The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Finds New London Home & Plans Broadway Transfer

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first_img The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time features design by Bunny Christie, with lighting design by Paule Constable, video design by Finn Ross, movement by Scott Graham and Steven Hoggett, music by Adrian Sutton and sound design by Ian Dickinson. The winner of seven Olivier Awards, the National Theatre’s production of Simon Stephens’ new play will make its Broadway debut at the Barrymore Theatre in the fall of 2014. Casting for the Great White Way incarnation will begin shortly. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is heading across the pond but first it will resume its West End run! Directed by Marianne Elliot, the current West End version of the show will not be returning to the Apollo Theatre, as previously announced, where part of the venue’s ceiling collapsed on the audience December 19 during a performance of the production. Instead it is set to start performances at the Gielgud Theatre beginning June 24. Opening night is scheduled for July 8.  Adapted from Mark Haddon’s novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time follows teenager Christopher who is exceptional at math while ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. When he falls under suspicion of killing Mrs. Shears’ dog Wellington, he records each fact about the event in the book he is writing to solve the mystery of the murder. But his detective work, forbidden by his father, takes him on a journey that upturns his world. View Commentslast_img read more

Weekend Poll: What Is Your Favorite Oscar-Winning Disney Song of All Time?

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first_img Idina Menzel View Comments Star Filescenter_img Oscar nominations have officially been announced, and as expected, “Let It Go” from Disney’s hit Frozen made the short list for best original song! The tune, written by Robert Lopez (EGOT, EGOT!) and Kristen Anderson-Lopez, has been on constant rotation on our iPods all month long. While we were busy hoping that Tony winner Idina Menzel gets to belt out her big number from the animated winter blockbuster, we started thinking about other nominated Disney tunes we love. The big-time studio boasts an impressive roster of over 30 nods for original song, from Bedknobs and Broomsticks and Bambi to The Princess and the Frog and Tangled. If Frozen grabs the top prize on March 2, it will become the 13th tune to take home the gold. The winners are a good-looking bunch, including songs from Mary Poppins, The Little Mermaid and The Muppets, to name a few. Which begs the question: From under the sea to way up high on a magic carpet ride, which Oscar-winning Disney song is your favorite? Cast your vote below!last_img read more

John Rando May Direct B’way-Aimed King Kong Musical

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first_img Tony winner Rando is currently directing a workshop of The Honeymooners, which will open at Goodspeed next September. King Kong features a score by Marius de Vries, along with revamped 1930s Broadway songs and additional numbers from artists like Sarah McLachlan, Robert Del Naja, Justice, Guy Garvey and The Avalanches. King Kong still has his sights set on the Great White Way! According to the New York Times, On the Town director John Rando is in talks to helm the Broadway-aimed mega-musical monster thriller. The 2013 Australian production of King Kong was helmed by Daniel Kramer. Marsha Norman (The Bridges of Madison County) has recently been brought in to write the book, replacing Craig Lucas. Set against the backdrop of bustling New York City in the 1930s, the show tells the story of the infamous ape and his encounter with aspiring actress Ann Darrow, megalomaniac filmmaker Carl Denham, stubborn first mate Jack Driscoll and the people of NYC. View Commentslast_img read more

