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John Rando May Direct B’way-Aimed King Kong Musical

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first_img Tony winner Rando is currently directing a workshop of The Honeymooners, which will open at Goodspeed next September. King Kong features a score by Marius de Vries, along with revamped 1930s Broadway songs and additional numbers from artists like Sarah McLachlan, Robert Del Naja, Justice, Guy Garvey and The Avalanches. King Kong still has his sights set on the Great White Way! According to the New York Times, On the Town director John Rando is in talks to helm the Broadway-aimed mega-musical monster thriller. The 2013 Australian production of King Kong was helmed by Daniel Kramer. Marsha Norman (The Bridges of Madison County) has recently been brought in to write the book, replacing Craig Lucas. Set against the backdrop of bustling New York City in the 1930s, the show tells the story of the infamous ape and his encounter with aspiring actress Ann Darrow, megalomaniac filmmaker Carl Denham, stubborn first mate Jack Driscoll and the people of NYC. View Commentslast_img read more

Holiday Inn, Hairspray Live! & More to Perform at Macy’s Parade

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first_imgThe cast of ‘Holiday Inn'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Halloween is over and it’s time to come off of that sugar high and start thinking turkey and a parade of early morning Broadway performances. The 90th annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will kick off the holiday season later this month, and as always, it promises to offer appearances from Broadway’s best.Among those performing as part of the parade are the casts of Holiday Inn, the Broadway revival of Cats, NBC’s forthcoming Hairspray Live! and—as is the case every year—the Radio City Rockettes, who begin performances in the Christmas Spectacular at Radio City Music Hall on November 11. More performances from Broadway productions will be announced at a later date.Additional participants in this year’s parade include Hamilton Tony nominee Christopher Jackson, Tony Bennett, Daya, Sandra Lee, Sarah McLachlan, Regina Spektor and the cast of Sesame Street.The 90th annual event, hosted by The Today Show’s Matt Lauer, Savannah Guthrie and Al Roker, will be broadcast on NBC on November 24. View Commentslast_img read more

New commission?

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first_imgBy University of GeorgiaOn April 29, Gov. Sonny Perdue signed a bill to allow Georgia’s horticulture industry to hold a referendum to create a commodity commission for ornamental horticulture. Town hall-type meetings will be held across the state to give producers a chance to learn more about the program, the way it would operate and the people who would be elected to shape the program’s future. The meeting dates and locations are: June 9 – Sugar Hill Nurseries, 2122 Highway 341 South, Yatesville, Ga., 31097June 11 – Wakoola Water Gardens, 5235 Union Hill Rd, Cumming, Ga., 30040June 16 – Casa Mexico, 311 GA Hwy 49 North, Byron, Ga., 31008June 17 – Ag Center, 65 11th Avenue, NE, Cairo, Ga., 39828June 18 – ABAC, Horticulture Building, Tifton, Ga., 31793June 23 – Christ Church at Whitewater, 1577 Highway 85 South, Fayetteville, Ga., 30215June 30- Jasper Extension Office, 109 Depot Street, Jasper, Ga., 30143All producers of ornamental horticulture products are encouraged to attend, regardless of their operation’s size. Meetings will begin at 6 p.m. with a complementary cookout.For directions to the meetings or to learn more, go to the Web site www.gahortcommission.org.last_img read more

European offshore wind capacity up 18% in 2018

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first_imgEuropean offshore wind capacity up 18% in 2018 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享CNBC:European offshore wind capacity grew by 18 percent in 2018, according to statistics from trade body WindEurope. Europe installed 2.6 gigawatts (GW) of new offshore capacity, with 15 new offshore wind farms coming online.Breaking the figures down, the U.K. and Germany led the way, accounting for 85 percent of the region’s new capacity. The U.K. installed 1.3 GW, while Germany was responsible for 969 megawatts (MW). Overall, Europe’s total offshore capacity now stands at 18.5 GW.WindEurope added that the “size and scale” of offshore wind in Europe was continuing to rise, with the average size of new turbines installed in 2018 hitting 6.8 MW, a 15 percent increase compared to 2017.Europe is now home to 105 offshore wind farms including the world’s largest, Walney Extension. Officially opened in September 2018, it is located in the Irish Sea, has a total capacity of 659 MW and generates electricity for almost 600,000 homes. The facility uses 87 turbines – 40 MHI-Vestas 8.25 MW turbines and 47 Siemens Gamesa 7 MW turbines – and covers an area equal to roughly 20,000 soccer pitches.Europe’s offshore wind statistics come in the same week that the Global Wind Energy Council announced that North, Central and South America installed 11.9 GW of wind power capacity in 2018. This represents an increase of 12 percent compared to 2017, with total installed wind capacity for the Americas now standing at 135 GW.More: Offshore wind capacity in Europe increased by 18 percent last yearlast_img read more

