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Alexander Hamilton Society provides opportunity for debate on campus

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first_imgThe University’s chapter of the Alexander Hamilton Society (AHS) is hosting its first event on campus this week — a debate about the United States’ policy regarding North Korea, rather than a musical performance.Sophomore president of AHS Marea Hurson said she started a Notre Dame chapter of the non-partisan national debate society this year in an attempt to encourage campus engagement with national and foreign policy.“You get a lot more out of it, no matter what side you’re on, if you can hear both sides,” Hurson said. “Because then you realize why you believe what you do, or maybe you get a new perspective shown to you. So we’re excited to be able to bring debate to campus.”Sophomore Annalie Nagel, co-vice president of AHS, said the debate format of the group’s events allows people to directly respond to each other in the moment.“It’s a very unique setting, as opposed to all the lectures that are going on this week, because you get two ideas, they’re presented in a — not contentious, but an adversary format, and they have to directly disagree with each other,” she said. “That fray and conflict adds a lot of interest, and hopefully we’ll get a lot of questions from both sides of the aisle.”The experience of planning debates and hearing two experts speak on national policy provides a valuable chance for people to engage in current events on campus, Hurson said.“It’s a great avenue for people who are interested in going into a career in politics, or in Washington or any kind of national security — any of those things,” she said. “What’s cool is we have the freedom to decide what topic we want to do, what expert we want to bring in and what kind of topic we want them to debate. And so it’s a great way to get the whole campus community engaged in current events.”Although the group’s upcoming inaugural debate — “North Korea and Nuclear Deterrence, is Secretary of State Rex Tillerson right in saying ‘The policy of strategic patience has ended?’” — is particularly timely, sophomore co-vice president of AHS Jane Bachkora said the group happened to be fortunate that the debaters’ expertise led them in the same direction as the current political climate.“We got really lucky, because when we decided to do North Korea, a lot of what’s currently happened hadn’t happened yet,” she said. “So we got lucky in that sense.”Director of the Peace Accords Matrix (PAM) at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and special advisor for policy studies at the Keough School of Global Affairs David Cortright will debate AHS expert and Georgetown professor Matthew Kroenig on Thursday at 6 p.m. in the Hesburgh Center Auditorium. Hurson said the group hopes this debate will pave the way for more debates, as well as regular meetings to discuss current events.“The goal would be to have two debates per semester,” she said. “For a bit of it, it kind of has a transient membership, because you need a core of about 10 or 12 committed people to help plan all the events and everything, but the idea is to get the whole campus just to come. The goal is always to have about 70-plus [people in] attendance at a debate.”Bachkora said getting involved with AHS and attending any debates the group hosts allows people to broaden their worldviews and strengthen their beliefs.“You can’t limit yourself to one point of view,” she said. “You can’t only watch FOX News, you can’t only read The New York Times. I believe the best way to educate yourself, and the best way to be informed and the best way to be an ideal citizen is to take in as many points of view as you can, and then be able to decide for yourself. … And I think this society does just that.”Tags: Alexander Hamilton Society, Debate, Foreign Policy, North Korealast_img read more