Closing Time! Don’t Miss These Eight Fabulous Broadway Shows

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first_img Pippin Closing January 4 at the Music Box Theatre There are only a few more weeks of magic to do, so make some time to see the acrobats and contortionists of this circus-inspired, Tony-winning musical revival. Join young prince Pippin as he goes on his dangerous journey, encouraged by a mysterious group of performers led by a Leading Player. Throwing swords, unicycles, a flying trapeze and Stephen Schwartz tunes: need we say more? Click for tickets! Once Closing January 4 at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre Sigh–the lights are coming on in Broadway’s favorite music-filled Irish pub. This infectious, romantic, Tony-winning musical stars some of the finest actor-musicians on Broadway, so come for the stunning music (including Oscar-winning “Falling Slowly”), but stay for the bittersweet love story. You don’t have to go home, but you can’t stay here (even though we know you want to!). Click for tickets! The Real Thing Closing January 4 at the American Airlines Theatre Let us lay this one out for you: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Ewan McGregor and Cynthia Nixon are burning up a Broadway stage right now, together, in a play by Tom Stoppard. If you haven’t seen it yet, what are you waiting for? This A-list love triangle is wrapping up its limited engagement in just a few weeks, so break out that holiday check from Grammy and get real. Click for tickets! Motown the Musical Closing January 18 at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre Did you know that time travel has been invented, and for only the cost of a Broadway ticket? Head down to Motown the Musical and go back to the 1960s, when music visionary Berry Gordy changed the course of cultural history. Gordy launched the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye and so many more. Click for tickets! Rock of Ages Closing January 18 at the Helen Hayes Theatre Get out those lighters—it’s time for the hardest rockin’ show on Broadway to play its last power ballad. Head back to the Sunset Strip one last time, into a club where long-haired rockers rule, ’80s hits never stop and Lycra outfits are always in full force. We may have to say goodbye, but we will never, ever stop believing. Click for tickets! This Is Our Youth Closing January 4 at the Cort Theatre Even though we knew our time with this limited engagement was well, limited, it’s always a heartbreaker to see a good thing come to an end (much like youth, are we right?). But don’t worry, you still have time to catch this incredible trio of Broadway newcomers—Michael Cera, Kieran Culkin and Tavi Gevinson—as a trio of spoiled, angsty New York teens adrift in the 1980s. Click for tickets!center_img Cinderella Closing January 3 at the Broadway Theatre Is it almost midnight? Because this ball is coming to an end. Rodgers and Hammerstein’s take on the classic fairy tale has been delighting audiences for over 750 performances, and everyone’s favorite tale of glass slippers, wicked stepmothers and happily-ever-afters will close out with stage and screen star Keke Palmer as Ella, and Real Housewives’ Nene Leakes as Madame. Click for tickets! January may be all about “out with the old, in with the new,” but we’re still seriously sad to see a wonderful bunch of Broadway shows go! You only have a few more weeks to catch Cinderella, Pippin, Side Show, Once, This is Our Youth, The Real Thing, Motown and Rock of Ages. Get your tickets before these shows say goodbye to the Great White Way for good! Side Show Closing January 4 at the St. James Theatre We were going to make an “I Will Never Leave You” joke but let’s be real, we’re just too broken up about this brilliant reimagined revival closing to make it work. Erin Davie and Emily Padgett are blowing the roof off the St. James Theatre as conjoined twins Violet and Daisy Hilton, searching for love (and loving one another) as they rise from side show attractions to stars…it makes us well up just thinking about it. Click for tickets! View Commentslast_img read more

Valerie Harper Collapses Backstage During Performance

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first_imgTony nominee and Emmy winner Valerie Harper fell unconscious backstage during the evening performance of Nice Work If You Can Get It at Maine’s Ogunquit Playhouse on July 29. The fire department reportedly received an emergency call at 8:56 PM for a 75-year-old female. Deadline reports that Harper was discharged from hospital the morning of July 30.Harper has suffered from serious health problems in recent years. Diagnosed with lung cancer in 2009, in March 2013 she received the news that she had terminal brain cancer.Best known for playing Rhoda Morgenstern Gerard on The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Rhoda, Harper appeared on Dancing With the Stars in fall 2013. A Tony nominee for the 2010 Broadway run of Looped, her other Great White Way credits include Take Me Along, Wildcat, Subways Are For Sleeping, Something Different, Paul Sills’ Story Theatre, Ovid’s Metamorphoses and The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife. View Commentslast_img read more

Tix Now Available for 2 Across, Starring Andrea McArdle & Kip Gilman

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first_img 2 Across Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 7, 2016 Tickets are now on sale to see Annie star Andrea McArdle and Kip Gilman attempt to find a solution in 2 Across. Directed by Evelyn Rudie, the new comedy is penned by Jerry Mayer and will begin previews on November 14 at St. Luke’s Theatre.Two strangers, a psychologist (McArdle) and an unemployed ad man (Gilman) find themselves alone on a San Francisco commuter train at 4 a.m., each doing their New York Times crossword puzzles. But before their crosswords are solved, they find that they may have solved the puzzles of their own lives.The open-ended engagement is scheduled to officially open off-Broadway on December 9. View Commentslast_img read more

