Month: January 2021

Welch announces $380,000 grant for downtown St Albans

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first_imgRepresentative Peter Welch announced Monday a $380,000 grant for a comprehensive economic revitalization project in downtown St. Albans.The federal grant, which Welch secured for the city, will help St. Albans improve sidewalks, streetlights and signage and make other aesthetic upgrades to Main Street and Taylor Park. The project is intended to make downtown St. Albans safer for families and more attractive to businesses. Downtown St. Albans is the heart of this community and the key to its future, Welch said. This grant will put federal dollars to work in St. Albans, spurring economic growth in the area and empowering residents to make decisions about how to improve their community.Welch made the announcement on Main Street in St. Albans Monday morning, alongside Mayor Marty Manahan and City Manager Dominic Cloud. They were joined by Jim Walsh of the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, as well as Terry Knight and Karen Bresnahan of St. Albans for the Future.last_img read more

Efficiency Vermont provides Vermont Foodbank with 15,000 CFL bulbs

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first_img### Efficiency Vermont is providing 15,000 60-, 75- and 100-watt equivalent compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs to the Vermont Foodbank, the state’s largest hunger-relief organization. The bulbs will be distributed to needy Vermonters through the Foodbank’s network of 270 sites located in all 14 counties of the state.The CFL distribution program kicks off during Hunger Action Month, a nationwide effort in September to motivate local action to end hunger.  In Vermont, the number of families seeking assistance from the Vermont Foodbank has risen 35-40 percent in the last 10 months.“We’re thrilled to support the Vermont Foodbank in its efforts to fight hunger in Vermont,” said Michael Russom, efficient products manager at Efficiency Vermont.  “For every CFL that’s used, needy Vermonters will save money on their energy bills, which gives them more money to buy the food they need.”Switching just six bulbs from incandescent to CFLs can save up to $250, and ENERGY STAR®-qualified CFLs use up to 75 percent less energy and can last 6-10 times longer than incandescent bulbs.  When any Vermonter saves energy, utilities generally need to buy less energy, so everyone’s electric bills are lower than they would be without energy-efficient practices.“September is Hunger Action Month, and we’re excited to work with Efficiency Vermont to empower our clients,” said John Sayles, CEO of the Vermont Foodbank.  “This partnership reduces energy usage and increases the funds available for purchasing food, moving us a step closer to eradicating hunger in our state.”The CFL bulbs, manufactured by Greenlite Corporation of Irvine, CA, are available through the Vermont Foodbank’s network of 270 food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, senior centers and after-school programs.The 15,000-CFL distribution project is the latest collaboration between Efficiency Vermont and the Vermont Foodbank.  The partnership extends to energy efficiency projects at Foodbank facilities around the state.At its new southern Vermont warehouse in Brattleboro, the Vermont Foodbank is adding new refrigeration systems that include advanced Freeaire® technology.  This new system utilizes temperature sensors linked to a fan controller to bring in fresh – and free – cold air when the outside temperature is below the necessary cooler temperature.Efficiency Vermont also has completed energy-saving projects with the Vermont Foodbank at its facilities in Barre and Wolcott, helping to make the business more energy efficient.“Every reduction in the Vermont Foodbank’s operating costs achieved through energy efficiency means that the Vermont Foodbank has more resources to do even more to support the neediest in communities around the state,” said Sheryl Graves, project manager at Efficiency Vermont.Efficiency Vermont was created by the Vermont Legislature and the Vermont Public Service Board to help all Vermonters reduce energy costs, strengthen the economy, and protect Vermont’s environment. Efficiency Vermont is currently operated by Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), an independent organization under contract to the Vermont Public Service Board. VEIC is a Vermont-based nonprofit organization founded in 1986. For more information, contact Efficiency Vermont at 888-921-5990 or visit www.efficiencyvermont.com(link is external).Source: Efficiency Vermont. Burlington, VT; September 24, 2009 –last_img read more

Vermont gasoline prices fall 5.6 cents

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first_imgAverage retail gasoline prices in Vermont have fallen 5.6 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $2.88/g yesterday. This compares with the national average that has fallen 3.5 cents per gallon in the last week to $2.87/g, according to gasoline price website VermontGasPrices.com.Including the change in gas prices in Vermont during the past week, prices yesterday were 59.3 cents per gallon higher than the same day one year ago and are 1.1 cents per gallon higher than a month ago. The national average has increased 0.4 cents per gallon during the last month and stands 58.4 cents per gallon higher than this day a year ago.Source: VermontGasPrices.com. 5.17.2010last_img read more