D.W. Brooks Lecture

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first_imgThe students and faculty of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences came together Nov. 12 to celebrate the progress that agriculture has made in the past 50 years and the promise of innovations to come.As part of the annual D.W. Brooks Lecture and Awards, the college recognized four of its most innovative and dedicated faculty members with D.W. Brooks Awards for Excellence.“These winners have been nominated by their peers and selected by a panel of judges and they represent some of the most noteworthy scientists and Extension professionals in the college,” said CAES Dean and Director Sam Pardue.Marc van Iersel, Vincent J. Dooley Professor of Horticulture, received the 2019 D.W. Brooks Award for Excellence in Research for his work in the area of energy efficiency and water-efficient irrigation in greenhouses and nurseries.Patricia J. Moore, professor and senior teaching fellow in the Department of Entomology, received the D.W. Brooks Award for Excellence in Teaching for her innovative teaching which employes a laser focus on including and encouraging all students — especially those underrepresented in STEM fields — to pursue scientific careers.Alfredo Martinez-Espinoza, professor in the Department of Plant Pathology, received the 2019 D.W Brooks Award for Excellence in Extension in recognition of his development of a dynamic Extension and applied research program that focuses on the management of new and recurring diseases of turfgrass, small grains and non-legume forages and his delivery of relevant information to stakeholders and fellow Extension professionals.Lori Purcell Bledsoe, Northwest District 4-H program development coordinator, received the 2019 D.W. Brooks Award in Public Service Extension for her work leading youth development efforts on the national level and her success expanding the number of young people served by Georgia 4-H across northeast Georgia.The college has awarded D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence in research, teaching and Extension since 1983. The D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence include a plaque and a $5,000 cash award. This year’s awards were presented at a luncheon preceding the D.W. Brooks Lecture.In addition to celebrating this year’s awards recipients, CAES students and faculty were challenged to tackle the necessary but hard work of helping to double the world’s food supply by 2050 by this year’s lecturer, Ambassador Ertharin Cousin, a 1982 graduate of the UGA School of Law and former executive director of the United Nations World Food Programme.Cousin has spent her career working to build more robust and sustainable food systems in food insecure countries around the world. In her talk, “Achieving Food Security and Planetary Health: A Solvable Enigma,” she challenged attendees to work collaboratively to continue to fight for data-backed interventions and policies that are needed to build sustainable food security in the face of a growing population and climate change.“There is nothing shameful, unrealistic or naïve about wanting a better world,” Cousin told the crowd. “Creating a global food system that fuels our human health and supports our planetary health is possible and achievable. (If) you still say it’s impossible; Nelson Mandela said, ‘It always seems impossible until it is done.’ ”“Getting it done requires acting collectively and universally at every level, but it must begin with each one of us overcoming our personal fears, our own personal xenophobia and our own personal resistance to change.”For a video of Cousin’s full address, visit youtu.be/DYtGCUnJhwk.For more information about the legacy of D.W. Brooks, visit dwbrooks.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

Outdoor Updates: Hiker missing in Hawaii found alive after 17 days

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first_imgIt’s raining plastic Hiker missing in Hawaii found alive after 17 days Despite stormy year, the health of the James River is improving Amanda Eller, 35, a physical therapist and yoga teacher, went missing after heading out on a short hike in Hawaii’s Makawao Forest Reserve on May 8. Her car, keys, wallet and cell phone were found in the parking lot of the reserve but Eller had disappeared. Police ended their search for the missing woman after a week, but friends and family kept looking, staging a massive manhunt while combing through thick forest and jungle in search of Eller. The latest Chesapeake Bay Report Card, a comprehensive analysis of the health of the Chesapeake Bay, was released last week. The report showed that the score for the James River changed from a B- in 2017 to a C in 2018. The lower score is a result of record precipitation and increased runoff, which resulted in the river receiving a score of F for water clarity. But despite the lower score, advocates say that the health and resiliency of the river is improving over the long term. center_img Virginia recently released its draft plan for meeting Chesapeake Bay cleanup goals by 2025. The plan acts as a road map to lead the James River to a score of A, meet pollution reduction targets and restore the health of the Chesapeake Bay. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality is accepting comments on the plan through June 7. A helicopter spotted her on Saturday while lying in a creek bed between two waterfalls, suffering from a leg fracture and injured ankles, but otherwise alert and in good condition. Eller says she got turned around after taking a break while walking on the trail and ventured farther and farther into the forest in search of her car. She survived by eating wild berries and guava and drinking clear water. An analysis of rain collected at six sites in the Denver-Boulder urban corridor and 2 sites in the Colorado Front Range shows that 90 percent of the water sampled contains plastic. The plastic material consists primarily of fibers in all colors that cannot be seen unless magnified. Plastic beads and shards were also identified under magnification. Plastic showed up more frequently in the rain collected in urban areas than it did in the rain collected from more isolated areas. However, plastic was also identified in washout samples from the isolated Loch Vale site in Rocky Mountain National Park. More research is needed to determine how these plastic materials are accumulating and being assimilated into the environment.last_img read more