Holiday Inn, Hairspray Live! & More to Perform at Macy’s Parade

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first_imgThe cast of ‘Holiday Inn'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Halloween is over and it’s time to come off of that sugar high and start thinking turkey and a parade of early morning Broadway performances. The 90th annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will kick off the holiday season later this month, and as always, it promises to offer appearances from Broadway’s best.Among those performing as part of the parade are the casts of Holiday Inn, the Broadway revival of Cats, NBC’s forthcoming Hairspray Live! and—as is the case every year—the Radio City Rockettes, who begin performances in the Christmas Spectacular at Radio City Music Hall on November 11. More performances from Broadway productions will be announced at a later date.Additional participants in this year’s parade include Hamilton Tony nominee Christopher Jackson, Tony Bennett, Daya, Sandra Lee, Sarah McLachlan, Regina Spektor and the cast of Sesame Street.The 90th annual event, hosted by The Today Show’s Matt Lauer, Savannah Guthrie and Al Roker, will be broadcast on NBC on November 24. View Commentslast_img read more

Pre-Broadway Dates Set for Frozen

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first_img‘Frozen'(Photo: Walt Disney Pictures) Show Closed This production ended its run on March 11, 2020 View Comments Ready to let it go, Denver? We now have the dates for the Colorado world premiere of the Broadway-bound Frozen. Disney Theatricals’ out-of-town tryout will take place from August 17, 2017 through October 1 at the Buell Theatre. Directed by Michael Grandage and designed by Christopher Oram, the new musical based on Disney’s Oscar-winning musical is scheduled to bow on the Great White Way in spring 2018 at the St. James Theatre (which will have a new back wall).Frozen follows two royal sisters, Elsa and Anna, whose relationship is put to the test when Elsa’s magical ice powers are unleashed during a power anthem that you’re still singing under your breath. Also in the mix are a strapping iceman, his reindeer, a fast-talking snowman and a too-good-to-be-true prince. We probably didn’t need to explain that to you.The tuner will feature music and lyrics by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, the creators of the film score, and a book by Jennifer Lee, the film’s screenwriter and director (with Chris Buck). Frozen won 2014 Oscars for Best Song (“Let It Go”) and Best Animated Feature.center_img Frozen Related Showslast_img read more

Dig, Plant Perennials

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first_imgAfter watering, cover the bed with 3 inches of pine straw to reduce erosion and raincompaction and to keep the soil cool. This will also prevent early warmup and prematuregrowth. There are several reasons to relocate or at least divide and replant perennials. The mainreason is that many, if not most, perennials grow into large clumps or colonies.Competition for nutrients, water and root space tends to reduce the vigor of the entiregroup. Annual beds, dug every spring, tend to have good porosity and air movement in the soil.Perennial beds, though, are usually left alone and need attention about every three years. Pulling the clumps apart gently, with increasing force, will give you an idea if they comeapart naturally or if you will need a hand pruner to cut connecting roots. My philosophy isthat the fewer roots you cut, rip or tear, the less likely disease will get a foothold. There is another reason replanting perennials is a good idea. Whether you live onpiedmont clay or sandy soils, rainfall, garden foot traffic and gravity slowly compact thesoils. You can use a shovel to divide really tough perennials such as red hot poker, day lily,phlox and swamp sunflower. My experience with perennials, however, leads me to suggestyou divide plants such as hosta, iris, coneflower, shasta daisy and other more fragile,clump-forming perennials by hand. By allowing the plant to reestablish its root system during October, November andDecember, perennials are then well-prepared to endure our winters. A well-establishedroot system will support rapid growth and optimal flowering the following spring. Your perennial bed soil may look mounded by 4-5 inches when you finish. This is a goodsign you have done a good job. Rake the soil evenly into a smooth, slightly sloped mound. Be sure to add 10-10-10 or a similar fertilizer in late spring when the new plants startgrowing. Remember, too, to check the moisture in the newly dug bed. If we have a dryspell in October, you may need to water. Before you do anything, take a soil test to the county Extension Service office. When youget back the lab’s recommendations for amendment and nutrition, then start digging. I like to let fleshy roots, tubers and corms dry out for a day before transplanting. I replantand water-in soft fibrous roots as soon as the bed is prepared. Be sure to pile up dividedperennials out of direct sunlight. Plant your perennials in the soft soil. Do all you can to avoid compact the soil with yourknees and feet. I do this with a 3-inch-thick pile of newspapers to kneel on. Or I use apiece of plywood as a plank. Once the planting is done, irrigate the entire bed with a sprinkler for two to three hours.The bed will settle some. Don’t worry. The bumpy look will vanish by March. Dig up the clump at the edge of the dense root system, knock off the soil carefully andthen feel through the root system for natural clusters or points of separation. Eachperennial is different, but with a little feeling around, it’s usually easy to do. Preparing the bed is simple. Add the recommended amendment, then till or dig to at least12 inches deep. Add only a very little nitrogen to the soil so as not to push new growtheasily killed by frost. Irises, hostas, phlox, liatrises and shasta daisies, for example, will remain vigorous ifdivided about every three years. The next few weeks will be the ideal time to plant new perennials or divide and relocateestablished perennials in Georgia.last_img read more