Court considers judicial pro bono

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first_img Court considers judicial pro bono Associate Editor When the Florida Supreme Court adopted a pro bono plan in 1993, it encouraged attorneys to give 20 hours a year in free legal services to the poor or contribute $350 to legal aid organizations. Included was a mandatory requirement to report whether lawyers did or did not participate.That reporting requirement, arguably, has made all the difference in making Florida the model of pro bono service in the nation.Last year alone, nearly 30,000 of Florida’s 70,000 lawyers provided 1.3 million hours of pro bono service, and 6,784 lawyers contributed more than $2.5 million.Now these new questions are before the Supreme Court: Should judges and their staff lawyers, who have been exempt in the past, now be encouraged to perform pro bono community service in the limited, nonadversarial ways that members of the judiciary are allowed? And should they be required to report their pro bono contributions, as has worked so well with lawyers?At oral arguments November 7 (in cases SC02-147, SC02-1034), First District Court of Appeal Judge William Van Nortwick, Jr., chair of the Task Force on Pro Bono Services by the Judiciary and Judicial Staff Attorneys, was outnumbered in arguing that the reporting requirement was a good thing for judges, too, in order to “develop a strong culture of pro bono service” statewide.“Frankly, we felt like it worked so well with the lawyers, that it could be adopted for the judiciary,” Van Nortwick told the justices.“Just the idea of having over 800 judges available to talk and teach in the school system about the judicial system and the importance of access and the independence of the judiciary, I think we would greatly enhance access and the culture of pro bono that the task force is interested in.”But representatives of the three Florida conferences — district court of appeal, circuit court, and county court judges — as well as The Florida Bar voiced concern that the reporting requirement would do damage to the independence of the judiciary.Instead, they sided with the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee that also calls for amending the Code of Judicial Conduct to encourage “certain activities to improve the law, the legal system and the administration of justice” — but does not go so far as to recommend the reporting requirement and monitoring contributions to particular organizations.“The reporting requirements are a tremendous disservice to the trial court,” 11th Circuit Chief Judge Joseph Farina vehemently argued on behalf of the Florida Conference of Circuit Court Judges.“We are already second-guessed why we make certain decisions. Is it because we know somebody? Is it because we prefer a certain class of persons? Is it because we have a preference for certain folks? By having the reporting requirements, people will be able, through their own perception, decide, ‘Yes!’ — because we happen to do some community service for a landlord or a tenant or a business person, that that’s why we made the decision we made. The reporting requirement will bite us severely and will harm the neutrality in the courtroom and the credibility we have as decisionmakers.”Farina ended with this warning: “Revision 7 is right around the corner, folks. This is no time to have the eyes of folks in this state, to have the perception that judges are going to support a particular class of persons. We need to maintain our neutrality and our credibility, and not supply ammunition to actually debunk and hurt us.”But the newest justice, Raoul Cantero, wondered: “If we have a reporting requirement, why would a judge speak before a pro-business group, or a pro-landlord group, or a pro-tenant group? Why wouldn’t they just stick to the community services that you are already doing, knowing they are going report that?”Judge Farina answered that the JEAC proposal, minus the reporting requirement, would go far enough to encourage such worthwhile community service, and asked for that opportunity to prove it.Justice Peggy Quince asked: “Does the reporting requirement or the payment of money change this from an encouragement to participate in these activities to actually mandating participation in these kinds of activities?”Eleventh Circuit Judge Scott Silverman, of the JEAC, answered that though it would not be mandatory, “when you have an aspirational goal of paying money to organizations, when you have an aspirational goal of keeping track of specific hours, it will have an impact on the judiciary. Particularly, it will have an impact on who gets these dollars and these hours on the part of judges. It could raise significant concerns about the impartiality of the judiciary.”Bar President-elect Miles McGrane agreed.“We believe that the appearance of the judge being impartial is just primary to the system of justice,” McGrane said. “We believe the task force position could put that in question.”Another point of contention in the task force proposal is its emphasis on judges providing community service work that “improves access to justice,” as the Supreme Court had asked the group to focus.