Honduran Armed Forces Build Reservoirs to Help Civilians

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first_imgTwo machine operators, two assistants, and one person in charge of security is supporting each work site. The Honduran Armed Forces’ First Battalion of Engineers is constructing hundreds of water reservoirs to assist civilians in a drought-stricken area known as the “Dry Corridor,” which includes 132 towns in 14 departments throughout the country’s southern, western, and central zones. In addition to the water reservoir venture, the Engineering Battalion is also participating in other development projects throughout Honduras, including the construction of public aerodromes and secondary highways, such as the one running between Tegucigalpa and Cerro La Mole. Armed Forces coordinate with local officials The Armed Forces is working hard to provide water and the ability to grow agricultural crops to multiple communities. The Engineer Battalion is planning to finish construction on six reservoirs every 21 days in the communities that need them the most, with the goal of installing 500 reservoirs in each department that’s facing a drought, according to Col. Leiva. The working relationship among the communities, the SAG, and the Armed Forces is very strong. Nationally, Honduras is suffering greatly from the effects of climate change – so much so it tops Germanwatch’s 2015 Global Climate Risk Index, a list of nations most vulnerable to climate change. By Dialogo December 14, 2015 Very good. All the reporting is very important In particular, climate change is negatively impacting the country’s agricultural and forestry production, according to Engineering Colonel José Hilario Leiva Rivera, Commander of the Honduran Armed Forces’ First Battalion of Engineers. Farmers and others who work in agriculture maintain a delicate system dependent upon rain, but their production has been hindered, and they’ve suffered economic losses because the rain cycle has been affected by climate change. Among the groups caring for the forestry in its region is United to Grow, which is in the town of Ocotal, in Olancho department, and works to fight illegal logging and prevent forest fires. Thanks to the reservoir the Armed Forces built, farmers can now irrigate 14 hectares of land that are used to grow tomatoes, bell peppers, corn, cucumbers, beans, pumpkins, eggplants, squash, and other crops. After the SAG reviewed it, the Armed Forces and the mayor finalized each agreement and workers started building reservoirs under the direction of the Engineer Battalion, which includes a construction team of seven frontmen and 10 specialists. “For Honduras, this project of constructing water collection systems represents a positive investment in its people and will grant independence to farmers since farming depends on the rains and is thus among the most vulnerable to climate change,” Col. Leiva said. “The reservoirs or water collection systems are bound to be quite useful during the dry season, seeing that most have a capacity of 30,000-60,000 cubic meters of water.” About 95 percent of Honduran crops rely solely on climate conditions whereas only 5 percent are irrigated, according to data from the Irrigation Systems Directorate of the Honduran Secretary of Agriculture and Livestock (SAG). center_img “A community that has good agricultural output won’t think of abandoning the source of their livelihood. In addition to this, they will also have cheaper food and a greater variety of products to consume because they will have water they can irrigate their crops with.” “We have to change our attitudes. We can no longer plant crops on the same dates that we always have. To this end, work will need to be done on projects dealing with sustainable development and, more than anything else, proper management and conservation of water,” the president added. “Three hundred thirty-five million lempiras (US$15.07 million) are needed to grow the size of the battalion, which is in charge of this water reservoir project and of providing appropriate responses to other situations that arise as a result of climate change,” Col. Leiva said. To make their work across the country more efficient, Armed Forces authorities conducted a study to determine how to expand the battalion’s units in four strategic points throughout the country. Ambitious goals Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández instructed the Engineer Battalion to construct reservoirs in 13 different departments because “the phenomenon of climate change has severely changed precipitation patterns,” he said in a press statement. “Those close to where the reservoirs are built will now have the additional responsibility of caring for the area surrounding the reservoir, which includes reforestation, the planting of grass that is used for retention around the perimeter of the drainage system,” Salgado said. “The SAG then constructs drip irrigation systems and trains people on how to use them so that no water is wasted.” The Engineering Battalion has also been charged with building a community 19 kilometers from Tegucigalpa in the department of Francisco Morazán, which is where the Honduran Air Force’s radars are located, and with constructing a runway and perimeter roads on the Caribbean Cisne Islands, some 250 kilometers northwest of mainland Honduras. “The landowners upon whose lands the reservoirs are constructed have signed agreements charging them with the responsibility of distributing and providing water to others in their communities.” Ensuring that farmers can plant and harvest crops is crucial to the country’s food supply, according to engineer Fabio Salgado, a SAG specialist. The Armed Forces are coordinating with local government officials to make the reservoir project a success. The agreements would remain in effect if owners sell their land. last_img read more

How will its garden centres grow?