UVM, UMaine partner for Online weight management course

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first_imgThe University of Maine and the University of Vermont are joining forces this fall to offer a research-based online weight management course that helps college students develop healthy eating and exercise habits.”Vtrim Online” is a one-credit, semester-long course based on clinical research by Jean Harvey-Berino, Ph.D., R.D., a nationally recognized obesity researcher at the University of Vermont. Her concept is based on behavior changes: a systematic shaping of daily habits to help people move more and eat less.”There is a groundswell nationwide for universities to provide preventative health programming to students,” says Harvey-Berino. “It’s an ideal time in their lives to learn healthy eating behaviors for long-term health and earn college credit, too.”Vtrim arms students with the tactics and knowledge to sustainably combat weight gain through behavior modification — altering reactions to emotional and environmental stimuli through reinforcement of a new behavior, or a reduction in unhealthy behaviors. The University of Vermont has offered Vtrim since 2009.The entire program takes place online. Students are guided by a trained instructor, with whom they meet online weekly for a class in which lessons are discussed in a structured text-based chat room. Individual progress is tracked with online tools, including a food journal and exercise tracker. Students receive expert feedback on their progress.At UMaine, Rod Bushway and Susan Sullivan of the Food Science and Human Nutrition faculty and Ph.D. student Doug Mathews have worked to make the class available to students at UMaine.”We expect a great deal of student interest in the course,” Sullivan says. “Vtrim provides a good opportunity for UMaine students to learn about behavior modification techniques while benefiting their own health.”Though some students sign up to lose weight, most enroll to learn healthy behaviors. Students work with instructors to set realistic goals and establish healthy lifestyle perspectives.Typical weight loss has been 1-2 pounds per week for students in previous classes and 83 percent of people completing Vtrim achieve a clinically meaningful weight loss of 5-10 percent.Obesity continues to grow as a public health problem. Obesity prevalence is 19.1 percent for men and women aged 18-29 years, according to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and obesity rates increased in 28 states in 2009, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.”The University of Maine is proud to be part of a solution to the escalating trend of obesity and unhealthy eating and exercise habits,” says Robert C. White, associate provost and dean of the University of Maine’s Division of Lifelong Learning. Vtrim is being offered through the division’s continuing and distance education program.The course is open to all degree and non-degree students.http://www.uvm.edu/vtrim/vtrim-for-undergrads/(link is external).SOURCE University of Vermont. ORONO, Maine, Aug. 16, 2010 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

Green Mountain Power begins construction of Lowell wind project

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first_imgGreen Mountain Power Corp,Green Mountain Power (GMP) has begun construction of Kingdom Community Wind (KCW), a 63 MW renewable wind energy project in Lowell, Vermont. The 21 turbine wind project can provide power for more than 24,000 homes with the lowest-cost new renewable energy available to GMP customers and the members of the Vermont Electric Coop (VEC).”We are extremely excited to start construction on this important local, renewable energy project,” said Mary Powell, President and CEO of Green Mountain Power. “In addition to producing clean and reliable power for our customers and VEC members, Kingdom Community Wind is the most affordable new renewable energy available.”Kingdom Community Wind is the most significant renewable generation development in Vermont and it will provide a boost to the local and Vermont economy. The project has already employed Vermonters and Vermont firms in the pre-construction phase of the project. More than 90 different Vermont firms and vendors have participated in the project to date, with more than $4 million already invested in those companies. In the coming weeks, contractors, including Vermont-based contractors like J.A. McDonald of Lyndon Center and Bates & Murray of Barre, will be adding additional local employees to their existing Vermont employee base to work on Kingdom Community Wind.”This is a local energy project built by Vermonters, for Vermonters,” said Powell. “Through tax payments to the town of Lowell, the state education fund, the Good Neighbor Fund for surrounding towns and the economic activity created by the project’s construction, as well as competitively priced energy for many years to come, this project is a true win-win for all involved. We are grateful for the support we have received from the community.”Construction will consist of two affiliated projects. The first being the construction of the turbines, which will be complete and running by the end of 2012. The second includes upgrades to VEC’s transmission system between Lowell and Jay. VEC sought the upgrades as part of its long term capital plan, but through a partnership with GMP is now able to move more quickly on a more robust upgrade, while limiting the costs to its members.”Our 40 year old transmission system between Lowell and Jay needed to be upgraded to ensure safety and reliability,” said David Hallquist, CEO of the Vermont Electric Coop. “Our members have also told us that they want clean, local and affordable electricity. Our partnership with GMP on this renewable wind project will help us meet those requests in a way that keeps rates as low as possible.”In July, VEC members voted to support the transmission system upgrades, with nearly 80 percent in favor. The Kingdom Community Wind project has also been supported at the ballot box by Lowell voters during a 2010 Town Meeting Day ballot when three in four Lowell voters approved of the wind project.Kingdom Community Wind received a certificate of public good (CPG) from the Vermont Public Service Board in late May. GMP has now met all the pre-construction conditions in the CPG and received all of the permits required to begin construction, including permits related to protecting water quality that were issued late August.”We are committed to the highest environmental standards,” said Powell. “After all, a major reason for building a renewable wind project is to reduce carbon emissions and protect our natural environment. That is why it is so important that we maintain a strong environmental ethic in every aspect of Kingdom Community Wind.”Green Mountain Power’s environmental efforts are among the most extensive for such a project in Vermont. For example, for the first time for either wind or ski areas, there will be biological monitoring of streams during and following construction. GMP has also voluntarily collected data about the water chemistry of all the streams around the project to understand and protect future water quality.According to the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (ANR), “The monitoring program imposed on GMP to protect high quality waters is more restrictive than any program required of any Vermont ski area to date.” In addition, GMP made an extraordinary effort in the design to avoid stream and wetland impacts.”In my 25 years of working on water quality issues in Vermont, GMP has by far done more with the Kingdom Wind project than any other development project to provide a comprehensive and well-planned framework, including design, implementation, monitoring, and reporting to assure that water quality is protected,” said Jeff Nelson, Director of Environmental Services for VHB, who has worked as a consultant for GMP on water resources planning and permitting for the project since the outset.Green Mountain Power has been working toward the development of KCW for more than three years. All aspects of the project, from environmental to economic impacts, have been studied extensively and were subject to regulatory and public oversight. As construction on KCW moves ahead, GMP remains committed to being fully open and transparent about the project and its progress.With construction beginning, GMP is on schedule to ensure that KCW is operating by the end of 2012. In doing so, customers will benefit directly because the project will qualify for about $47 million in federal production tax credit that go entirely to lowering the cost of energy for GMP customers and VEC members.About Green Mountain PowerGreen Mountain Power generates, transmits, distributes and sells electricity in Vermont and is a leader in wind and solar generation. It serves more than 96,000 customers. www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external).COLCHESTER, VT–(Marketwire – September 06, 2011) –last_img read more