“The difference between these two proposals is the difference in vision and the difference in goal,” Van Nortwick said. “Both proposals laudably encourage judges to engage in activities including teaching and speaking that will improve the system of justice. But our proposal is more specifically addressed to improving access to justice. . . . whether that be talking to lawyers about doing pro bono, or whether that be working to improve the way pro se self-represented litigants deal with the system, or teaching in schools or civic groups.”He added: “Since the poor are disproportionately denied access, I guess you could come up with an argument that, therefore, it is impartial. But that seems to me to stand impartiality on its head.”Making that very argument was Second District Court of Appeal Judge Chris Altenbernd, on behalf of the Conference of DCA Judges: “If this court enters a rule that says that we are preferred to go and speak on the issue of helping the poor, what is the middle class going to think of this?”Justice Barbara Pariente asked whether law clerks should be allowed to perform pro bono services, saying the high court now allows them to volunteer at homeless shelters and teen courts and serve as guardians ad litem.“The conference actually opposes that for the staff attorneys, as well as for (judges),” Altenbernd answered. “I have a staff attorney who believes deeply in these issues and has worked hard to try to find things to do. In the end, she has found that the mentoring process is the far better solution, because every time she went out to do something, she was perceived as my staff attorney, and there was prestige in that. We deal with the appearance of impropriety.”Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead interjected: “I hope you do not oppose staff attorneys doing those things, or do you oppose mandatory reporting?”Answered Alternbernd: “I oppose mandatory reporting and monetary contributions. I do believe community service, as opposed to pro bono service, is a far safer thing for staff attorneys to do, because they, too, need to avoid the practice of law.”Altenbernd added that “every single one of us is a Type A personality or we wouldn’t have these jobs. We will have 30 hours and 40 hours and 80 hours, people sort of competing with each other. Many of these judges are elected. I am not. But we create a situation where we are pressuring judges to go out and do things other than their job.”That pressure on judges to do community service on top of their demanding jobs, he warned, “will end up causing people to violate the canons.”Chief Justice Anstead said he was concerned about the “policing aspect” of reporting requirements when dealing with the “qualitative differences” between lawyers who run businesses of private practice and judicial officers who are public servants.“It’s sort of an insult to them, that they are recognizing their responsibilities 24 hours a day and working hard at their public responsibilities, and yet they are going to be policed in this reporting way,” Chief Justice Anstead said.“And they don’t have nearly the freedom of action that lawyers do in terms of organizing their time and activities. I’m concerned about that, that this could become a divisive distraction amongst these very important public servants that carry our judicial system on their shoulders.”Van Nortwick responded: “Well, as you noted, Chief Justice Anstead, that same type of argument was made by the Bar (with lawyers pro bono service in the past). And frankly, in the history of the Florida pro bono system, which is unique in the United States with its mandatory reporting requirement, there have been no examples that I am aware of about these horrible consequences. I realize that judges are different than lawyers—there’s no doubt about that. But judges have mandatory continuing judicial education, and that hasn’t, to me, seemed to impose an insult on their professional character.”Twenty hours, he added, is not that much of a burden spread out over an entire year.Justice Fred Lewis asked about the true purpose of reporting.“You made the statement that judges are already doing these things,” Justice Lewis said. “What is our purpose, if the judiciary is engaged in this kind of activity? Is the recordkeeping one that we really want to beat our own drum? Because it seems to me that our efforts, rather than self-promotion, should be content of delivery.”Beyond increasing the “pro bono culture” throughout Florida, Van Nortwick answered, that reporting supplies information valuable in improving the pro bono system.Chief Justice Anstead asked if that pro bono culture, that thrives in areas such as Orange County, could be spread throughout Florida’s 20 circuits without the reporting requirement.“That’s a question I don’t know the answer to,” admitted Van Nortwick, who was very involved in creating the lawyer pro bono plan nearly a decade ago.“I can tell you the answer in Florida has been that when you compare Florida to other states, which adopted similar pro bono plans without reporting, the amount of pro bono work in Florida is geometrically greater, where the difference is only in reporting.. . . We suggest that it will also enhance the quality and quantity for judges.” Court considers judicial pro bono December 1, 2002 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