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first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

EC launches broad, beyond-PEPP private pensions consultation

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first_img“As key players in capital markets, increasing investment in personal pensions is one of the priorities of the Capital Markets Union. They offer the potential to inject more savings into capital markets and channel additional financing to productive investments.”The Commission said the consultation would help it analyse the case for an EU personal pension framework.It is the latest step taken by the Commission in relation to developing private pensions in the EU, with EIOPA drafted in to provide advice.The Commission noted that its recent consultation built on previous consultations by it and EIOPA “but increases their scope”.In its advice to the Commission, EIOPA favoured a pan-European personal pension product (PEPP) under a so-called 2nd regime, complementing existing private pension products and for voluntary adoption by providers.It stuck by this in its recent, final advice to the Commission.This idea, however, is only one of the options the Commission includes in its consultation, which it said could range from “self-regulatory approaches (cooperation among stakeholders) to more comprehensive EU intervention (harmonising at EU level the national personal pension regimes)”.It floats four possible approaches on that spectrum, one of which is a European personal pension account akin to the Individual Retirement Account (IRA) in the US.Margot Jilet, policy adviser at PensionsEurope, said this looked like a new option the Commission was considering.“They haven’t skewed the consultation toward any one approach,” she told IPE. “That’s in line with what they previously indicated – that they would adopt a broad consultation.”Indeed, the Commission said it aimed to build on EIOPA’s advice and “widen the range of possible options and stakeholders consulted”.The Commission’s consultation on private pensions was expected to be published in early July but is said to have been delayed as a result of the Brexit-spurred resignation of the UK’s commissioner, Jonathan Hill, in charge of the financial stability, financial services and CMU brief.Latvia’s Valdis Dombrovskis has succeeded him.Speaking at the PensionsEurope conference in Brussels on 23 June – the day of the UK referendum – Hill told delegates the Commission would be launching a consultation on personal pensions before the summer break, and that a feasibility study was already underway.He said a public hearing would be held in October; it is now said this could be delayed.The consultation closes on 31 October.,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to European Commission “Public consultation on a potential EU personal pension framework” The European Commission has launched a consultation on a potential EU framework for personal pensions, which builds on previous consultations by it and the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) but has broader scope.The consultation is public and aimed at identifying potential obstacles to the take-up of third-pillar pension products. It is part of the Commission’s Capital Markets Union (CMU) project, which aims to develop the capital markets in the European Union to boost economic growth, in particular by freeing up financing for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).“The consultation,” it said, “will enable the Commission to assess what can be done at EU level to support a wider choice of personal pensions competing across borders.last_img read more

200 migrants feared dead after their boats sink off the Coast…

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first_imgBodies of Migrants taken from the sea Up to 200 people are feared dead after two boats packed with mainly African migrants bound for Italy sank off the coast of Libya.Reports say over 200 were rescued by the Libyan coast guard.A security official in the western town of Zuwara, from where the overcrowded boats had set off, said there were around 400 people on board on one of the boats.The first boat is said to have signaled for help on Thursday.The other boat with 400 migrants on board capsized later on.Many appeared to have been trapped in the hold when it capsized.By late in the evening, the Libyan coast guard rescued around 201, of which 147 were taken to a detention facility for migrants in Sabratha, west of Tripoli.The migrants on board were from sub-Saharan Africa, Pakistan, Syria, Morocco and Bangladesh.Many of the migrants make the risky journeys in overcrowded boatsAnother local official and a journalist based in Zuwara confirmed the sinking but also had no information on casualties.The migrants on boardwere from sub-Saharan Africa, Pakistan, Syria, Morocco and Bangladesh, the security official said.Zuwara, Libya’s most western town located near the Tunisian border, is a major launchpad for smugglers shipping migrants to Italy.Cross-border smuggler networks exploit the country’s lawlessness and chaos to bring Syrians into Libya via Egypt or nationals of sub-Saharan countries via Niger, Sudan and Chad.More than 2,300 people have died so far this year in attempts to reach Europe by sea, compared with 3,279 in the past 12 months, according to the International Organisation for Migration.It comes as thousands of migrants and refugees a day are travelling between Greece to Hungary as they seek a better life in the European Union.last_img read more

