanza, adding that the people nearby, curious about the work and the workers, would stop by and ask, “Who are these people?”And more than that, for de la Paz it was a “marvelous experience” and it meant a lot for him and his congregation that people would use their vacation time and their personal resources to come to Cuba, to learn about its culture and its people and share something of themselves, with people who are otherwise somewhat isolated.For those who traveled to the island, the experience was at the same time one of both joy and pain, said Quevedo, with many comparing their own country’s experience with totalitarian regimes and high levels of poverty.“They have seen a side of poverty not familiar to them,” he said, during a visit to an organic farm near Cádenas run by the Christian Center for Reflection and Dialogue.“Our poor are educated and that makes them self-aware of how to live better, where in their countries the poor have been beaten into despair.”That self-awareness also can be seen in the way the church operates in Cuba.“It’s a very cultural church, rooted in the history of Cuba,” said Carlos Austin, a second-year seminarian from the Episcopal Church of Panama.The church has strong leadership, he said, but one of its most defining characteristics is its youth presence.“Young people really get involved,” said Austin. “It’s not like in our countries; maybe they aren’t as organized but they have the manpower.”As a seminarian at Evangelical Theological Seminary in Matanzas, Austin spends his weekends serving Cuatro Esquinas, a church in Los Arabos, a community some 65 miles away.“They are an example of what a church should do community-wise,” said Austin, adding that the church serves as a community center and dispenses medicines and purified water. “The priest and the leadership are seen as helpers; where I come from we [the church] have to learn more about the community.“Many times it looks like we are focused on inward evangelism; here they don’t focus on evangelism, they focus on mission and the evangelism will follow.”It was the Rt. Rev. Julio Murray, bishop of Panama, who decided Austin would attend seminary in Cuba, rather than in Brazil, Austin’s other alternative. He’s one of 17 resident seminarians; the school has 500 distance-learning students across Cuba.The bishop wanted Austin to study theology in the Latin-American context, and for Austin, at least in the beginning, it was difficult because everyday life in Cuba requires fortitude.Public transportation in Cuba is limited and it can take hours to cover short distances; basic goods like toilet paper, soap and toothpaste can be difficult to come by, regardless of whether you have the money or not to buy them; salaries are low, with doctors earning less than $20 a month.If not for the kindness of church members, Austin said, he would have left.“That’s what’s made the difference for me here, the church and the people took me in,” he said.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. She traveled to Cuba Feb. 18-25 with a delegation led by Dominican Republic Bishop Julio César Holguín.  Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Fr. Al Walls says: Comments (3) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ October 15, 2014 at 9:27 pm I traveled to Cuba with the Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida a few years ago and attended a sunday service at the Cathedral. I still remember the a cappella allelujia that was sung during the peace. Can someone please share the music as we would like to replicate it at some point with our choir. It was just amazing!What an experience!Thank you!Diane Kimes Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Lynette WilsonPosted Feb 28, 2014 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Diane Balogh Kimes says: Rector Tampa, FL Comments are closed. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Marilyn Peterson says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

United Society reclaims familiar USPG name

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first_img Comments (2) Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Rector Bath, NC By Gavin DrakePosted Jul 22, 2016 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 22, 2016 at 4:41 pm At the risk of sounding like an aging curmudgeon, they should never have tried Us in the first place. I was teaching in Botswana at the time of the change, and folks just rolled their eyes. The USPG has a wonderful heritage and progressive theological vision, and the name USPG worked to reflect both. Rephrasing USPG is a useful change, however. Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican mission agency United Society is to resume using the more familiar name USPG by which it was known between 1956 and 2012. But the agency is not returning to its former full name of United Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. The new full name will be the United Society Partners in the Gospel.The agency has played a long and important role in the history of international Christian missionary activity and has played a significant part in the spread of Anglicanism across the globe.The agency was formed by Royal Charter in 1701 as the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (SPG). In 1965 the agency merged with the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa to form the United Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (USPG).It adopted its present name – United Society – in 2012 “with a reinvigorated desire to participate in God’s global mission”; but many people found the abbreviated form of their name – Us – confusing on a global stage where it ran the risk of confusion with the United States.“During 2015, we undertook some research to discover how our new brand had been received,” the agency’s chief executive, Janette O’Neill, said. “We learned that, while our partners in Britain and Ireland and around the world greatly appreciated the energy, values and practical work embodied in the Us brand, many remained saddened that we were no longer referring to the gospel in our name.“As well as reintroducing ‘gospel’ into our name, the new meaning of USPG emphasizes our focus on working in partnership with the world church, while also encouraging the Anglican Churches of Britain and Ireland to participate more deeply in that partnership.”The renewed USPG name will be launched alongside a new logo and branding at the Greenbelt Christian arts festival at the end of August. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID July 22, 2016 at 10:13 pm in 2001, at the 300th Anniversary of the (U)SPG founding the board of governors invited 40 laity, bishops, priest, deacons from around the Anglican Communion to spend a month in Ireland and England discussing the meaning of mission for today and the future. It was a significant opportunity to hear voices throughout the Communion and to come to a clear, simple statement: Mission is no longer based on the assumption that missionaries bring something to a people that they do not have. Mission is about gathering and discovering together what God is calling us to do as “partners” in this place and time. I was honored to represent North America (TEC and Church of Canada – an area no longer served by the USPG). More people need to know about the incredible work and theological orientation the USPG offers to the whole Church Leon Spencer says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Jerry Drino says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC United Society reclaims familiar USPG namelast_img read more

Southern African Anglicans seek fossil fuel-free investment portfolios

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first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Anglican Communion News Service] The Provincial Synod of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa (ACSA) has agreed in principle to divest from fossil fuels. But they face a problem with putting this into practice because there are currently no fossil fuel-free portfolios available in South Africa’s financial markets. The motion approved by the synod empowers ACSA to negotiate with financial institutions to create investment portfolios that exclude fossil fuels. If successful, the church could pave the way for a new ethical investment sector in the country.Full article. Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Fossil Fuel Divestment Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York by Gavin DrakePosted Sep 30, 2016 Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Southern African Anglicans seek fossil fuel-free investment portfolios The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Environment & Climate Change, Rector Collierville, TN Anglican Communion, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Solicitan opiniones para el programa del Ministerio de los Negros…

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first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Solicitan opiniones para el programa del Ministerio de los Negros de la Iglesia Episcopal Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted May 3, 2017 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [1 de mayo de 2017] El comité de búsqueda del misionero para el Ministerio de los Negros de la Iglesia Episcopal solicita el aporte de opiniones mientras discierne el camino a seguir para este importante ministerio.El comité de búsqueda solicita de episcopales afroamericanos, así como de clérigos que atienden congregaciones que son histórica o predominantemente negras, y a otros con experiencia y pasión por el ministerio de los negros y con los negros que respondan a una encuesta que se encuentra aquí. Las respuestas se utilizarán para formular un enfoque para la oficina y para el cargo [que se espera cubrir].La encuesta cerrará el viernes 5 de mayo.Para más información al respecto, diríjase Angeline Cabanban en acabanban@episcopalchurch.org. Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more