Medford Man High on Heroin in Fatal Crash, Cops Say

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Justin KleinA Medford man has been accused of driving while high on heroin in a crash that killed a 71-year-old woman in her hometown of East Patchogue on Wednesday evening.Suffolk County police arrested Justin Klein and charged him with charged with driving while ability impaired by drugs and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Court records indicate investigators found he was in possession of heroin at the time.Police said the 23-year-old, who is employed by 84 Lumber, was driving a Chevrolet commercial pickup truck southbound on Sills Road when he struck a Chevrolet Classic at the corner of Gazzola Drive at 5:45 p.m.The driver of that vehicle, Camille Ricciardo, was pronounced dead at the scene.Klein was taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center in East Patchogue, where he was treated for non-life-threatening injuries.He will be arraigned Thursday at First District Court in Central Islip.Vehicular Crime Unit detectives ask anyone with information about this crime to contact them 631-852-6555.last_img read more

Don’t discount dormant accounts

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first_imgPockets of opportunity exist within nearly every credit union’s credit card portfolio. To find them, cards teams must turn over even the most lackluster of stones. In credit card terrain, these stones are those accounts still open but rarely, if ever, used.The key to success is identifying which of a portfolio’s dormant accounts offers the greatest potential for reactivation. Like every segment within a credit card portfolio, the dormant segment is composed of a variety of subsegments. The subsegment with the most potential is the one composed of inactive cardholders who are still actively engaged in other areas of the credit union.First, identify those cardholders who are currently taking advantage of other credit union products, such as mortgage or auto loans, perhaps even business accounts. With the right offer, these individuals are much more likely to reengage with the credit card product than their less active counterparts.Next, filter out accounts with the least revenue potential. A good place to start is by excluding cardholders who only take advantage of promotional periods, such as free interest for 12 months.After you have established this core group of dormant accounts, analyze as much internal and external data as you can. Your objective now is to gain an understanding of how these members stand to benefit from reactivation of their credit cards. Are they actively using other credit cards? What has happened to their FICO scores in recent months? Where are they on the member or life-stage journey?The answers to these questions help segment the cardholders into groups that can be targeted with specific offers. Our analysts find dormant credit card account owners generally fall into one of four basic categories:They need a different product: Members may be using a variety of credit union products to meet their financial needs, even though a credit card may be more sensible when coupled with a competitive, even below-market, APR.They need a higher credit line: Cardholders may be inactive simply because their credit union hasn’t extended as much credit as has another issuer.They need a different APR: If the APR is too high to be competitive, members will naturally turn to other issuers for a better option.They have multiple needs: A combination of the above keeps members from using their cards.With a clearer picture of your cardholders’ needs, you can more effectively mine the gold that could be hiding within your dormant account segment. A few ideas:Execute an upgrade campaign – Offering basic card account holders an opportunity to own a rewards card, for instance, can breathe new life into a portfolio (not to mention, member relationships).Provide credit line increases – Cardholders rarely consider asking their issuers to change what many of them perceive to be set-in-stone limits. Instead of charging up four different cards with small balances, cardholders may prefer to use a single card with a higher limit. Be that card!Set a down pricing strategy – With the right data and a good analytics partner with knowledge of the current competitive landscape, your pricing can better align with more of your members’ expectations.Give them cash back – The primary reason credit card accounts go dormant is their owners lack truly valuable incentives to use their cards. This is especially true among high-income cardholders. Cash back rewards are one of the best ways to incentivize these cardholders.Beyond optimizing the credit card portfolio, the exercise above will provide countless insights into the habits, behaviors and preferences of the consumers who have already chosen to align with your credit union in some way or another. Talk about a high-target audience. The member intelligence gathered by the cards team can be helpful to any number of leaders within the cooperative, each working to know more about the consumers they serve. 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Zarana Shah Zarana Shah is Manager of Analytics at IQR Consulting, a provider of data analytics solutions to retail and financial services firms. With more than six years of analytics and consulting … Web: www.iqrdataanalytics.com Detailslast_img read more