Prevent “Wet Feet”

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first_img Most root disorders can be prevented by providing good soil drainage. Follow these simple tips to keep your plants healthy and beautiful well beyond those first six months. C. Ness, UGA CAES If the crown or major roots are affected by root rots, the entire plant can wilt and die rapidly. If only the small “feeder” roots are affected, the plant may decline slowly and just look sickly and unproductive. Sick or damaged roots may be present only on part of a plant’s root system, resulting in a one-sided appearance of yellow, stunted leaves. An ounce of prevention PREVENTING “WET FEET” IS EASIER THAN TREATING IT Yellowing plants may not need nitrogen, but less water. Provide good drainage for your plants by building raised beds that allow water to drain quickly. center_img ÿGood planning in the design of beds and lawn areas can prevent surface drainage problems. Slope beds and lawns so water runs away from the house. ÿLow areas sometimes cause problems because they can’t easily be graded to provide for adequate surface drainage. In such cases, you may need to construct drainage channels or French drains. ÿRemember to take into account water coming off of roofs as well. Take care that gutter downspouts drain away from plants and don’t pool water. ÿProvide internal drainage by using raised beds (particularly for annuals and tender perennials). ÿAmending planting beds with 3 to 5 inches of a good topsoil or compost will help improve drainage. Using less organic matter than this won’t provide enough soil structure change to make a difference. ÿDon’t place soil amendments directly in the planting hole. When you use potted plants, till or spade the amendments into the entire bed. Dig single planting holes at least twice the width of the root ball. Make the sides of the hole rough and jagged. Check drainage conditions first by filling the hole with water. If water drains in 24 hours, you can assume there is enough drainage. If water stands in the hole, take corrective measures or use only plants tolerant of poorly drained sites. ÿWhen planting, never place a plant deeper than the top of the root ball. Remember that the soilÿ may settle some if you dig too deep and have to backfill. ÿFinally, avoid overwatering. Most plants need about 1 inch of water per week. Any more than this may cause root problems. Water plants near the drip line of their foliage. Many times we get excited about planting new shrubs and flowers in the landscape. Webuyÿ the plants, dig the hole, drop them in and sit back and admire their beauty. Butsix months later they sometimes turn a disappointing shade of yellow.Problem may not be what you think Many folks then throw out some fertilizer, thinking the plants need nitrogen. In reality, these plants may very well be suffering from a problem common in Georgia soils, called “wet feet.” ÿWet feet is the name given to a list of diseases and problems associated with poor drainage. Our heavy clay soils tend to hold moisture well, and this often causes the roots of a plant to rot. ÿlast_img read more