‘Ursula’ victim thankful for Iloilo gov’t aid

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first_img“It was on Dec. 25. I was in Manilabecause I was supposed to return to Kuwait to work as a domestic helper,” deAsis related. Left with two children, aged 19 yearsand 16 years, she said the financial aid she received from the provincialgovernment could help them start anew. Aside from cash, the provincialgovernment also promised to provide her a job. Pador said the assistance could help thefamilies settle their burial expenses and support their daily needs. In a separate interview, PSWDO head, Dr.Neneth Pador, said the provincial government would also find a scholarshipprogram for her two remaining children. ILOILO City — Nothing could assuage the grief of a 36-year-old woman fromBarotac Nuevo town after she lost her husband and three children to TyphoonUrsula on Christmas Day, but the assistance from Iloilo’s provincial governmentcould help her move forward. Andria de Asis (center), whose husband and three children perished during the onslaught of Typhoon Ursula on Christmas Day, receives financial assistance from Iloilo’s Provincial Social Welfare and Development Office head Dr. Neneth Pador (left) and provincial administrator, lawyer Suzette Mamon, on Jan. 17, 2020. PNA In total, the PSWDO released P320,000 tothe families of Ursula victims.center_img She recalled the tragic Christmas Eve inBatad town where her family spent their vacation. Meanwhile, a cash-for-work program wouldbe arranged to assist families whose houses were damaged by the typhoon, shesaid. (With a report from PNA/PN) De Asis received P80,000 as her husbandRoel, 41; their children Rose Mae, 15; Roel Jr., 10; and Rhianna, 3, perishedin a flood caused by the typhoon. “I am thankful, but the pain is stillhere as no amount could equate to human life. Still, I am thankful to Gov.Arthur Defensor Jr. as our problem in (the) financial aspect is at least beinggiven a solution,” Andria de Asis said in an interview on Friday. De Asis and 15 others who lost familymembers during the onslaught of “Ursula” each received PHP20,000 in cash fromthe provincial government through the Provincial Social Welfare and DevelopmentOffice (PSWDO).last_img read more

College Scene

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first_imgAs we move into mid September, many of you are spending your weekends following your favorite college football team. What started out to be simple rivalries in the Ivy League Schools has grown into a multi-billion dollar industry. I can’t believe someone like Alonzo Stagg could have imagined going to the University of Michigan on a bright September Saturday along with 110,000 of his closest friends to watch Michigan play Eastern Michigan. Not only are these crowds enormous, but the competition for having the biggest stadium keeps growing. Even if you are not part of one of the power conferences, your alumni believe they need a 50,000 to 60,000 seat stadium. If you ask the president of any university and (if he gives you an honest answer) his main task is not producing Rhodes Scholars but filling the athletic venues. President Gee of Ohio State lost his job because he made a joke about Notre Dame and their football program. No one bothered to check what the university accomplished under his leadership in academics when he opened his mouth about college sports. This shows you where the focus is as far as media is concerned in college today. You are a good college president if your athletic department is making money. You get little recognition if your graduation rate is the highest in the nation but you don’t win football games. What has happened to our values that beating your arch rival has become more important than educating your students?last_img read more

Chip seal work on US 421 in Ripley County now set for tomorrow

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first_imgRipley County, IN —The road closure on U.S. 421 between U.S. 50 and C.R. 300 N. in Ripley County is planned on Wednesday for chip seal operations. The closure is weather dependent and will be rescheduled if necessary. Access will be maintained for local residents, all thru traffic should utilize S.R. 129 and S.R. 350 as alternate routes. Following work on U.S. 421, crews will move to S.R. 101 between U.S. 50 and I-74last_img