PODCAST: A better member experience

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first_imgAs a nationwide provider of residential mortgage lending services, QRL Financial Services has made a steadfast commitment to help credit unions achieve more profitable mortgage operations while delivering an exceptional experience for their borrowers.The company’s suite of offerings includes mortgage fulfillment services, retail lending, wholesale lending, correspondent lending, and sub-servicing.In this podcast, QRL Financial Services Vice President of Business Development Tom Secor and Vice President Sales Manager James Abegglen describe how their company partners with hundreds of credit unions to ease the increasing demands that technology, compliance, and personnel place on the mortgage process. Credit unions can maintain control of the front end of the mortgage process, ensuring member engagement online or in person. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

LI Reps Split On EPA’s Efforts To Curb Carbon Emissions & Combat Climate Change

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York While the nations of the world heard President Obama take the pledge in Paris this week that the United States would do more to combat climate change, the House of Representatives passed two measures apparently aimed at undercutting him.Here on Long Island, which is especially vulnerable to rising sea levels from global warming, the votes are split along party lines on these resolutions, which would weaken the Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to reduce carbon emissions from existing and future coal-fired power plants.Freshman Republican Congressman Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley) says he supported the two joint resolutions—already approved by the Republican-controlled Senate—because the EPA’s so-called “Clean Power Rule” could significantly raise electricity bills on Long Island.“Some forecasts see potential costs as high as $366 billion to $479 billion over the period 2017-2031,” he told the Press in an email. “While I support clean and renewable energy on Long Island, I am opposed to unfunded EPA mandates that ignore the role of Congress and the Constitution. Any deal negotiated in Paris must be presented to the Senate in the manner proscribed by the U.S. Constitution. The President has no authorization from Congress to commit any U.S. taxpayer money to other nations or to agree to any unconstitutional regulations that would infringe on our nation’s sovereignty.”As a longtime elected official from eastern Suffolk, Zeldin says he’s always been a staunch supporter of clean energy and protecting Long Island’s environment. But he found fault with the Obama administration on this important issue.“While protecting the environment is one of my priorities, hearing our president compare the threat of climate change to that of ISIS, or hearing Secretary of State John Kerry call climate change ‘the world’s most fearsome weapon of mass destruction,’ shows how completely out of touch this administration is on foreign policy, especially in light of the recent terror attacks in Paris.”Also serving her first term in Congress, Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-Garden City) vehemently disagreed. She saw the resolutions as the latest attempts to prevent the EPA from doing its job, as well as undermining President Obama as he pursues an international climate treaty in Paris. And, just as clearly, she agreed with the Secretary of State’s assessment of the issue.“Climate change is not only a threat to the environment and public health–it’s a threat to our national security,” said Rice in an email. “It’s a threat to our energy grid and to our troops on the ground all over the world who are forced to spend massive amounts of time transporting, retrieving, storing and protecting fossil fuels. While politicians and special interests debate whether or not climate change is real, our military leaders are taking action and leading the effort to diversify our energy grid, develop alternative energy sources, and reduce fossil fuel dependency.”An aerial view of the City of Long Beach after Superstorm Sandy. (Kevin Kane/Long Island Press)She outlined the perils of doing nothing to reduce heat-trapping carbon in the atmosphere, one of the leading causes of global warming, because “those of us on Long Island have a tremendous amount to lose as sea levels will continue to rise and extreme weather events like Superstorm Sandy will become more frequent and more intense.”Rice stressed the importance of investing in renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power to create good jobs and economic opportunities here. “We have to capitalize on our potential to be a leader in the transition to a cleaner, greener economy,” she said.Rice’s assessment that climate change is a national security issue echoes a 2014 report published by a military advisory board consisting of retired generals and other military officials, including former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta. “During our decades of experience in the U.S. military, we have addressed many national security challenges, from containment and deterrence of the Soviet nuclear threat during the Cold War to political extremism and transnational terrorism in recent years,” the panel wrote in the report titled “National Security and the Accelerating Risks of Climate Change.” “The national security risks of projected climate change are as serious as any challenges we have faced.”Long Island’s longest-serving congressman, Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford), never responded to explain his votes or his views on climate change, despite repeated attempts to reach him, as of press time. Long Island’s senior Democratic Congressman, Rep. Steve Israel (D-Dix Hills) agreed with his party’s colleague from Nassau.“We have a moral responsibility to take action to protect families and communities from the negative impacts of climate damage,” said Rep. Israel in an email. “These dangerous Republican resolutions prevent our country from taking practical steps to curb carbon pollution and keep the air we breathe clean. We all know the effects that dirtier air and water will have on future generations and coastal communities like Long Island.”Adding urgency to the climate change debate is the potential devastation to our region, considering that a large section of New York City and the South Shore of Long Island lies less than 10 feet above sea level now, and that puts hundreds of thousands of people at risk during major storm events, whether from excessive rainfall or hurricanes. Based on some current projections, the average sea level could rise 8 inches by 2020 and by almost two feet by 2050.Environmentalists railed against the House votes, calling “these attempted giveaways for industry…extreme legislation that no New York member of Congress can justify supporting” because it would block climate action and clean air protections, according to Peter Iwanowicz, executive director of watchdog group Environmental Advocates of New York.By supporting the bills, Iwanowicz said in an email, Reps. Zeldin and King “are placing the interests of western polluters over our public health here at home.”While world leaders are convening in Paris “to plan global climate action,” Iwanowicz added, the goal of the House of Representatives is “to thwart progress.”“Climate change has taken an enormous human and economic toll that is only expected to get worse in the years ahead,” he said. “New York is already ahead of schedule on meeting standards required under the Clean Power Plan thanks to the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). There is no justification for any New York member of Congress to support this effort.”last_img read more

ICE-loving sheriffs melt on Election Day

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first_img“In the last decade, Conway’s agency has identified more than 21,000 people to hand over to ICE,” the report said. “Since 2017, Gwinnett, Georgia’s second-­most populous county, has helped to detain more immigrants than any other county except five counties in states along the US-Mexico border.” Following Taylor’s advancement to the general this year, ICE did what it does when its overreach gets checked: threaten retaliation by saying it would escalate raids in the area. Taylor refused to budge—and won.Also in Georgia, Cobb County Police Department major Craig Owens defeated incumbent Republican sheriff Neil Warren 54.7% to 45.2% after also vowing to end the department’s 287(g) agreement. – Advertisement – “Are we doing the job of a federal agent? And why are we wasting resources?” Owens told Cobb County Courier during the Democratic primary earlier this year. “And that’s something I’m not in support of. I’m not in support of it because I think we can put those resources we put in that program to other resources in the county to help our crime rate come down.”“And I think if immigration is a federal task, they should be handling it,” he continued. “And I can use my resources I’m putting into that to other things within the community to help my community out. And that’s why I think I could refocus that.” Impeached president Donald Trump endlessly claimed that pro-immigrant policies implemented by localities are dangerous. That’s of course a lie.But pro-ICE candidates were also booted out elsewhere! In Ohio, Charmaine McGuffey defeated Republican Bruce Hoffbauer 52% to 47% to become the first woman, as well as first openly gay person, to serve as Hamilton County sheriff. She in fact defeated not one, but two pro-ICE opponents this year, massively trouncing incumbent sheriff Jim Neil during the Democratic primary earlier this year, 70% to 30%. Neil not only collaborated with ICE, but also attended a rally—in full uniform—for then-candidate Donald Trump in 2016, for which he later apologized.- Advertisement – The Appeal reported last month that Hoffbauer, who was subsequently endorsed by sour grapes Neil, vowed to “be even more active in partnering with ICE than it has been under Neil,” but didn’t say how exactly. Thankfully we’ll never have to find out. In Arizona’s Maricopa County, Prism also reports incumbent Democratic sheriff Paul Penzone “continues to hold a sizable lead” over Republican Jerry Sheridan, who served as a deputy to disgraced former sheriff and noted racist Joe Arpaio. In the final weeks leading up to the general election, Sheridan loudly complained about people continuing to bring up his former boss, telling Arizona Republic “[I] have a difficult time trying to convince people, ‘Hey, I’m not Joe (Arpaio).” But he spent six years showing Maricopa County that was exactly who he was.center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more